Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Las Américas Film Series: New Films From Latin America

February 19th, 2010 - March 11th, 2010

Location
Zeitgeist Multi-disciplinary Arts Center
1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70113
(504) 352-1150

This series is made possible through the generosity of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University, Las Américas Film Network, John Burton Harter Charitable Trust, and Ceballos Legal Consulting and Immigration Law.

Tulane faculty, staff & students get in free with ID.

For more information, see the Zeitgeist Home.
For movie information and previews, see Las Américas Films.

Series Schedule

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19 FROM 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.
LAMBI A RELE: A CELEBRATION OF ARTS TO BENEFIT HAITI.
Come immerse yourself in the culture of Haiti. Sample traditional Haitian cuisine and rum punch. There will be Haitian art on display, as well as recent photographs from Haiti for sale. We will also have a silent auction of original works by local artists, a raffle with great prizes from local businesses, live music and more! Contact Lambi.A.Rele@gmail.com for more info. All proceeds from this event will be donated to Yele Haiti for earthquake relief. http://yele.org

FEBRUARY 19 – 24 @ 7:30 p.m.
EL GENERAL by Natalia Almada – (Mexico) – Past and present collide in this extraordinarily crafted film when filmmaker Natalia Almada, winner of the US Directing Award: Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival, brings to life audio recordings she inherited from her grandmother. These recordings feature Alicia Calles’s reminiscences about her own father—Natalia’s great-grandfather—General Plutarco Elías Calles, a revolutionary general who became president of Mexico in 1924. Combining meticulously edited audio, haunting photographs, archival newsreels, and old Hollywood films with an original evocative soundtrack, sweeping footage of modern-day Mexico City, and interviews with today’s working poor. Winner U.S. Directing Award: Documentary at Sundance 2009 and the Cine Las Americas, Audience Award, Best Documentary. 83 minutes

FEBRUARY 19 – 24 @ 9:30 p.m.
TONY MANERO by Pablo Larrain – (Chile) – As Augusto Pinochet holds Chile in the grip of dictatorship, a fifty year old man obsessed with John Travolta’s character from Saturday Night Fever . Raúl Peralta and his friends gather in a small bar and act out their favorite scenes from the film. When the national television announces a Tony Manero impersonating contest it seems he may finally have a shot at living his dreams. But as Raúl and his dancing partners (also underground resistance fighters who rail against the regime) are persecuted by the secret police. Chile’s Official 2008 Academy award entry. Winner Grand Prize and Best actor at the Havana Film Festival and the KNF Director’s Prize Rotterdam Film Festival, 98 minutes

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 5:30 p.m.
LIVERPOOL by Lisandro Alonso – (Argentina) – One of the New Argentine Cinema’s most distinguished directors, has a singular voice that speaks once again in Liverpool. A graceful ode to solitude and the existential need for meaning, this story follows a sailor named Farrel on a lonely journey to the southernmost region of Argentina. After traveling the world, Farrel asks the captain if he can leave the ship to see if his mother still lives in their old village. Alonso’s wide shots of formidable mountain ranges connects Farrel’s gloomy trek through the snow with the dark past that haunts him, creating an engrossing aesthetic that sets the director apart as a master of style and technique. Grand Jury Prize Gijon Int. Film Festival. 84 mins.

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 7:30 p.m.
BIRDWATCHERS by Marcco Bechis – (Brazil) – In Mato Grosso do Sul, in rural Brazil, hordes of tourists come for bird watching. The Guarani-Kaiowá, the indigenous people who really own the land, are confined to a nearby reservation and are paid to stand naked along the shores of the river in face paint to provide thrills for the visitors. Fed up with their officially-imposed financial and spiritual impoverishment, tribal leaders and a local shaman organize a protest. Casting local non- professionals, the director draws out performances that highlight the sharp clash between tyranny and a spiritual and ancient culture connected to nature. 104 minutes

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 9:30 p.m.
GIGANTE by Adrian Biniez – (Uruguay) – Jara is a shy and lonely 35-year-old security guard at a supermarket on the outskirts of Montevideo. He works the night shift, monitoring the surveillance cameras of the entire building. One night he discovers Julia, a 25-year-old cleaning woman, through one of the cameras. Night after night, he watches her on the cameras while she works. Soon he starts following her after work: to the cinema, the beach and even to a date with another man. Jara’s life becomes a series of routines and rituals around Julia, but eventually he finds himself at a crossroad and must decide whether to give up his obsession or confront it. Winner Best First Feature, Grand Jury Prize and the Alfred Bauer Prize at the Berlin Int. Film Festival. 85 minutes

