Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

2003-2004 Events Archive I

August 1st, 2003 - August 4th, 2004

Symposia & Conferences

Between Race and Place: Blacks and Blackness in Central America and the Mainland Caribbean
Friday, November 12-13, 2004 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tulane University

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary and international group of scholars to challenge traditional notions of race and identity in Central America, Mexico and Colombia in both the colonial and postcolonial contexsts. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, inquire at raceconf@tulane.edu or see the conference website at http://www.tulane.edu/~jwolfe/rp. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies and is sponsored by Latin American Studies and Mount Holyoke College.

Summit on Haiti
Friday, April 23, 2004, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Tulane Law School, Room 110

The recent events in Haiti, including the American intervention, have brought this political and social crisis into the world spotlight. The World Affairs Forum at Tulane University has been presented with unparalleled access to leading commentators regarding the legality of the recent intervention and the future prospects for rebuilding Haiti. Further, we are fortunate enough to have available to speak individuals who experienced the recent crisis first-hand to provide insight into what really happened during these trying times. We look forward to presenting more insight into the situation in Haiti and the variety of opinions and visions for the future of this important country. This event is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University Law School, Tulane Law School International Law Society, Foreign Lawyers at Tulane University, Tulane Law School Federalist Society, Payson Graduate Students Association, Tulane Law School Human Rights Society.

Panel One Subject: Intervention in Haiti
10:00 AM – 11:45 AM
MODERATOR: Professor Richard Watts, Tulane University
Dr. William Bertrand, Payson Center, Tulane University
Professor Pierre Marie Paquiot, President, State University of Haiti
Mr. Ira Kurzban, Attorney to Mr. Jean-Bertrand Aristide
Mr. Larry Birns, Council for Hemispheric Affairs
Mr. Herve Saintilus, Federation
Mr. Gervais Charles, Attorney, Group of 184

Panel Two Subject: Future of Haiti
1:00 PM – 2:45 PM
MODERATOR: Professor Winston Riddick, Southern University
James Morrell, Haiti Democracy Project (TBD)
Professor Günther Handl, Tulane Law School
Professor Gelin I. Collot, Dean, Haiti Law School
Ms. Jessica Leight, Council for Hemispheric Affairs
Professor Heberne Edmond, Professor Southern University
Mr. Rene Julien, Amicale des Jurists, Haiti
Mr. Beausejour Jean Coty, Interim National Coordinator for CITPAH

7th Annual Cultural Encounters Conference
Thursday, April 15 – Saturday April 17, 2004
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tulane University

The 7th Annual Cultural Encounters Conference, “Performing the Margins: Explorations of Identities and Cultural Expressions,” explores issues of performance and marginality—including race and gender—in all areas and periods of Latin American, Spanish, or Brazilian culture, society, politics, language, literature and criticism in Latin America, Spain, Brazil, and the United States. Admission charged. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Michelle Nasser at 865-5518 or mnasser@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by: Graduate Students Association, Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Haiti: Revolutionary Legacies, Contemporary Challenges
A Symposium Commemorating the Bicentennial of the Haitian Revolution, 1804-2004
April 13-14, 2004
Tulane and Loyola Universities

The symposium features keynote addresses by two scholars on Haiti: Nick Nesbitt, Associate Professor of French at Miami University of Ohio and 2003-2004 Mellon Fellow at Cornell University; and Michel Laguerre, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Berkeley Center for Globalization and Information Technology at the University of California-Berkeley. It also features the work of Haitian historical painter Ulrick Jean-Pierre. All events are free and open to the public. View the schedule

Sponsored by the Deep South Regional Humanities Center at Tulane

Conference on Critical Perspectives of Neoliberal Reform in the Americas
Saturday, March 27th, 2004, 9:00AM – 4:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tulane University

In the 1980s and 90s, Latin American governments, under pressure from the United States and international financial institutions such as the IMF
and World Bank, implemented a wave of social and economic reform policies. These policies, known as Neoliberal reforms, entailed the opening of economies to foreign investors and companies, elimination of trade barriers in the interest of “free” trade, privatization of state-owned companies, and slashing of social spending in order to balance the budget and repay debt. This conference takes a critical look at Neoliberalism, analyzes why the reforms have failed the Latin and North American people, and explores the alternatives to Neoliberalism. Presenters include Mark Weisbrot who will speak on “Implications of Latin America’s Economic Growth Failure Over the Last Quarter-Century,” Thomas Palley who will speak on “Reshaping Development Policy in the Wake of the Washington Consensus,” and Arturo López-Calleja who will speak on “Cuba, Lessons from a Non-neoliberal Transition.” In addition, there will be roundtable discussions on alternatives to Neoliberalism and the effects of Neoliberalism in Louisiana (e.g. shrimp and sugar industries, spending cuts in health care, education, and public housing). This event is free and open to the public. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. For more information, contact Joseph at jwildera@tulane.edu or 861-7448.

Second Annual Gulf South Summit
Wednesday, March 24 – 26, 2004, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
New Orleans, Louisiana
Admission charged. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Barbara Moely at 504.862.3322 or moely@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies.

