Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Views and Visions: Perspectives in Iberian and Latin American Literatures

October 9th, 2009 - October 10th, 2009

Location
Tulane University

Department of Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Student Organization Conference

Conference Website

SCHEDULE

Friday, October 9

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Welcome and Registration (Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100)

6:00 PM – 8:00PM
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Rolena Adorno (Yale University)
‘€œThe Inca Speaks English: The Comentarios reales‘€™s First Appearance outside Spanish, 1625‘€

Rolena Adorno, the Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Spanish and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University, is one of today‘€™s foremost scholars in the fields of colonial Spanish American history and literary studies. Professor Adorno‘€™s most recent books are The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative (2007), recipient of the Modern Language Association of America‘€™s prestigious Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize, and De Guancane a Macondo: estudios de literatura hispanoamericana (2008). She has also completed studies of the making and censorship of the manuscripts of Fray Martín de Murúa for the Getty Research Institute (2008) and is co-author (with Patrick C. Pautz) of the three-volume book, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: His Account, His Life, and the Expedition of Pánfilo de Narváez (1999), which was awarded the J. Franklin Jameson Award of the American Historical Association. Her keynote address at Tulane will discuss the reception of The Royal Commentaries by El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, early chronicler of the Inca Empire and widely considered Spanish America‘€™s first native historian.

Saturday, October 10

7:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Continental Breakfast (Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100)

9:00 AM – 10:20 AM PANEL 1 – Fronteras fluidas: historia y literatura (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Moderator: Prof. Antonio Gómez
  • Paula Thorrington (UCLA): ‘€œPoetry off the Page and into the Public Eye: Raúl Zurita‘€™s Sky Writings, Earthworks, and Visual Verse‘€
  • Kurt Hofer (Tulane University): ‘€œIn Search of the Present: Returning to History in 2666 by Roberto Bolaño‘€
  • Antonio Villarruel (FLACSO-Ecuador): ‘€œVolubles binarios: migración latinoamericana en la nueva narrativa española y ecuatoriana‘€
10:30 AM – 11:40 AM PANEL 2 – Repensando imágenes: América y España (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Moderator: Prof. Laura Bass
  • Antonio Rueda (Tulane University): ‘€œImágenes en lucha: Lepanto visto por Fernando de Herrera y los pintores venecianos‘€
  • Ana Villar (Tulane University): ‘€œEntre el Guadalquivir y el Esgueva: Representaciones de paisajes en la poesía de Góngora‘€
  • Jon Malax-Echevarría Uribe (Tulane University): ‘€œDominadas por el hombre ausente en La casa de Bernarda Alba‘€
12:00 PM – 12:50 PM PANEL 3 – Comparando perspectivas (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Moderator: Prof. Fernando Rivera-Díaz
  • Rosa Díaz Cobo (University of California, Riverside): ‘€œDos versiones de la reconquista azteca: Codex Espagliensis de Guillermo Gómez Peña y Atomik Aztek de Sesslu‘€
  • Naida Saavedra (Florida State University): ‘€œSiguiendo el curso del Niágara: El torrente poético de Heredia, Gómez de Avellaneda y Pérez Bonalde‘€

1:00 PM – 2:30PM
LUNCH (LBC)

