Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Urban Empire: A Symposium on Cities of the Early Modern Hispanic World

March 19th, 2010 - March 20th, 2010

Location
Tulane University
Uptown Campus

Schedule

Friday, March 19

Welcome
9:00 AM‘€“Jones Hall 100A (Greenleaf Conference Room)

Session 1: Architecture, Empire, and Modernity in Baroque Spain 9:15-11:45 AM‘€“Jones Hall 100 (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Session Chair: Carole Reese, School of Architecture, Tulane University
  • Jesús Escobar, Department of Art History, Northwestern University, ‘€œArchitecture and Imperial Identity in Seventeenth-Century Madrid‘€
  • Carmen Peraita, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Villanova University, ‘€œMonuments of Paper, Portable Archives: The Architecture of the Page in 17th-Century Spanish Chorographic Books‘€
  • Ricardo Padrón, Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, University of Virginia, ‘€œDon Quixote’s Barcelona: Seeing the Imperial City‘€
Respondents:
  • Michael Crawford, Department of History, McNeese State University
  • Ana Villar, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University

Lunch: 11:45- 12:45

Session 2: Imperial Footprints and Indigenous Identities in Colonial Andean Art and Architecture 1:00-3:30 PM‘€“Jones Hall 100A (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Session Chair: Marilyn Miller, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University
  • Susan Verdi Webster, Department of Art History, College of William and Mary, ‘€œAndeans and Europeans in the Construction of Colonial Quito‘€
  • Michael J. Schreffler, Department of Art History, Virginia Commonwealth University and Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, ‘€œImperial Signs and Civic Tensions in Colonial Cuzco, Peru‘€
  • Ari Zighelboim, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University,‘€œThe Painter, the Poet, the Bishop, and the Viceroy: Reflections on the Self-Representation of Viceregal Potosí, ca. 1716‘€
Respondents:
  • Elizabeth Boone, Newcomb Art Department, Tulane University
  • Derek Burdette, Newcomb Art Department, Tulane University

Visit to Latin American Library
4:00-5:00‘€“Latin American Library, 4th Floor, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library
Presenters and out-of-town guests welcome

Stone Center of Latin American Studies Pachanga: 5:00-6:00‘€“Jones Hall Patio

Keynote Address and Reception: 6:00-8:00 PM‘€“210 Woldenberg Art Center (Stone Auditorium)
Richard L. Kagan, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University – ‘€œPolicia and the Plaza: Utopian Views of the Colonial City‘€

Saturday, March 20

Session 3: Structures and Infrastructures of the Colonial City 9:00-11:30‘€“Jones Hall 100A (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Session Chair, Roxanne Dávila, Stone Center of Latin American Studies, Tulane University
  • Richard Conway, Department of History, Montclair State University, ‘€œCity, Countryside, and Spanish Municipal Order in Xochimilco, New Spain‘€
  • Rebecca Earle, Department of History, University of Warwick, ‘€œ‘€˜Temples Diversos o Contrarios a su Salud, Complexión y Naturaleza‘€™: Spanish Health and the Colonial City in Early Modern Spanish America‘€
  • Miruna Achim, Humanities Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, ‘€œMexico City’s Temperament Reconsidered: Hippocratism, Meteorology, and Urban Engineering at the End of the Eighteenth Century‘€
Respondents:
  • John Charles, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University
  • Brad Mollman, Department of History, Tulane University

Break: 11:30-12:00

Session 4: Building and Rebuilding Civic Foundations in the Hispanic Atlantic World 12:00-2:30‘€“Jones Hall 100A (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Session Chair, Justin Wolfe, Department of History, Tulane University
  • Guadalupe García, Department of History, Tulane University, ‘€œThe Walled City: Race and Empire in Colonial Havana‘€
  • Amanda Wunder, Department of History, Lehman College (CUNY), “The Phoenix of Seville: The Art of Regeneration, 1680-1717”
  • Emily Clark, Department of History, Tulane University, ‘€œNegotiating the New City: The New Orleans Fire of 1788‘€
Respondents:
  • Larry Powell, Department of History, Tulane University
  • Antonio Rueda, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Deep South Regional Humanities Center, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Department of History, Newcomb Art Department, and the Program for Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Free and open to the public.
For more information, contact Laura Bass (lrbass@tulane.edu) or Jim Boyden (jboyden@tulane.edu).

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This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment.

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