Caribbean Soundscapes: A Conference on Caribbean Musics and Culture
March 12-14, 2004, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tulane University

Popular music has often been singled out as a central defining
characteristic of the Caribbean imaginary. This conference responds to the
need to expand our scholarly paradigms in this area, recognizing intense
regional transnationalization and change in the region in recent years.
Speakers and participants will address several key questions: what is the
significance of the Caribbean as a specific locale for the production and
circulation of popular music? What role does popular music play in the
creation and continued performance of national identities throughout the
circum-Caribbean and other zones, such as continental Latin America,
northern North America, and Europe? The conference will feature several
plenary speakers, among them Prof. Gerard Béhague (University of Texas at
Austin) and Prof. Juan Flores (Hunter College, CUNY). Further details
about the conference will be available on line at http://cuba.tulane.edu
Admission charged. This event is open to the public. For more information,
call or e-mail Ana M. López at 504.862.8629 or lopez@tulane.edu
respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is
sponsored by: Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute and the Department of
Music.

Second Annual Tulane Maya Symposium and Workshop: Cities and Towns of the Ancient Maya North in Classic Times
October 31-November 2, 2003
You are invited to join archaeologists and specialists in hieroglyphic decipherment in New Orleans for a weekend of lectures, discussions, and workshops focusing on recent discoveries about the Classic Period (A.D. 250-900) in the Northern Maya Lowlands. Click here for complete schedule and registration information.

Creole Legacies: The Current Status and Future Prospects of Creole Studies Research
October 23-25, 2003, All Day
Tulane University and the Radisson New Orleans

The Creole Studies Consortium, a partnership of Tulane University’s Deep South Regional Humanities Center and Northwestern State University’s
Louisiana Creole Heritage Center, is pleased to host the conference “Creole Legacies: The Current Status and Future Prospects of Creole Studies Research.” The conference is interdisciplinary in nature and will include Creole family history exhibits as well as scholarly presentations on a wide range of topics, including music, art, architecture, history, literature, language, and folklife. The conference will begin with a keynote address
by Nick Spitzer, host of the syndicated radio music show “American Routes” and a specialist in Louisiana Creole culture. Dr. Spitzer’s address will
take place in Tulane’s Freeman Auditorium on Thursday, Oct. 23 at 4:00 p.m., with a reception following. The keynote address is free and open to
the public. The conference will continue on October 24 and 25 at the Radisson New Orleans. It will conclude on Saturday evening with a Creole
Soirée featuring music by Al ‘Lil Fats’ Jackson and zydeco great Willis Prudhomme. For more information or to register for the conference, visit http://www.nsula.edu/creole/

Twelfth Annual Symposium on Business and Society- “Public Corruption and Private Enterprise”
Friday, October 24, 2003, 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Dixon Hall

Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call A. B. Freeman School of Business at 865.5662. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by the A.B. Freeman School of Business.

*Seminar & Film Series *

Latin American Film Series
Spring 2004
Latin American Studies Annual Film Series continues this semester with a new selection of noteworthy films and documentaries. The LAS Film Series is scheduled for most Thursday evenings at 7pm in 102 Jones Hall. For more information and a list of upcoming films visit the LAS Film Series web page.

Highlights this Spring include:

  • April 1- Four Days in September – A group of Brazilian students kidnap the American ambassador as an act of resistance against their right-wing military government, but the emotional tension soon wears a crack in their starry-eyed idealism. Nominated for Best Foreign Film at the Academy Awards.
  • April 22- Balseros – This Documentary began as a Spanish TV newsmagazine story covering 15 Days in August 1994, when Fidel Castro allowed Cubans to sail off the island in homemade vessels. Documentarians Carles Bosch and Jose Maria Domenech followed the progress of seven Cubans as they received exit visas and job offers courtesy of the USA Catholic Conference.

Political Economy of Neoliberal Reform in Latin America
Saturday, March 27, 2004
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

Thomas Palley of the Open Society Institute, Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and Arturo Lopez-Levy, a Cuban economist, will lecture as a follow-up seminar on the Political Economy of Neoliberal Reform in Latin America. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, e-mail Monika Gerhart at bellcreekme@YAHOO.COM. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: GSSA, LAGO, and the Political Science Graduate Organization.

Pedro Guibovich Perez Seminar (in Spanish)
Thursday, March 25, 5:30 pm – 7:00 PM
Latin American Library, 4th Floor
Howard Tilton Memorial Library

Dr. Pedro Guibovich Perez will conduct the seminar “Para una historia del libro y la lectura en América española, siglos XVI-XVIII” (in Spanish). Enrollment is limited to twenty; please mail sign-up requests to jcharles@tulane.edu. Guibovich Pérez (Ph.D., Columbia) is a leading historian of colonial Spanish America, distinguished faculty member in the Department of Humanities at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, and 2003-2004 research fellow of the Center for Study of the History of the Book and Media at Princeton University. He has edited and authored numerous publications on colonial conquest and evangelization, the Peruvian Inquisition, and the early modern book trade, including “La inquisición y la censura de libros en el Perú virreinal (1570- 1813)”(Lima: Ediciones del Congreso de la República, 2000). Admission is free of charge. This event is open only to members of the Tulane Community. For more information, call or e-mail John Charles or Hortensia Calvo at 862-3407, 865-5681 or jcharles@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese and The Latin American Library.

Casa Argentina Film Series
Friday, March 5, 2004, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Jones Hall, Room 102

“Herencia” es una comedia dramatica sobre la vida de 2 inmigrantes que llegan a Buenos Aires en epocas diferentes. Olinda, llega de Italia despues de la segunda guerra mundial, siguiendo los pasos de un amor que nunca encontrara. A pesar de su fracaso, adopta a Buenos Aires como su ciudad y trabaja en una fonda humilde que es de su propiedad. Peter, llega de Alemania buscando un amor que conocio anos atras. En su busqueda se cruza a Olinda, y su intercambio de experiencias hace que puedan rehacer sus vidas buscando un lugar en el mundo. Escrita y dirigida por Paula Hernandez y cuenta con las actuaciones de Rita Cortese, Adrian Witzke, Martin Adjemian y Hector Anglada entre otros.La pelicula cuenta con subtitulos en ingles.