2:45 PM – 3:10 PM PANEL 4 – Técnicas narrativas: diversas perspectivas (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Moderator: Prof. Rebecca Atencio
  • Cecily Raynor (Middleburry College): ‘€œLa representación visual y narrativa de la figura femenina en la literatura policíaca de Latinoamérica‘€
  • Camila Pavanelli (Tulane University): ‘€œAlguns aspectos da voz narrativa de O filho eterno, de Cristovao Tezza: distância entre autor, narrador e personagem‘€
  • Natalia Valencia (University of California, Berkeley): ‘€œ_Estoy estando_: Jugar con el tiempo para atrapar la imagen‘€
  • Brandon Bisbey (Tulane University): ‘€œNarradores machadianos: a ironia da escravidão‘€
4:20 PM – 5:40 PM PANEL 5 – Miradas veladas (Greenleaf Conference Room)
  • Moderator: Prof. Jean Dangler
  • Kristen Austin (Tulane University): ‘€œEl arte de la narración y el enigma de la narradora en El cuarto de atrás de Carmen Martín Gaite‘€
  • Jennifer Borton (University of California, Riverside): ‘€œ‘€˜C‘€™ de creación: Un análisis comparativo de la metafic ción en Niebla, de Miguel de Unamuno, y El cuarto de atrás, de Carmen Martín Gaite‘€
  • Ivelisse Collazo (Florida State University): ‘€œLa mirada oculta en ‘€œEpítomes (Compendios)‘€
  • Teresa Lorenz (University of Arizona): ‘€œBlanco y negro equivale a gris, el color de la confusión: El área grisácea de El deseo/Desire‘€
5:50 PM – 6:50PM PANEL 6 – Expresiones poéticas
  • Moderator: Prof. Idelber Avelar
  • Giancarlo Stagnaro (Tulane University): ‘€œLa efusión poética en Vallejo y Bataille. Una lectura de poemas en prosa‘€
  • Boncho Dragiyski (Washington University, Saint Louis): ‘€œSynaesthetic Spectacles: The Games of Color in Tango by Carlos Saura‘€
  • Luis O. Rosa (Princeton University): ‘€œLos ojos no son para ver: Macedonio, Borges y Derrida‘€

7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
RECEPTION (Jones Hall Patio)

This event is being sponsored by the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Organization, the GSSA, and the Dean of Liberal Arts and hosted by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free and open to the public. For more information please contact the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at (504) 865-5518.

Download the Program

Photo by Ph.D. Candidate Hilary Smith, Stone Center for Latin American Studies

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Upcoming Events

Lunch with LAGO featuring Ruben Luciano

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Join the Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) on Friday, 1/24 at 12pm for the latest installment of our bi-weekly lunch series. Ruben Luciano is a Ph.D. student in the Tulane University History department, specializing in modern Latin American (specifically, Dominican) history, the military under dictatorship, intersectionality, and gender. He also has two Master’s degrees in the Social Sciences and Health Communication. He’ll be speaking on his thesis project, entitled “Queering the Trujillato: Reinterpretations of Loyalty, Criminality, and Homosociality in the Dominican Military from 1930-61.” Afterwards, we’ll open the floor for a Q & A, allowing for further conversation about Ruben’s work, more practical questions about the dissertation research and writing experience, and navigating the grants application process as a Ph.D. student.

The Labyrinth will be serving mini paninis, bagels, savory spreads and dips, desserts (including tres leches cake) and fresh juices. Please come hungry!

Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

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Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

This collaborative workshop is designed for middle to high school Social Studies educators to enhance the teaching of the Tunica community while highlighting this group as part of a series of ancient civilizations currently taught at the K-12 level. This workshop is the first one in the series aimed at increasing and extending the current teaching of ancient civilizations in the Americas. The local focus on Louisiana indigenous people and culture will enable educators to create deeper connections when teaching about indigenous identity across the Americas such as the Maya, the Aztec and the Inca.

This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Language Instructors Donna Pierite and Elisabeth Pierite Mora of the Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture Revitalization Program (LCRP) will share the history of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe beginning in 1541 up to the 1700s when the tribes reached the Avoyelles Prairie. Through story, song and dance they will share the Tunica language and Tunica-Biloxi culture. They will highlight the cultural educational initiatives of LCRP, and provide a list of online resources and samples of pedagogical materials for attendees.

Sponsored by the Middle American Research Institute, S.S. NOLA, and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Bate Papo! Primavera 2020

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A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome! Meetings take place on Fridays at different hours and locations. See the full schedule below:

January 17th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de maracuja

January 24th, 3 PM, Boot
Treat: Suco de caju

January 31st, 4PM, Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St.)
Treat: Suco de caja

February 7th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Agua de coco

February 14th, 11 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Guarana

February 21st, 12PM, PJs Willow
Treat: Cha de maracuja

February 28th, 2PM, Sharp Residence Hall
Treat: Cafe brasiliero

March 6th, 10 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Cha matte

March 13th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de goiaba

March 20th, 3 PM, Greenbaum House
Treat: Limonada a brasiliera

March 27th, 12 PM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Batido de abacate

April 3rd, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de acai

April 17th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Caldo de cana

April 24th, 2 PM, Boot
Treat: Groselha

Graduate Student Writing Group

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The Graduate Student Writing Group convenes on Fridays from 1:30 – 3:30 PM. These structured writing sessions are open to Latin Americanist graduate students in all departments. Students, who arrive with a project and a goal, work in communal silence during two 45 minute blocks separated by a 10-minute coffee break. All meetings will be held in the Latin American Library Seminar Room. Co-sponsored by the Stone Center and the Latin American Library.

