Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

2001-2002 Events Archive

August 1st, 2001 - August 1st, 2002

Symposia & Conferences

Brazil Week 2001, September 10-13, 2001

  • Panel on Contemporary Brazilian Politics, September 10, 5:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • The Military Under Collor, Franco, and Cardoso. Jorge Zerverucha
  • Reforms and Elections in Brazil: 1998-2000-2002. David Fleischer
  • Film: The Hour of the Star, directed by Suzana Amaral, September 11, 5:30pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Panel on Culture, Society, and Science in Brazil, September 12, 5:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Science, Nature and Race: A Comparative Analysis of Two Projects sponsored by UNESCO in Brazil (1946-1952), Marcos Chor Maio
  • Gender and Sexuality Among Youth From a Favela in Rio, Simone Monteiro
  • Film: Tudo e Brasil, directed by Rogerio Sganzerla, September 13, 7:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A

Sponsors: Tulane’s Global Village, Newcomb College for Research on Women, Tulane’s History Department, Brazilian Studies Council of Tulane, and Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

The Centenary of the Famous 41: Sexuality and Social Control in Latin America, 1901, November 15-17, 2001

On November 17, 1901, Mexico City police raided a private party, arresting its 41 attendees, all men, many of them dressed as women. The resulting scandal incited an explosion of the nascent discourse on homosexuality in Mexico at a time when, throughout Latin America, decadent modernist poets and naturalist novelists, positivist criminologists and psychiatrists, scandal sheet journalists and illustrators, along with their readers, had become fascinated with issues of sexuality. Schedule

Sponsors: Tulane University’s Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies; Tulane University Center for Scholars; Department of Spanish and Portuguese; Department of History’s Georges Lurcy Fund; Office of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Life; Office of the Provost; The Graduate School; Loyola University Women’s Resource Center and Women’s Studies Committee.

17th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies: Reaching Underserved Trauma Survivors Through Community- Based Programs, December 6-9, 2001

The 2001 Annual Meeting of the ISTSS in New Orleans will focus on reaching underserved trauma survivors through community-based programs. A major aim of the meeting is to feature and encourage collaborations at all levels. This effort will further our scientific and applied knowledge toward the goals of preventing and reducing exposure to traumatic experiences and of improving the lives of trauma survivors worldwide.

The current epidemic of trauma on every continent demands a better understanding of those community-based trauma interventions that are most effective for preventing and ameliorating the impact of traumatic exposure among large groups of survivors. How best to deliver these services, given the context of myriad obstacles that typically confront both trauma survivors and those who attempt to serve them, are important issues that need to be addressed. Such knowledge necessarily comes from collaborations between community-based service providers, researchers, advocates, policymakers, and trauma survivors themselves. The events of September 11th will be highlighted.

The Postcolonial: Literature, Theory in Africa and the African Diaspora, December 7-8, 2001

The First Symposium on the International Human Rights of Women February 22, 2002

The symposium will focus on two important and timely topics: 1) how economic development affects the human rights of women and 2) asylum and immigration law in relation to violations of women’s human rights. Political asylum expert Irena Lieberman, Director of Legal Services for the Tahirih Justice Center, Washington, D.C., will be the keynote speaker for the free symposium. Other speakers include Catherine Lampard, Director of Tulane Law School’s Immigration Law Clinic; Lawrence B. Fabacher II, Senior Partner of Lawrence B. Fabacher II law firm, Professor of Immigration Law at Tulane and Loyola Law Schools; Sue Headlee, Assistant Professor of Economics at American University, Washington, D.C., author of The Cost of Being Female Barbara Major, Executive Director of the St. Thomas Health Clinic, Core Trainer for the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond in New Orleans; Leslie Snider, Director of the Mental Health and Anthropology Track in the Department of International Health and Development, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; Brooke deMontluzin, Attorney for Catholic Charities Legal/Resettlement Services in New Orleans.

Sponsored by the International Law Society, Human Rights Law Society, and Law Women’s Association of Tulane University Law School.