“Heritage” is a comedy about the lives of two immigrants who arrive to Buenos Aires at different times. Olinda comes from Italy after the Second World War looking for a love she never finds. Despite her failure, she adopts Buenos Aires as her city and makes a living on a small plot of land. Peter arrives from Germany looking for a woman he met years earlier. In his search he finds Olinda and their shared experiences allow them to rediscover their lives as they explore their place in the world. Written and directed by Paula Hernandez; starring Rita Cortese, Adrian Witzke, Martin Adjemian and Hector Anglada. In Spanish with English subtitles Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, e-mail Luz Caputto at scaputto2@cox.net. The event is sponsored by: Casa Argentina.

Casa Argentina Film Series
Friday, February 6, 2004, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Jones Hall, Room 102

Les Luthiers hacen Muchas Gracias de Nada/ Les Luthiers Make Much Ado About Nothing (1979). Les Luthiers, a famous group of Argentine comedians/musicians, made this well-known film at the height of their popularity in 1979. Many of the pieces they performed for this film have become classics of Argentine comedy: “El rey enamorado” (The Lovestruck king), “La tanda televisiva,” and “La gallina dijo Eureka” (The Chicken Cried Eureka!) highlight this special brand of humor and musical talent. Les Luthiers create their own musical instruments and are synonymous with the Argentine sense of wit and irony. In Spanish with English subtitles. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Elizabeth VanSant at 865-5164 or evansa@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by: Casa Argentina.

Ecology and Conservation In the New World Tropics
Spring 2004 Seminar Series
Seminars begin at 12:15 in Alcee Fortier 301.
All events are open to the public.
Refreshments will be served prior to lectures.
Schedule

Argentine Film Series
Friday, November 7, 2003, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Jones Hall, Room 102

Film: Felcidades (Argentina 2000) Director: Lucho Bender Starring: Pablo Cedron, Gaston Pauls, Silke Featuring: Carlos Belloso, Luis Machin, Marcelo Mazzarello In Spanish with English subtitles. 100 minutes Some lonely souls in Buenos Aires all try to make the best of it on one hot, muggy Christmas Eve when a series of wry coincidences forces them to cross paths sometimes without even knowing it. An overworked stand up comic can’t make his audience laugh. A writer ruins all his relationships with women despite his commercial successes. A father is desperate to find his son the latest robot toy that’s sold out of every store in town. A shy and handsome young doctor can’t relate to women. A lonely handicapped artist wants to relate to other people and make a friend. And a hardened cop tries to make the best of it in a corrupt police force. All of these stories and more emerge from the humming heat of a black Buenos Aires night like blood sucking bats from an abandoned church. In his debut film about love, loss, desperation, and desire Lucho Bender, an internationally acclaimed director of commercials, reveals a style and sensibility that shares Robert Altman’s genius for interweaving the lives of many and Jim Jarmusch’s depiction of alienation and wackiness. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Elizabeth Van Sant at 504.865.5164 or evansa@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by: Casa Argentina

Caribbean Film Series
Wednesday, October 22, 2003
06:30 PM – 07:30 PM
Jones Hall, Room 204

La Ultima Rumba de Papa Montero (The Last Rumba of Papa Montero) (1992,
Martinique/Cuba) Dir. Octavio Cortazar 52 min. Subtitled in English. A
celebration of rumba as Cuba’s heart and soul, this mock docudrama tells
the story of Papa Montero, a “famous” rumba dancer assassinated during
carnival. The film presents Cuban traditions and everyday life told through
beautiful images, sensual music, dance, and a passionate love story. The
joy of Montero is how director Cortazar brings ordinary events (domino
playing, gossip) to life through graceful song and dance as the rumba
becomes the cry of a group collective. Admission is free of charge. This
event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Christina
Sisk at 504.862.8629 or csisk@tulane.edu respectively. This event is being
hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

Latin American Film Series
Fall 2003
Latin American Studies Annual Film Series continues this year with many new and noteworthy films and documentaries. The LAS Film Series is scheduled for most Thursday evenings at 7pm in 102 Jones Hall. For more information and a list of upcoming films visit the LAS Film Series web page.

Highlights this Fall include:

  • SEPTEMBER 12- The new Frida, directed by Julie Taymor (Titus, 1998) starring Salma Hayek.
  • OCTOBER 9 – Senorita Extraviada, by director Lourdes Portillo (Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza De Mayo, 1985) investigates the disappearance of nearly 200 women along the US-Mexico border in this award winning documentary.

Hidden In Plain Sight
Thursday, October 16, 2003, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Freeman Auditorium

Director John Smihula will be on hand to discuss
the SOA, activism and film making. His film looks at the School of the
Americas (now the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation)
through a gripping account of the atrocities that happen at the hands of
its graduates. Narrated by Martin Sheen, Hidden in Plain Sight has
received praise across the country for its depiction of the SOA and how
Father Roy (of Lafayette, LA) and hundreds of others descend of this Fort
Benning, Georgia training facility each year to protest its existence.
Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more
information, call or e-mail Elizabeth Van Sant at 504.865.5164 or
evansa@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin
American Studies, and is sponsored by: TIDES.