March 5 & 7 @ 7:30 p.m.
NORA’S WILL by Marciana Chenillo – (Mexico) Before dying, Nora schemes a plan to make José, her ex-husband, take care of her corpse. But she is missing something. For the only flaw in the plan – a mysterious photograph forgotten under the bed- will lead to an unexpected outcome reminding us that the biggest love stories are sometimes hidden in the smallest places. Winner Audience Award Miami Film Festival and Jury Prize and Best First Feature Los Angeles Latino Film Festival. 90 minutes

March 5 & 7 @ 9:30 p.m.
DOS PATRIAS (TWO HOMELANDS, CUBA AND THE NIGHT) by Christian Liffers – (Cuba) Framed by the beautiful poetry of the oppressed Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas, this revealing documentary features memorable portraits of five gay men and one transsexual woman living in and around Havana. It has been more than ten years since the success of films like Strawberry and Chocolate and Gay Cuba, so Two Homelands provides a fresh and important look at the present-day gay culture and community of an often misunderstood country that is still stuck in the past but also very dynamic and full of surprises. Cuba is the country where they live, but the night is where they thrive. 84 minutes.

March 8 & 9 @ 7:30 p.m.
WHO AM I? (THE FOUND CHILDREN OF ARGENTINA) by Estela Bravo – (Argentina) – What does it feel like to suddenly discover that your parents are not actually your parents, but part of a network of military criminals who murdered your mother and father? The children of Argentina’s disappeared are now young adults struggling with such complex and traumatic discoveries. For three decades, the Plaza de Mayo Grandmothers have searched for their 500 stolen grandchildren, the children of their own children who disappeared in Argentina’s Dirty War. To date, 88 of these missing children have been found and have recovered their true identity. 75 minutes.

March 8 & 9 @ 9:30 p.m.
THE MAN OF TWO HAVANAS by Vivien Weismen Lesnik – (Cuba) – Through the prism of a daughter we explore the past, the present, and the nature of social responsibility and personal sacrifice. The movie contains highly controversial top-secret audiotapes of a CIA trained Cuban exile Terrorist who is in the middle of a trial and incarcerated by Homeland Security. His trial puts the Bush administration’s War on Terror on trial as well. The audiotape excerpts are from an NYT reporter who refuses to turn over these tapes. The never before heard audiotapes will be hotly debated in the media. 93 minutes.

March 10 & 11 @ 7:30 p.m.
THE INHERITORS by Eugenio Polgovsky – (Mexico) – THE INHERITORS immerses us in the daily lives of children who, with their families, survive only by their unrelenting labor. The film takes us into the agricultural fields, where children barely bigger than the buckets they carry, work long hours, in often hazardous conditions, picking tomatoes, peppers, or beans, for which they are paid by weight. This film reveals how the cycle of poverty is passed on, from one generation to another. Grand Prize Festival of New Latin Cinema. 90 minutes.

March 10 & 11 @ 9:30 p.m.
OBLIVION by Heddy Honigmann – (Peru) – Peru’s capital city of Lima, reveals its startling contrasts of wealth and poverty, and how many of its poorest citizens have survived decades of economic crisis, terrorism and government violence, denial of workers’ rights, and political corruption. OBLIVION provides intimate and moving portraits of street musicians, singers, vendors, shoeshine boys, and the gymnasts (some mere children) and jugglers who perform at traffic stops. The film also visits small business owners who although include in the daily interactions of the city’s wealthy, live in near poverty in the city’s slums. Winner International Film Critics Prize and the Silver Dove Award at the Leipzig Documentary Film Festival. 93 minutes.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

RESOURCES

All Events

Upcoming Events

Newcomb Art Museum Exhibit Features Modern Sculptures Inspired by Mexican Ceramics

View Full Event Description

Come celebrate the opening of Newcomb Art Museum’s latest exhibitions Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

5:30 PM
Private VIP/members reception featuring catering by Araña, a tequila tasting, specialty cocktails, and music.

6:30 PM
Curatorial talk with Nuria Rodriguez Sadurni, Director of Special Projects at the Cultural Cooperation office of the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Free and open to the public.

