Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Views and Visions: Perspectives in Iberian and Latin American Literatures

October 9th, 2009 - October 10th, 2009

Tulane University

Department of Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Student Organization Conference

Conference Website


Friday, October 9

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Welcome and Registration (Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100)

6:00 PM – 8:00PM
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Rolena Adorno (Yale University)
“The Inca Speaks English: The Comentarios reales‘s First Appearance outside Spanish, 1625”

Rolena Adorno, the Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Spanish and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University, is one of today’s foremost scholars in the fields of colonial Spanish American history and literary studies. Professor Adorno’s most recent books are The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative (2007), recipient of the Modern Language Association of America’s prestigious Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize, and De Guancane a Macondo: estudios de literatura hispanoamericana (2008). She has also completed studies of the making and censorship of the manuscripts of Fray Martín de Murúa for the Getty Research Institute (2008) and is co-author (with Patrick C. Pautz) of the three-volume book, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: His Account, His Life, and the Expedition of Pánfilo de Narváez (1999), which was awarded the J. Franklin Jameson Award of the American Historical Association. Her keynote address at Tulane will discuss the reception of The Royal Commentaries by El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, early chronicler of the Inca Empire and widely considered Spanish America’s first native historian.

Saturday, October 10

7:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Continental Breakfast (Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100)

9:00 AM – 10:20 AM
PANEL 1 – Fronteras fluidas: historia y literatura (Greenleaf Conference Room)

  • Moderator: Prof. Antonio Gómez
  • Paula Thorrington (UCLA): “Poetry off the Page and into the Public Eye: Raúl Zurita’s Sky Writings, Earthworks, and Visual Verse”
  • Kurt Hofer (Tulane University): “In Search of the Present: Returning to History in 2666 by Roberto Bolaño”
  • Antonio Villarruel (FLACSO-Ecuador): “Volubles binarios: migración latinoamericana en la nueva narrativa española y ecuatoriana”

10:30 AM – 11:40 AM
PANEL 2 – Repensando imágenes: América y España (Greenleaf Conference Room)

  • Moderator: Prof. Laura Bass
  • Antonio Rueda (Tulane University): “Imágenes en lucha: Lepanto visto por Fernando de Herrera y los pintores venecianos”
  • Ana Villar (Tulane University): “Entre el Guadalquivir y el Esgueva: Representaciones de paisajes en la poesía de Góngora”
  • Jon Malax-Echevarría Uribe (Tulane University): “Dominadas por el hombre ausente en La casa de Bernarda Alba

12:00 PM – 12:50 PM
PANEL 3 – Comparando perspectivas (Greenleaf Conference Room)

  • Moderator: Prof. Fernando Rivera-Díaz
  • Rosa Díaz Cobo (University of California, Riverside): “Dos versiones de la reconquista azteca: Codex Espagliensis de Guillermo Gómez Peña y Atomik Aztek de Sesslu”
  • Naida Saavedra (Florida State University): “Siguiendo el curso del Niágara: El torrente poético de Heredia, Gómez de Avellaneda y Pérez Bonalde”

1:00 PM – 2:30PM

2:45 PM – 3:10 PM
PANEL 4 – Técnicas narrativas: diversas perspectivas (Greenleaf Conference Room)

  • Moderator: Prof. Rebecca Atencio
  • Cecily Raynor (Middleburry College): “La representación visual y narrativa de la figura femenina en la literatura policíaca de Latinoamérica”
  • Camila Pavanelli (Tulane University): “Alguns aspectos da voz narrativa de O filho eterno, de Cristovao Tezza: distância entre autor, narrador e personagem”
  • Natalia Valencia (University of California, Berkeley): “Estoy estando: Jugar con el tiempo para atrapar la imagen”
  • Brandon Bisbey (Tulane University): “Narradores machadianos: a ironia da escravidão”

4:20 PM – 5:40 PM
PANEL 5 – Miradas veladas (Greenleaf Conference Room)

  • Moderator: Prof. Jean Dangler
  • Kristen Austin (Tulane University): “El arte de la narración y el enigma de la narradora en El cuarto de atrás de Carmen Martín Gaite”
  • Jennifer Borton (University of California, Riverside): “‘C’ de creación: Un análisis comparativo de la metafic ción en Niebla, de Miguel de Unamuno, y El cuarto de atrás, de Carmen Martín Gaite”
  • Ivelisse Collazo (Florida State University): “La mirada oculta en “Epítomes (Compendios)”
  • Teresa Lorenz (University of Arizona): “Blanco y negro equivale a gris, el color de la confusión: El área grisácea de El deseo/Desire

5:50 PM – 6:50PM
PANEL 6 – Expresiones poéticas

  • Moderator: Prof. Idelber Avelar
  • Giancarlo Stagnaro (Tulane University): “La efusión poética en Vallejo y Bataille. Una lectura de poemas en prosa”
  • Boncho Dragiyski (Washington University, Saint Louis): “Synaesthetic Spectacles: The Games of Color in Tango by Carlos Saura”
  • Luis O. Rosa (Princeton University): “Los ojos no son para ver: Macedonio, Borges y Derrida”

7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
RECEPTION (Jones Hall Patio)

This event is being sponsored by the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Organization, the GSSA, and the Dean of Liberal Arts and hosted by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free and open to the public. For more information please contact the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at (504) 865-5518.

Download the Program

Photo by Ph.D. Candidate Hilary Smith, Stone Center for Latin American Studies




All Events

Upcoming Events

Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture

View Full Event Description

Join Dr. Emily Greenwood as she will be speaking about Greek language/literature, slavery, and the “politics of the human” when she delivers the Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture.

Emily Greenwood is Professor and Chair of the Classics Department at Yale University where she also holds a joint appointment in African American Studies. She is one of the pre-eminent thinkers on Greek historiography of her generation as well as the leading figure in re-evaluating the legacy of Graeco-Roman culture in colonial and post-colonial contexts. In addition to her book Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford 2010) [Joint winner of the Runciman Prize], she has published over a dozen articles and book chapters that investigate the rich and nuanced reception of ancient Greek literature in the African Diaspora, especially in Caribbean literature.

Africana Studies Brown Bag Lecture with Prof. Dan Sharp

View Full Event Description

Naná Vasconcelos: Afro-Brazilian Percussion in Paris and New York City

Dan Sharp is currently conducting research for a book that revolves around the 1980 album Saudades by Afro-Brazilian Naná Vasconcelos. The book will situate Naná‘s reimagining of percussion and voice in the context of his itinerant life in New York, Europe and Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. Snacks provided!

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

View Full Event Description

What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

View Full Event Description

Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English