Student Events

Pre-Ph.D. Workshop
Friday, April 30, 2004, 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail James Huck at 504.865.5164 or jhuck@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies.

Model OAS Panel Presentation
Thursday, April 22, 2004, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall

The delegation of 8 undergraduate students who represented the country of Honduras in the university Model of the Organization of American States in Washington, DC April 4-9 of this year will present a panel discussion of their experience. This is the first delegation Tulane has sent to the Model since 1990 and this year’s team was generously funded by Newcomb and Tulane Colleges, the AB Freeman School of Business, the Office of the Provost, the Office of Student Affairs, and the Stone Center and has received the support of the Honduran Consul in New Orleans and the Honduran Mission to the OAS. Tulane was one of approximately 25 universities from the US, Canada, Guatemala, and Argentina that participated in the model at the OAS headquarters. The Tulane/Honduras team invites everyone to come and hear about their preparations for and participation in the Edgar Maya Model of the Organization of American States. Refreshments will be served. This event is open to the public. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies.

Latin American Studies Honors Student Roundtable
Friday, April 16, 2004, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Robert Cudd Hall

Latin American Studies honors students Kimberlyn Owens-Hughes, Wendy Blake, Matt Tavares, David Kinney, and Leah Spivey will present their research at an informal roundtable over lunch. Topics range from representation of women in Isabel Allende’s novels to the drug culture in urban Brazil. Po-boys will be served. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Stone Center for Latin American Studies at 865-5164 or rtsclas@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by the Honors Program.

Study in Latin America Summer 2004 – Open House
Tuesday, March 9 from 4:00 – 6:00 PM
100A Jones Hall
Summer Program Application Deadline: March 26, 2004
Information – dramil@tulane.edu
Options

Thesis Writing Workshop
Thursday, January 22, 4:00-5:00 PM, Greenleaf Conference Room
January 23, 2:00 -3:00 PM, Greenleaf Conference Room

At these workshops we will go over deadlines, committee selections, scheduling, etc., and will answer any technical or content questions students may have. Current thesis writers as well as future thesis writers are all welcomed. Please RSVP if you plan to attend and which of the sessions you will attend. Both workshops will cover the same information.

First Annual Tulane Undergraduate Conference on Latin America
Fall Semester 2003
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall

This month-long conference will showcase the latest research of the undergraduate majors in Latin American Studies at Tulane University. Graduating seniors have been grouped into thematic panels and perspectives from which to investigate what they have identified as the most pressing issues facing modern Latin America. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Elizabeth Van Sant at 504.865.5164 or evansa@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies. Schedule for Tulane Undergraduate Conference on Latin America.

Brown Bag Series Summer Field Research Presentations
Monday, November 10, 2003, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall

Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more
information, call or e-mail Trevor Top at 504.813.7138 or
trevtop@yahoo.com respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin
American Studies.

TULASO Meeting
Tuesday, September 9, 2003, 6:00 PM – 07:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tulane University Latin American Studies Organization will hold its first meeting on Tuesday, September 9, 2003. For more information, call or e-mail Elizabeth Van Sant at 504.865.5164 or evansa@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies and is sponsored by TULASO.

New Graduate Student Orientation
August 25-26, 2003

Lectures

Julio Tavares Lecture
Wednesday, May 5, 2004, 2:00 – 4:00 PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room
Julio Tavares lecture on Brazilian Hip Hop. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Christopher Dunn at 504.865.5518 or cjdunn@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Dr. Tom Turner Lecture
Friday, April 30, 2004, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Alcee Fortier Hall, Room 301
Dr. Tom Turner of the University of New Mexico will present “Demography
and Conservation Genetics of the Endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow.”
Refreshments will be served prior to the lecture. Admission is free of
charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or
e-mail Dr. Hank Bart at 865-5191 or piscine@tulane.edu respectively. The
event is sponsored by: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

How do Languages Find the Best Word Order?
Thursday, April 8, 2004, 5:00 – 6:30 PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

George Aaron Broadwell will give the lecture “How Do Languages Find the Best Word Order? A Look at Optimality Theory and three MesoAmerican Languages — Kaqchikel, Trique, and Zapotec.” Professor Broadwell is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics at the State University of New York at Albany. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Martha Huggins at 862-3012 or mhuggins@tulane.edu, or Judie Maxwell at 862-3046 or maxwell@tulane.edu. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies.

Huggins and Avelar Lecture
Tuesday, April 6, 2004, 4:00 – 6:00PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

Professors Idelber Avelar and Martha Huggins will give lectures in an event entitled “Violence: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue.” Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Idelber Avelar at 865-5518 or iavelar@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Brazilian Studies Council.

Syto Cavé Lecture
Thursday, April 1, 2004, 4:00 – 5:30PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

The third installment for the African and African Diaspora Studies Spring 2004 Lecture Series will feature Haitian writer and director, Syto Cavé. Mr. Cavé will read an excerpt from one of his plays and will also talk about the recent political events transpiring in Haiti. A reception will follow in the Jones Hall patio. This event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Dean’s Center for Scholars, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies; Department of Theater and Dance; Department of French and Italian; Cuban & Caribbean Studies Institute; and African and African Diaspora Studies. For more information, please contact adst@tulane.edu or 862-3550.

