Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Justicia Now! Film Screening and Filmmaker Q & A at the New Orleans Film Festival

October 14th, 2009
7:15 PM

Contemporary Arts Center
900 Camp St.
New Orleans, LA

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies presents Latin American film at this year’s 20th Annual New Orleans Film Festival. The Stone Center’s Biennial Latin American Environmental Media Festival awarded Justicia Now! the Grand Jury Best of the Festival prize last April 2009. Filmmakers Robbie Proctor and Martin O’Brien of MoFilms will now present their award-winning film at this year’s 20th Annual New Orleans Film Festival at the Contemporary Arts Center on Wednesday, October 14 at 7:15 pm.

We invite you to a reception preceding the screening at 6:00 pm at the CAC.

Latin American Film Programming at the 20th New Orleans Film Festival:

Sunday, October 11 at 12 noon
Canal Place Cinema

  • El Sistema Germany. 2009. 102 min.
    Jose Antonio Abreu used his love for music to help ordinary children find a way out of the trappings of Venezuela’s pitfalls of dire poverty. His project started in 1975 and three decades later his movement has bloomed into a full-fledged public works program that several countries around the world now want to copy and implement. El Sistema shows how Abreu’s astonishing ideas result in a most improbable social project that has come to embrace all of Venezuelan society. A complex film, its beauty is in showing the emotions of the various children who now have found a way out of the violence and poverty.
    DIR: Paul Smaczny, Maria Stodtmeier PROD: Maria Stodtmeier CAM: Michael Boomers ED: Steffen Herrmann

Monday, October 12 at 9:30 pm – screened as part of Doc Shorts Program 1
Contemporary Arts Center

  • El Play USA. 2008. Documentary Short.
    El Play tells the story of Jairo Manuel Candelario, a young aspiring baseball player from San Pedro de Macorís, a small city in The Dominican Republic famous for birthing some of the world’s most talented baseball players. The film paint’s a detailed portrait of Jairo and his tireless commitment to the game as he balances his hopes of signing a professional contract with the reality of its improbability. Interviewed are professional scouts, coaches, family members, a baseball historian, and San Pedro-born Robinson Canó, the second baseman of the New York Yankees.
    DIR: Pablo Medina.

Wednesday, October 14
All at Contemporary Arts Center

5:00 pm

  • Beauty of the Fight USA. 2008. 69 min. Documentary Feature.
    In his photography book and documentary film Beauty of the Fight, photographer and director John Urbano explores, with intimate and devastating imagery, the effects of historic realities on two Panama barrios. Barraza and El Chorrillo suffered heavy losses when U.S. forces invaded in 1989 in order to capture General Manuel Noriega, and now this “Interim” shantytown nears extinction due to recent outside private and commercial development. With deft camera work and under military police protection while entering the “Red Zone,” the filmmakers render for posterity not only the daily struggle but also the dignity, joy, and heightened awareness of its residents. Boxers, cock fighters, gang bangers, street urchins, small business owners, family members, community leaders, and visionaries detail the day to day plight to hold onto the homes and endure the loss of loved ones due to street conflicts while they express the inevitable hopes of all peoples who fall victim to the unconscious political and economic forces. Not only does the film give voice to the people of this neighborhood, but it also explores the vagaries of documenting a community destined to slip into the past.
    DIR/PROD/CAM/ED: John Urbano

7:15 pm

  • Documentary Shorts Program 3: Latin American Docs (Total 42 mins.)

  • Justicia Now! JUSTICIA NOW! is a documentary about Chevron Texaco’s toxic legacy in the Northern Ecuadorian region of the Amazon rain forest—and a courageous group of people called Los Afectados (The Affected Ones) who are seeking justice for the ensuing cancer, sickness and death in the largest environmental class action lawsuit in history. Directors: Martin O’Brien and Robbie Proctor. USA. 2008. 31 min.
    Imagine Hurricane Katrina was not a hurricane but an event sponsored by the federal government, in collaboration with several multinational corporations. If your imagination fails you, watch Battle for the Xingu. The Xingu, a tributary of the Amazon, is home to over 10,000 indigenous people who rely on the river for survival. The Brazilian government is proposing what would be the world’s third largest hydroelectric dam, threatening to destroy the biodiversity of the region and deprive these people of their rights to a sustainable future. The filmmakers were in Altamira in 2008 for the Xingu Alive Encounter to witness the spectacular determination of the Amazon people to protect their way of life. Today, plans to build the dam continue; so do the protests. Director: Iara Lee. USA. 2009. 11 min. Regional Premiere.

9:30 pm

  • Super Amigos
  • *Mexico. 2007. 82 min. Documentary.
    Mexico City is not Gotham City but if you were to run into any of the five masked activists who protect this metropolis, you’d wonder if you were not living inside a comic book. These modern-day super heroes are a group of Lucha Libre wrestlers who have taken their fight out of the ring and into the streets of the Mexican capital. Super Barrio, Super Gay, Super Ecologista, Super Animal, and Fray Tormenta are real life masked super heroes who fight against evil slumlords, corrupt politicians, homophobia, pollution, animal rights abusers, and poverty. Though their true identity remains a mystery, they could easily be Mexico City’s most popular figures and last salvation.
    DIR/WRITER/PROD: Arturo Perez Torres PROD: Heather Haynes CAM: Mario Gallegos ED: Cameron Esler




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Upcoming Events

Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture

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Join Dr. Emily Greenwood as she will be speaking about Greek language/literature, slavery, and the “politics of the human” when she delivers the Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture.

Emily Greenwood is Professor and Chair of the Classics Department at Yale University where she also holds a joint appointment in African American Studies. She is one of the pre-eminent thinkers on Greek historiography of her generation as well as the leading figure in re-evaluating the legacy of Graeco-Roman culture in colonial and post-colonial contexts. In addition to her book Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford 2010) [Joint winner of the Runciman Prize], she has published over a dozen articles and book chapters that investigate the rich and nuanced reception of ancient Greek literature in the African Diaspora, especially in Caribbean literature.

Africana Studies Brown Bag Lecture with Prof. Dan Sharp

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“Naná Vasconcelos: Afro-Brazilian Percussion in Paris and New York City”

Dan Sharp is currently research for a book that revolves around the 1980 album Saudades by Afro-Brazilian Naná Vasconcelos. The book will situate Naná‘s reimagining of percussion and voice in the context of his itinerant life in New York, Europe and Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. Snacks provided!

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

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What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

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Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

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Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at