Mellon Symposium: Harnessing the Cosmic Beat: How the Ancient Maya Wrote & Built What They Saw in the Sky
February 28, 2002, 7:00pm-12:00pm, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium

In this illustrated lecture Anthony Aveni, Visiting Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Tulane, will focus on the contributions of Archaeoastronomy to our understanding of Ancient Maya Culture. His talk brings together evidence from both the written and the unwritten record that attests to the long Maya love affair with the cosmos and the remarkable intellectual achievements that stemmed from it among Mayan astronomers. Innovations detailed in his overview are a mathematical system that used a zero long before their European counterpart and the construction of specialized sacred buildings, with alignments that followed the course of the planet Venus to an accuracy of one day in 500 years. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Public Relations Office at 865-5210. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies.

Deciphering & Dating the Madrid Codex, a Pre-Columbian Maya Document
March 1-2, 2002, 8:30am-5:00pm, Diboll Conference Center

This conference, organized by Mellon Visiting Professor of the Humanities, Dr. Anthony Aveni (Anthropology) and Tulane Anthropology Tulane Ph.D. graduate, Gabrielle Vail. Papers will deal with such topics as: how the structure of Pre-Columbian almanacs marks important ritual events and offers prognostications; parallel or cognate almanacs from other parts of Mesoamerica: similarities between Maya and central Mexican “books”, and advances in reading the enigmatic Maya hieroglyphic texts. Schedule

Sponsored by the Tulane’s Department of Anthropology and Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

7th Annual Tulane Environmental Law Conference: Environment 2002 Law, Science and the Public Interest
March 8 & 9, 2002, 6329 Freret Street, Tulane Law School

This conference brings academic, practical and popular perspectives to current issues including human rights and environmental justice, environmental crimes, urban environmental policy, energy conservation, and water law and coastal issues. Schedule

Sponsored by the Tulane Environmental Law Society, the Tulane Institute for Environmental Law and Policy, and the Tulane Center for Ethics in Public Administration.

Performances of the Caribbean Symposium, March 13 &14, 2002

Speakers and performers consider performances as act, masquerade and intervention and address how it communicates social and religious values, elicits identification and forges a sense of community in the Caribbean and the Caribbean Diaspora. Schedule

Sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane
University.

First International Congress of the Bolivian Studies Association, March 14-16, 2002

Topics include globalization, postnationalism, neoregionalism, Indigenous movement, Colonial Studies, politics of race, gender and ethnicity, cultural politics in educational reforms, indigneismo, genre studies in literature, cultural theory, popular culture (film, music, radio, television), urban and environmental studies, linguistics, architecture, photography, and any aspect of natural history and biomedical sciences. Bolivianists include: Jesús Urzagasti, Xavier Albo, Ana Rebeca Prada, Elizabeth Monasterios, Mario Miranda Pacheco, Zues Tapia, Edmundo Paz-Soldán, Hugo Pope, Marcia Stephenson, Kevin Healey, Guillermo Delgado, Carlos Arrien.
Schedule

Title VIA Meeting: Cultural Heritage and Preservation – Challenges in the New Millennium, March 26, 2002

Reclaiming the Spirits: Art and Healing in Haitian Vodou, April 3, 2002

Spirituality and Healing in Haitian Vodou, Margaret Armand, 5:00-6:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Those wandering spirits in Edouard Duval Carrie’s Art Work, Edourd Duval Carrie, 6:00-7:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Generously sponsored by the GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (GSSA), Committee on Visual Culture, Newcomb Art Gallery, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Program in Africa and Diaspora Studies

5th Annual Cultural Encounters Conference: Identities, Borders and Gender, April 4-6, 2002

This conference will explore issues of identity, borders, and gender in all areas and periods of Latin American culture, society, politics, language and literature in both Latin America and the U.S. Schedule

First Annual Tulane Maya Symposium and Workshop: Archaeology, Astronomy, and Texts from the Northern Maya Lowlands, November 1-3, 2002
Join archaeologists and epigraphers at Tulane University in New Orleans for an in-depth exploration of current excavations and decipherments from the Yucatan Peninsula. Saturday, November 2nd will feature a series of lectures on topics ranging from astronomy in the Maya codices, new discoveries at Mayapán, and astronomical orientations in site planning and architecture.

Seminar & Film Series

Embracing the Market: Origins and Consequences of Latin America’s Economic Reforms Guest Seminar Series, Spring 2002

Ethnobotany Luncheon Series, Fall 2001

Faculty Luncheon Seminar Series, September 2001-April 2002
Monthly presentations of Latin American Studies faculty members’ research.