Pedro Guibovich Perez Lecture
Friday, March 26, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Latin American Library, 4th Floor
Howard Tilton Memorial Library

Dr. Pedro Guibovich Perez will give the lecture “Conflicting Customs: Forbidden Books and Inquisition in Late Colonial Peru.” Guibovich Pérez (Ph.D., Columbia) is a leading historian of colonial Spanish America, distinguished faculty member in the Department of Humanities at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, and 2003-2004 research fellow of the Center for Study of the History of the Book and Media at Princeton University. He has edited and authored numerous publications on colonial conquest and evangelization, the Peruvian Inquisition, and the early modern book trade, including “La inquisición y la censura de libros en el Perú virreinal (1570-1813)” (Lima: Ediciones del Congreso de la República, 2000). Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail John Charles or Hortensia Calvo at 862-3407, 865-5681 or jcharles@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and The Latin American Library.

John W. Scott Lecture
Thursday, March 25, 2004, 06:00 PM – 08:00 PM
Freeman Auditorium, Room 205, Woldenberg Art Center
Dr. John W. Scott will present “William Spratling and the French Quarter Renaissance” complementing the on- going exhibition at the Newcomb Art Gallery entitled “Maestros de Plata: William Spratling and the Mexican Silver Renaissance.” Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Newcomb Art Gallery at 865-5328. The event is sponsored by: Newcomb Art Gallery, Woldenberg Art Center, Latin American Library.

Katherine Donato Lecture
Wednesday, March 24, 2004, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Favrot Room in the McAlister Auditorium Building
Katherine Donato will be giving a lecture entitled, “Sex Differences in Child Health: Essects of Mexico-U.S. Migration”. This event is free of charge and open to the public. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Beth Fussell at (504) 865-5820. This event is sponsored by: Beth Fussell.

Patricia Mohammed Lecture
Monday, March 22, 2004, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room
Dr. Patricia Mohammed of the University of the West Indies will give the lecture “A Different Imagination: Reinterpreting Caribbean Visual Iconography Incorporating a Gender Lens.” There is a linear progression of a visual metaphor from Boticelli’s Venus to the popular Caribbean stereotype of the “native washer women” and “market women”. This lecture discusses and decodes some images from the 18th century to contemporary 20th century taking its point of departure from this European Renaissance construction of woman in art, reading this from the view of an emergent Caribbean iconography. Dr. Mohammed is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. Dr. Mohammed holds a BA in Arts and General Studies from the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine; M.Sc. Sociology from the University of the West Indies and Ph. D. Development Studies from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, Netherlands. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Stone Center for Latin American Studies at 865-5164 or rtsclas@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Newcomb Art Gallery, Art Department

Gage Averill Lecture
Monday March 22, 2004, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room
Gage Averill will deliver the lecture “Alan Lomax in Haiti”. Averill is an internationally renowned ethnomusicologist and current chair of the Department of Music at New York University. He is the author of A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey: Popular Music and Power in Haiti (University of Chicago Press. 1997) and most recently Four Parts, No Waiting: A Social History of American Barbershop Harmony Harmony (Oxford University Press. 2003). Additionally, Dr. Averill edits a series on global popular music for Routledge and is editor of The Alan Lomax 1936-7 Haitian Recordings for Rounder Records. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Christopher Dunn at 865-5518 or cjdunn@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies.

Aurelio de los Reyes Lecture
Monday, March 22, 2004, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
207 Newcomb Hall
Dr. Aurelio de los Reyes will give the lecture “Latin America and Hollywood: The Case of Delores Del Rio.” Reyes is a professor of film history at the Universidad Nacional de México, Mexico City. He has been recognized as a pioneer scholar for his many books on the Mexican cinema, among them are three volumes on “Cine y sociedad en México” and one on Delores Del Rio. Reyes is one of the first researchers to apply a methodology of historical analysis to the Mexican cinema. The lecture will be in Spanish. Professor Roberto Rodriguez Moya will serve as translator. Admission is free of charge. This event is open only to members of the Tulane Community. For more information, call or e-mail Center for Latin American Studies at 865-5164 or rtsclas@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies.

Rapping Orishas: Afro-Cuban Religious Influence in Cuban Hip Hop
Thursday, March 18, 2004, 5:00 PM
Tilton Hall, Room 301
Cuba is becoming a major force in the international Hip Hop movement with high profile grammy award winning artists like “Orishas”. Afro-Cuban culture has been a defining factor in Cuban national identity and now Cuban Hip Hop artists are redefining what it means to be Black in Cuba. Join poet, writer and cultural researcher Alan West-Durán of Northeastern University to explore Hip Hop and Cuban national identity. Funded by the Dean’s Center for Scholars
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Tulane University

Katherine Donato Lecture
Wednesday, March 17, 2004, 2:00 – 3:30 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100a Jones Hall
Katherine Donato will be giving a lecture entitled, “Sex Differences in Child Health: Effects of Mexico-U.S. Migration. Mexican Migration and Health Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Beth Fussell at 504.865.5820. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: LAGO.

The Cultural Politics of Diaspora: Ways of Being Jewish in Brazil
Monday, March 15, 2004, 4:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100a Jones Hall
Nelson Vieira, Professor of Jewish Studies at Brown University is a leading figure in Luso-Brazilian Studies in the United States, having founded and developed the only Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies in the country. Professor Vieira was Director of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at Brown from 1980 to 1991 and is also an affiliate of the Center for Judaic Studies at that institution.

