Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Life, Love, and Labor of African Descendants in Late-Colonial Veracruz: An Analysis of the 1791 Census

October 14th, 2019
5:00 PM

Location
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

Join us at the Stone Center for this public lecture by Dr. Beau D.J. Gaitors, Assistant Professor at Winston Salem State University.

In the port city of Veracruz in 1791, African descendants represented thirty-five percent of the population whose race was identified and roughly twenty-five percent of the overall population according to the census of 1791. Employing the census of 1791, this presentation goes beyond the numeric representation of African descendants in the port city of Veracruz. Instead, it demonstrates how the 1791 census affords an opportunity for a complex analysis of African descendants in Veracruz in terms of race, occupation and marital status (among other aspects). This presentation engages these characteristics to view the position of African descendants in a late-colonial urban context in Mexico and details how the methodological use of census records has broader implications for other regions and time periods.

Beau D.J. Gaitors is an assistant professor of history in the Department of History, Politics, & Social Justice at Winston-Salem State University. His research focuses on the African diaspora with a particular emphasis on the social, political, and economic contributions of African descendants during the transition to independence in Mexico. He received his PhD from Tulane University (2017) in the Department of History. He received his M.A. in History from Purdue University (2010). Dr. Gaitors holds a B.A. in International Relations and a B.A. in Africana Studies from Brown University (2008). He received a Fulbright fellowship (COMEXUS 2013-2014) to conduct archival research for his current book project on African descendants in nineteenth-century Mexico and served as a postdoctoral fellow through the Consortium for Faculty Diversity. His current manuscript project engages the position of African descendants in the port city of Veracruz through the lens of mobility, citizenship, and belonging in the nascent nation.

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Check out the 1-minute trailer on the Literacy Project Films Youtube Channel

The event combines the debut screening of Silvio Rodriguez: Mi primera tarea, with a TRIBUTE CONCERT to Silvio Rodriguez.

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Central America, People and the Environment Educator Institute 2021

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This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment.

While at Tulane, the institute will explore the historic connections between the United States and Central America focusing on indigenous communities and environment while highlighting topics of social justice and environmental conservation. Join us to explore Central America and teaching strategies to implement into the classroom.

Additional details and registration will be available in the late fall 2020. For more information, please email dwolteri@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.