  • Elizabeth Boone, Chair of the Latin American Studies Art History Department; Bill Balee, Anthropology Department, September 24
  • James D. Huck, Latin American Studies Department; Duncan Irschick, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, October 29
  • Carlos Augusto Santos Neves, Brazilian Consul General, Houston, February 25

LARC Fall Film Series, Fall 2001

The detailed listing of the films for this series is included under professional development below. Although designed for teachers, faculty, and TA’s, students are welcome to attend.

Latin Americanist Book Club, Fall 2001

  • Breath, Eyes, Memory, Edwidge Danticat. November 9, 5:00 – 7:00pm, Jones Hall Patio
  • The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts, Louis de Bernieres. December 14, 2001, 5:00 – 7:00pm, Jones Hall Patio

Latin American Library Instruction Seminar Series, Fall 2001

Bibliographic Instruction. Paul Bary, 4th floor, Howard Tilton Library, October 5, 12:00pm, October 10, 2:00pm, October 24, 3:00pm, November 2, 11:00am, November 8, 12:00pm, November 15, 12:00pm

Latin American Political Economy’s Embracing the Market: Origins and Consequences of Latin America’s Economic Reforms Guest Lecture Series
Spring 2002

  • The Hegemony of U.S. Economic Doctrines in Latin America, Paul Drake, Dean of Division of Social Sciences, Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego. March 18, 10:30am-12:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Post-Traumatic Texts as Therapeutic Events, Randy Fertel, Independent Scholar, April 11th, 5:15pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Remembrance and Forgetting of Brazil’s Dirty War, Anthony Pereira, Political Science, Tulane University, April 23, 5:15pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Center for Scholars, the Murphy Institute of Political Economy.

Latin American Studies Film Series, Spring 2002

Latin Divas: A Film Series, Spring 2002

Newcomb Colloquium in the Visual Arts, Fall 2001

Rare Footage: Women Through the Global Lens Film Series, Fall 2001

  • La Boda. Directed by Hannah Weyer (2000), Sponsored by Newcomb Center for Research on Women, November 19, 7:00-9:30pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center
  • Performing the Border. Directed by Ursula Biemann (1999), Sponsored by Newcomb Center for Research on Women, November 19, 9:30-12:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Searching for Identity in Latin American Film Series, Fall 2001

Trauma, Memory and Human Rights, Spring 2002

Working in Emergency and Disaster Settings, Spring 2002

  • Working with the Military in Emergency and Disaster Settings. Lieutenant Colonel Ferdinand Irizarry, Chief of Civil Affairs/Civil-Military Operations Division, US Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School; and Nancy Mock, DrPH, Professor, Complex Emergency and Disaster Management Program, Department of International Health and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, March 10, 9:00am-5:00pm, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tidewater Building, 1440 Canal Street, Room 1210
  • Personal Security in Emergency and Disaster Settings. Robert MacPherson, Director of the Security and Protection Group, CARE, March 18, 3:00-6:00pm, School of Public Heath and Tropical Medicine, Tidewater Building, 1441 Canal Street, Room 1201

Sponsored by the Tulane Payson Center for International Development and Technology Transfer, and the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM), Department of International Health and Development, Complex Emergency and Disaster Management Program.

Student Events

Lectures

Distinguished Visitors & Special Events

Professional Development

Performances & Exhibits

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Upcoming Events

Film Screening: El Súper with filmmaker Iván Acosta

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The 1979 film version of Cuban filmmaker Ivan Acosta’s award-winning play El Súper, which gained critical and international success for its depiction of exiled Cubans in New York City, will be screened. Mr. Acosta will be in attendance and a discussion in English will follow. Iván Acosta is a playwright, filmmaker, and creative director originally from Santiago de Cuba, now in New York City. His creative endeavors include documentaries, plays, films, and books, and he’s served as writer, director, and producer, among other roles.

A small reception will follow the screening. Seating may be limited. Admission is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/1979/04/29/archives/the-screen-el-super-a-cubanamerican-tale-the-cast.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.

Equity speaker series to host panel on navigating immigrant relations in the current political climate

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The Center for Academic Equity at Tulane University is proud to present Border Li(n)es: Excluding, Extracting, and Expelling Immigrants in the Southern U.S. on September 25, 2018 at 7:00 PM as part of the Equity Speaker Series.