Penny C. Morrill Lecture and Reception
Thursday, March 4, 2004
Freeman Auditorium, Room 205, Woldenberg Art Center
Dr. Penny C. Morrill will present the opening lecture entitled “The Artistry of Modern Mexican Silver” to introduce the exhibition “Maestros de Plata: William Spratling and the Mexican Silver Renaissance” on display at the Newcomb Art Gallery March 4 – May 23, 2004. Dr. Morrill will lead a walk-through of the exhibition, and there will be a book signing session following the lecture. Admission is free of charge. Attendance is by invitation only. For more information, call Newcomb Art Gallery at 865-5328. The event is sponsored by: Newcomb Art Gallery, Woldenberg Art Center and the Latin American Library.

“Aztec Palaces” and “Ancient Earthworks at Tikal: Big and Getting Bigger”
Friday, February 20, 2004, 4:00 PM
Middle American Research Institute
Dr. Susan Evans and Dr. David Webster will present as a part of the Anthropology Colloquium. This event will take place at the Middle American Research Institute, located on the 4th floor of Dinwiddie Hall. This colloquium is being sponsored by the Middle American Research Institute, the Tulane Anthropology Student Association, and the Graduate School Student Association.

“Reinventing Carnival in the Americas”
Thursday, February 12, 2004, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Latin American Library Conference Room, 4th Floor
Howard Tilton Memorial Library
Fred Góes will present “Reinventing Carnival in the Americas,” a lecture complimenting the on-going exhibit on the same theme curated by Fred and Graça Góes. The exhibit will be open February 6-26, 2004 in the Latin American Library located on the fourth floor of the Howard Tilton Memorial Library. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Krystin Krause at 865-5681 or croaker29@yahoo.com respectively.

REBEL: A Woman Soldier of the American Civil War”
Maria Agui Carter, Rockefeller Fellow at Tulane University 2003-2004
Wednesday, February 11, 2004, 4:00 PM
Anna E. Many Lounge, Caroline Richardson Hall
Documentary filmmaker Maria Agui Carter will screen a trailer and discuss her new film REBEL about a Cuban-American teenager from New Orleans who fought as a soldier in the American Civil War. The story of Loreta Janeta Velazquez has been considered a hoax for over a hundred years, but new research indicates she did indeed exist. Who was this woman and why isn’t she part of the national narrative about the Civil War?

“Ruidos da música popular brasiliera”
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room
Wednesday, January 28, 2004, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Prof. Beatriz Resende of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro will present “Ruidos da música popular brasiliera.” Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Dr. Christopher Dunn at 865-5518 or cjdunn@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Brazilian Studies.

“Factory Takeovers, Blockades, Piquetero Television: Resistance Against the Neo-Liberal State in Argentina”
Sunday, January 25, 2004, 7:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room
Kenny Litzenberger, activist and social documentarian, has lived and
worked in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the past seven years. He will screen his short films addressing current social movements in Argentina, including worker self-management in recovered factories. In addition, he will also discuss the role of independent media, including film and pirate TV, in the upsurge of social activism in Argentina. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Joseph Wilde-Ramsing at 861-7448 or jwildera@tulane.edu

“Host-parasite patterns in avian malaria”
Friday, January 23, 2004, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
3rd Floor, Alcee Fortier, Room 301
Dr. Robert Ricklefs will lecture on “Host-parasite patterns in avian malaria”. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Tom Sherry at 865-5191 or tsherry@tulane.edu respectively. This event is sponsored by: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

“Natural extinctions: lessons from [Caribbean] island birds”
Thursday, January 22, 2004, 7:30-9:00 PM
Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, Room 205
The 2004 Edward Sturtevant Hathaway Lecturer in Natural History, Dr. Robert Ricklefs, “Natural extinctions: lessons from [Caribbean] island birds”. Reception following the lecture, Woodward Way in Woldenberg Art Center. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Tom Sherry at 865-5191 or tsherry@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

“Tejano Spice Girls: Mexican American Girls and the Production of the Next Selena”
Thursday, January 22, 2004, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Caroline Richardson Hall, 2nd Floor, Anna E. Many Lounge
Vicki Mayer lecture will lecture on the “Tejano Spice Girls: Mexican American Girls and the Production of the Next Selena”. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Newcomb College Center for Research on Women at 865-5238 or nccrow@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by: Newcomb College Center for Research on Women.

Jorge Rigau Lecture
Friday, January 16, 2004, 4:00 PM
Richardson Memorial Building, Room 305
Jorge Rigau, Dean of La Nueva Escuela de Arcquitectura at La Universidad Polytecnica de Puerto Rico will describe the curriculum at his school and some of the proposed additional topics for discussion include: Computing-appropriate expectations and timing in the curriculum, Integration of Preservation Programs into the School, thesis expectations and performance, and grading policies. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call School of Architecture at 504.865.5389. The event is sponsored by: School of Architecture.

“Making Louisiana French, 1803-2003”
Wednesday, November 19, 7:00 PM
Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Arts Center, Tulane University
Francois Weil is Director of Studies at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en
Sciences Sociales in Paris and the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Fall 2003. His most recent book, A History of New York,
will be published in translation by Columbia University Press. He is
currently at work on a book on the history of genealogy in American culture.

“Fox: Three Years Later”
Monday, November 10, 2003, 5:00 PM – 7:15 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Dr. Emilio Zebadua, PRD Congressman from Chiapas, who will be giving a
lecture entitled “Fox: Three Years Later.” Reception to follow lecture.
Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more
information, e-mail Casey Kane Love at mkane1@tulane.edu. The event is
being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department
of Political Science and GSSA.