Ancient Civilizations K-16 Series for Social Studies Educators

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Ancient Civilizations
K-16 Educator Workshop Series
Spring 2020

For educators of grade levels: K-12

Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute (MARI), Stone Center for Latin American Studies (SCLAS), S.S. NOLA, and AfterCLASS will host a professional development workshop series open to all K-16 school professionals. These workshops will challenge educators to learn about the unexpected impact and connections of Ancient civilizations from Central America to the Gulf South. In particular, the workshops will foster a deeper comprehension of how to incorporate art, language and food across the disciplines. Participants will learn unique ways to incorporate the Tunica, Maya and Aztec cultures into the classroom in a variety of subjects. Registration for each workshop is $5 and includes light snacks, teaching resources, and a certificate of completion.

The workshop series will prepare teachers:

  • To utilize digital humanities resources in the classroom;
  • To design culturally appropriate primary and secondary research projects;
  • To teach about Pre-Columbian and ancient civilizations, language, geography and foods;
  • To encourage student self-determination through meaningful and relevant cultural projects.

Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Tunica of the Lower Mississippi River Valley
Middle American Research Institute – Seminar Room
6823 St. Charles Avenue
This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Participants will explore the physical, cultural and linguistic characteristics of the region. Representatives of the Tunica community will introduce their language and culture and the work they do to preserve their language.

Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Understanding Maya Fare: Beyond Tamales and Cacao
AfterCLASS – Taylor Education Center
612 Andrew Higgins Blvd. #4003
In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from chocolate specialists and our Kaqchikel language scholar will discuss the importance of corn. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, May 2020
Aztec Mexican Art and Culture
Participants in this workshop will explore the art and culture of the Aztec community. Date TBD

Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A K-12 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2020
Cost: $3580

Now, in its fifth year, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University are proud to announce the return of our annual two-week summer educator institute exploring the geography, culture and history of Cuba. For an educator, Cuba is rich with lessons to bring into the classroom. This program highlights the important historical and cultural connections between the United States and Cuba. Participants will explore key sites and meet local experts and artists who will provide unique insight for educators who teach such subjects as U.S./Latin American Relations, World Geography, World History, and Spanish among others. Come and visit the site of the historic Bay of Pigs, explore Milton Hershey’s sugar plantation and the Cuban national literacy campaign.

Fill out the online APPLICATION here, due March 15, 2020.

Additional materials needed:
  • Two letters of recommendation (please make sure to have at least one recommendation letter from a colleague at your school) Please email your recommenders the PDF above. They submit via email the complete recommendation letter.
  • Copy of Passport
  • $200 program deposit

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:

  • Lodging at Casa Vera (double occupancy)
  • At least 1 meal a day (at Casa Vera and on excursions)
  • Transportation to/from airport to residence (if you arrive on time)
  • Medical insurance: Each participant will be covered for the entire program length by a travel health insurance policy.
  • Group tours and excursions, with associated transportation

THE PROGRAM DOES NOT INCLUDE:

  • Airfare to/from the U.S.: approx. $300-$600
  • Visa: $50-$100 depending on airline
  • Checked luggage ($25) + Overweight baggage: This constitutes anything in excess of maximum allowed luggage weight (50lbs), both going and returning from Cuba.
  • Communication: Internet and long distance/international calls
  • Additional meals (1 a day, snacks)
  • Taxi/ground transportation: Participants are responsible for expenses incurred getting around town during free time.
  • Admission to museums, events, etc.: Participants will be responsible for these expenses unless they are part of itinerary.
  • All materials and personal expenditures
  • Loss/Theft Travel Insurance: Please note only travel medical insurance is included in program. If you would like additional coverage (including insurance for loss of baggage, emergency cash transfers, etc.), it is recommended that you purchase additional insurance.

APPLICATION

Please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164 for additional details.

Preview the Itinerary here