7:30-9:00 PM
Public reception.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board



LSU and The Modern History Colloquium and the Ogden Honors College: Lecture Series

View Full Event Description

The Modern History Colloquium and the Ogden Honors College invites you to a series of lectures hosted by LSU

Father Perez’s Revolution: Constitutional Catholicism in 20th Century Mexico
Professor Matthew Butler (UT-Austin)
Thursday, January 18th at 6:00 PM
French House, Grand Salon

Dr. Butler is one of the preeminent scholars of the Catholic Church and politics in 20th century Mexico. He is the author of Popular Piety and Political Identity in Mexico’s Cristero Rebellion (Oxford, 2004) and Faith and Impiety in Revolutionary Mexico (Palgrave, 2007). Butler will speak about his forthcoming book, describing religious change and adaptation during and after the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940).

Provincializing 1968 Mexico: A Historiographical Critique
Professor Jaime Pensado (Notre Dame)
Friday, January 19th at 3:30 PM
French House, Feature Classroom

Dr. Pensado is the author of Rebel Mexico: Student Unrest and Authoritarian Political Culture During the Long Sixties (Stanford, 2013). His new book project takes up a set of research questions that have not been addressed in the historiography of modern Mexico, but which he argues, will complicate our understanding of the turbulent, combative, and at a times contradictory character of the Cold War era: how did conservative and progressive sectors of the Catholic Church—particularly those invested in education, student politics and entertainment—respond to the contentious environment that emerged inside Mexico’s most important universities during the postwar era? How did young Catholic students respond to the rise of leftist militancy that came to characterize their schools in the wake of the Cuban Revolution?

All Events Open to the Public
For more information on the event, click here.

Professional Development Opportunity: Latin American Resources for the K-12 Classroom

View Full Event Description

S.S. NOLA, in collaboration with the Latin American Resource Center, will be hosting a professional development opportunity for K-12 educators on Saturday, January 20, 2018, to examine the ways in which educators can utilize and share resources on Latin America in the classroom. This is a free workshop for K-12 educators and refreshments will be served. Visit the official event website for more information and to register.

S.S. NOLA was created to support K-12 social studies teachers in the New Orleans area by showcasing student-centered lesson plans, loaning classroom supplies free of charge, and hosting professional development workshops. To learn more about the mission of S.S. NOLA, visit their official website, and don’t forget to follow them on Twitter and Facebook! S.S. NOLA is run by Brooke Grant, a professor of practice in the Tulane Teacher Preparation and Certification program.

Stone Center for Latin American Studies to Host 10th Annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 10th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on January 27, 2018. The application deadline is January 20, 2018.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 20, 2018, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraphy statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy at lmurphy2@tulane.edu or Jimmy Huck at jhuck@tulane.edu.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Foreign Language Pedagogy and Research

View Full Event Description

Call for Papers: Foreign Language Pedagogy and Research: New Approaches to Old Challenges
The goal of this symposium is to bring the Tulane University foreign language instructor community together by sharing foreign language teaching ideas, methods and practices. The symposium is open to all foreign language instructors and graduate students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal.

Submissions:

  • Deadline for abstract submission: January 31st, 2018
  • Proposal should include a one-page description of the presentation and the name(s) and contact information of the (co)-presenter(s).
  • Presentations will be organized with a general format of 15 minutes for topic presentation/hands-on demonstration and 5 minutes for questions/discussion.
  • Interactive presentations are strongly encouraged. Presentations should be in English, however examples/exercises can be in the target language.
  • All submissions should be sent to rjudd@tulane.edu.
  • Notifications of acceptance will be sent by February, 20th 2018.

For more information about the symposium, guidelines, or requirements, please email:
Ryan Judd at rjudd@tulane.edu:mailto:rjudd@tulane.edu,
Roxanne Davilá at rdavila@tulane.edu:mailto:rdavila@tulane.edu, or
Charles Mignot at cmignot@tulane.edu:mailto:cmignot@tulane.edu.

Global Read Webinar Series: Diverse Social Justice Books for the High School Classroom

View Full Event Description

Once a month, the World Area Book Awards (Américas Award, Africana Book Award, Middle East Outreach Book Award, South Asia Book Award) sponsor a free 60 minute webinar on a book recognized by one of the awards and facilitate a discussion with the author on how to incorporate the book into the classroom. The 2018 Spring Webinar Series focuses on social justice. We encourage educators to read the books with your colleagues, students, and community, and then join us to hear more from the author.

On Thursday, February 8, 2018, join us for a 60 minute webinar/chat focused on Margarita Engle’s recent book Lion Island: Cuba’s Warrior of Words. In this haunting yet hopeful novel in verse, award-winning author Margarita Engle tells the story of Antonio Chuffat, a young man of African, Chinese, and Cuban descent who became a champion of civil rights. The webinar will be available through Blackboard Collaborate. The book is appropriate for students in grades 8-12.