“The Limits of Translating the Caribbean: Roberto G. Fernández and Rosario Ferré”
Thursday, October 30, 2003, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Guillermo Irizarry, a specialist in Contemporary Latin American and Caribbean literature as well as the literature and culture of the Hispanic Diaspora, will present a critique of the construction of the Caribbean region as a commodified locus of difference to be assimilated (translated) into the Global Culture. He will consider the monumental machine of processing difference (of translating) to understand its failure, and the detritus produced in the process. Lecture will be in English. Reception to follow. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Debbie Ramil at 504.862.8629 or dramil@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

“Intelectualidad y nomadismo en José Luis González”
Wednesday, October 29, 2003, 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Newcomb Faculty Lounge, Room 114
“Intelectualidad y nomadismo en José Luis González” Prof. Guillermo Irizarry, a Latino Studies specialist in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University, is the author of numerous publications on Latino/Latina Literature in the United States, Latin American Theatre, and the themes of identity and translation in Caribbean literature including his upcoming book entitled El intelectual nómada: José Luis González y su emplazamiento del nacionalismo puertorriqueño. In this lecture, he will conduct an interrogation of the Puerto Rican intellectual’s production, in its various territorial and ideological displacements. He will also discuss how González’s mobility and exile serve as vehicles to problematize cultural nationalism and identity, and to rethink normative paradigms of authorial and interlocutionary positionality. Lecture will be in Spanish. Light refreshments to follow. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Debbie Ramil at 504.862.8629 or dramil@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

Guatemalan Human Rights Lecture
Monday, October 27, 2003, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Newcomb Hall, Room 123
María Domingo, a Maya Mam originally from the department of Huehuetenango, went into refuge in Mexico at age 10. Upon returning to Guatemala, her family settled in Copal AA, Alta Verapaz. She has actively participated in the organizing efforts of Mama Maquin from the age of 18 and is currently the regional coordinator of Mama Maquin in Alta Verapaz, participates in negotiations for women’s access to co- ownership of land, imparts informational workshops on the topics of free trade, Plan Puebla Panama (PPP), and genetically modified crops in rural communities and is the organizational representative to the Mesa Global. She has participated in international gatherings in Thailand, Mexico, and Cuba on the topics of experiences of refugee women, the participation of indigenous women, and free trade issues. She will also be speaking in Spanish (no translation) Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Maureen Shea at 504.865.5518 or mshea@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

“Collaborative Research in Developing Countries: NIH-Costa Rican Exprience with Human Papilloma Virus”
Monday, October 13, 2003, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Xavier University, Norman C. Francis Building, Room 130
Jose Bonilla will also attending the annual
International E.Hormone 2003 Conference sponsored by the CBR to be held
October 16-19, 2003 Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the
public. For more information, call Roldan Valverde at 504.520.7659. The
event is sponsored by: CBR at Tulane and Xavier, University of Costa Rica,
CR-US Foundation.

“The Beginning and Ending of Writing”
Thursday, October 02, 2003, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Woldenberg Art Center, Stone Auditorium (Room 210)
Steve Houston is anthropologist at Brigham Young University and a distinguished Mayanist and specialist in writing systems. His talk will look broadly and theoretically at the circumstances that create and extinguish writing systems, using Maya hieroglyphics as a case study. Reception to follow. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Elizabeth Boone at 504.865.5327 or eboone@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Art Department.

“Historical Features of Brazilian Popular Music and the Work of Fred Goes as Composer”
Thursday, October 2, 3:30 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Rockefeller Fellow and Brazilian Popular Music composer Fred Goes will speak about his music and show through his compositions the different singularities of Brazilian Popular Music (MPB). Fred Goes is a 2003-2004 Rockefeller Fellow at Tulane University focusing on his research project – The New Orleans Mardi Gras and Rio de Janeiro Carnival: Similarities and Differences in the Kingdoms of Rex and Momo. Prof. Goes is on leave from the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro where he is a professor in the postgraduate program in the Science of Literature in the Faculdade de Letras. He is also an accomplished songwriter of Brazilian Popular Music (MPB).

Nicaragua Medical Outreach Program Presentation
Wednesday, October 1, 2003, 5:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
As part of this program, 15 medical students from Tulane travel each spring
to a small rural town in Nicaragua and set up clinics offering free medical
care and public health education. For the last two years, the Stone Center
for Latin American Studies at Tulane has provided some support for the
Nicaragua Medical Outreach Program here at Tulane. In return for Stone
Center support, some of the medical students participating in this program
have offered to present the work of the Nicaragua Medical Outreach Program
and will be doing so this Wednesday.

“Globalization, Human Capital, and the Disappearance of Minority Cultures: An Economic Analysis with Applications to the Maya of Guatemala”
Friday, September 19, 2003, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Tilton Hall, Room 301
This lecture by John Edwards is free and open to the public. Papers will be available in Tilton Hall, Room 206. For more information, call John Edwards at 504.865.5321. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Murphy Institute of Political Economy.