Following a summer of turbulent immigration relations in the United States, the Fall 2018 Equity Speaker Panel will focus on immigration on our Southern border and will feature specialists whose experiences vary from grassroots to professorial work. Panelists will include Josiah Heyman, Director of the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Ronald Martinez, New Orleans immigrant activist and spokesperson for the Congress of Day Laborers, Hiroko Kusuda, Clinical Professor and Director of Immigration Law at the Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice at Loyola, and Laila Hlass, Clinical Professor of Law at Tulane Law School and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

These four distinguished speakers will share the stage of Freeman Auditorium to discuss the drastic variation in immigrant relations across the national, regional, and local spaces and ways that members of American society may become engaged in or change the now toxic and polarized political climate. This inaugural discussion will be followed by a question and answer session.

See also Tulane New Wave for more information and a description of the event.




Cover photo from CNN story What the US-Mexico border looks like before Trump’s wall.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features Hispanic women artists' empowerment and identity

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation is proud to announce the opening of the groundbreaking exhibition Hispanic Women Making Art: Creative Empowerment and Identity. The exhibition will feature artists Verónica Bapé, Belinda Flores-Shinshillas, Ana Hernandez, Josephine Sacabo, Laura Velez and Luba Zygarewicz and is curated by Marcela Correa, MFA.

The opening reception will be held on September 26 from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM. The exhibition will be open beginning September 26 and continue through November 24, 2018. For more information, please visit the Mexican Cultural Institute website.

Cover photo is a work by Verónica Bapé from the series ABUNDANTE COSA 1 MES 1 ARTISTA.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.


Iván Acosta book presentation: With A Cuban Song in the Heart / Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón

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Iván Acosta will present his memoir, With a Cuban Song in the Heart/ Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón, published by Un-Gyve Press, 2017. At this event, Mr. Acosta will incorporate his favorite Cuban songs in a musical and historical journey. His book features artwork from 280 album covers in his private collection and weaves a rich narrative combining real life experiences from his childhood in Santiago, Cuba along with tidbits of local lore and historical references. His favorite songs will be performed by local performers during the presentation.
This fascinating presentation, starting at 6:00PM, will be held at Tulane University in the Freeman Auditorium of the Newcomb Art Building (in Newcomb Circle) New Orleans, LA, 70118. A book signing and reception will follow on Woodward Way, right outside the Freeman Auditorium and in the Newcomb Art Museum. The book will be available for purchase for $60.00.

This event is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/16/nyregion/public-lives-cuba-on-his-mind-the-dual-life-of-an-artist-exile.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.

K-12 Educator Workshop Celebrating 25 Years of the Américas Award with 2018 winners Ibi Zoboi and Duncan Tonatiuh

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This year marks the 25th year that the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs and CLASP will honor the work of the many authors, illustrators, publishers, educators, and readers of the award with 2018 award winners Ibi Zoboi and Duncan Tonatiuh.

Zoboi’s book, American Street is a complex and multi-layered story anchored around relationships and questions of loyalty. She will share her experiences writing this book and provide context for teaching this book in a high school classroom.

The second 2018 award winner by Duncan Tonatiuh, Danza is a magnificent celebration of Amalia Hernández, the dancer and choreographer who founded the famed Mexican dance company, el Ballet Folklórico de México. Tonatiuh will share with educators his unique illustrative style and engage participants in an exploration of Amalia Hernández and her impact in the world of dance. This picture book is the perfect book for every library.

The workshop will explore this year’s winners, providing guidance and resources that span the 25 years of the award. This special 25th anniversary workshop will focus on diversity and the role of community.

Co-sponsored by the national Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP), Howard University, and Teaching for Change. Organized by the Center for Latin American Studies, Vanderbilt University and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.

Celebración Latina at the Audubon Zoo

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In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, please join us at the Audubon Zoo for the 2018 Celebración Latina family festival to explore and celebrate the rich diversity of Latin America. Celebración Latina, presented by Pan-American Life Insurance Group, will be held at the Zoo’s Capital One Stage and Field. It will offer a true taste of the Latin American culture with live music, children’s activities, and authentic Latin cuisine prepared and sold by local restaurants. Local artisans will sell hand crafts, and local social service, health, and education organizations will offer wellness, education, and social service information.

Celebración Latina is included with Zoo admission or Audubon membership. No outside food, beverages, or tents allowed. Portable chairs and blankets are welcomed.

Don’t forget to check out photos from past celebrations!

For more information, please visit the Audubon Zoo website.

Celebración Latina is sponsored in part by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Ron Austin & Associates.