Juan Antonio Garcia Borrero Lecture
Wednesday, September 17, 2003, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
102 Jones Hall
CUBAN CINEMA: HISTORY, HISTORIOGRAPHY, AND POSTMODERNITY”. Lecture by Juan Antonio Garcia Borrero The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute invites you to attend this lecture by Juan Antonio Garcia Borrero, prize-winning Cuban film critic and journalist. Borrero will discuss the historiographic assumptions of how Cuban film history has been written. How has the idea of a “Cuban Cinema” been constructed? Is “Cuban Cinema” synonymous with the cinema produced by the Cuban Film Institute? In particular, he will explore the impact of other forms of audio-visual production, which he calls, “Submerged Cinemas,” on the reconstruction of what we mean when we say “Cuban Cinema.” Reception to follow. This event is free and open to the public. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Debbie Ramil at 504.862.8629 or dramil@tulane.edu respectively. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by: Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

“Massacre at Punta Lobos, Peru”
Friday, September 12, 2003, 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Dinwiddie Hall 4th Floor
The Tulane Anthropology Student Association invites you to join us for the
first colloquium of the semester. Dr. John Verano will present, “Massacre at Punta Lobos, Peru.” Refreshments will be served before presentation. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, contact Department of Anthropology. The event is being hosted by: Latin
American Studies, and is sponsored by: Department of Anthropology.

“Music and the Peruvian National Imagination in 20th Century Lima.
Part II: Music from the late 1950s on, beginning with the Afroperuvian revival and concluding with more recent popular musics, including rock and teknocumbia.”
Thursday, September 11, 2003, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Dixon Recital Hall, Annex 152
Lecture and presentation of audio and visual materials, by Javier León. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Ray Taras at 504-862-8302. The event is sponsored by Tulane College’s Duren Professorship Program.

“Music and the Peruvian National Imagination in 20th Century Lima.
Part I: Indigenous and criollo music.”
Tuesday, September 9, 2003, 9:30 – 10:45 AM
Dixon Recital Hall, Annex 152
Lecture and presentation of audio and visual materials, by Javier León. . This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Ray Taras at 504-862-8302. The event is sponsored by Tulane College’s Duren Professorship Program.

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Upcoming Events

Talk with Noah Bullock: What is a Human Rights Approach?

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Noah Bullock, the Executive Director at Cristosal, will be giving a talk entitled: What is a Human Rights Approach? This talk is part of Tulane University’s celebration of International Education Week which highlights the benefits of international exchange on campus. IEW at Tulane runs from October 16th- October 20th. More information about the Tulane IEW and the events on campus can be found here.

Olancho Screening-New Orleans Film Festival

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following screenings for the New Orleans Film Festival, which will run from October 11th-19th. Screenings are held at various locations in New Orleans. The box office is located at the Ace Hotel (600 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, LA 70130).

OLANCHO

28th Annual New Orleans Film Festival to Feature Latinx Programming

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The 28th Annual New Orleans Film Festival will be held from October 11th to October 19th at participating theaters in the New Orleans area. Born in a city known for its eclectic and artistic vibrancy, the New Orleans Film Festival (NOFF) has sought out bold and passionate storytellers since 1989. It is the longest-running festival of its kind in the state of Louisiana and one of the largest film festivals in the South. Now in its 28th year, the New Orleans Film Festival has grown into an internationally respected annual event that attracts 20-25k people, 400+ filmmakers, and 240 films.

This year’s film festival will feature a number of films relating to the Latin American community, either in subject matter and/or made by Latin American filmmakers. The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute will be sponsoring several films, including Olancho and Cuban Short Stories.

A full list of film selections and synopses may be found here.

For more information on tickets, passes, and film packages, visit the NOFF website.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following films:

Olancho
Manuel, a farmer from Olancho, Honduras, seeks fame by making music for the region’s drug cartels. When some of his song lyrics get him in trouble, he must make the most difficult decision of his life: continue the quest for fame, or flee. For information on times and locations, visit the Olancho event page.

Cuban Shorts: Cine Cubano
These Cuban short stories are a series of short films highlight cultural and social subject manner relating to the Cuban community. For more information on show times and locations, visit the event page.

Fighting Cuba’s Boxing Ban
A short documentary about female boxing in Cuba, where the Cuban government forbade women from competing in the 2016 summer olympics.

Manuel
A short documentary about an 87-year-old Cuban man who brews and sells potions said to be aphrodisiacs.

Parade
Jazz students from New Orleans travel to Cuba on a cultural exchange and collaborate on a parade, celebrating open borders.

Connection (Conectifai)
A portrait of a park in Havana where, thanks to public Wi-Fi, a new kind of meeting place has arisen.

Charlie
Four decades after hijacking a plane to Cuba to avoid charges of killing a state trooper, a former black power militant reflects on his past in a letter to his nine-year-old Cuban son.

Forever, Comandante (Hasta Siempre, Comandante)
Living in the shadow of the revolutionary generation’s unrelenting Cuban ideals, Ernesto, a 14-year-old barber, wants to get a tattoo despite his father’s adamant objection.

Prince of Smoke
Cuban tobacco farmer and artisanal cigar maker Hirochi Robaina follows in his legendary grandfather’s footsteps as he fights to preserve a 171-year-old family legacy.

Additional titles relating to the Latin American community include:

The Thunder Feast (Truenos de San Juan)
A documentary about the ancient festival of San Juanito in Guanajuato where homemade explosives are part of the revelry, but not everyone in the community is sure this tradition should continue.

Sambá
A documentary about Cisco, a Dominican-born man who returns to the Dominican Republic after doing time in a United State prison. Cisco soon finds that the only way he can make money is getting involved in loosely organized street fighting.

Days of Wholesome Joy
A Cuban narrative short about a woman taking care of her grandmother who has dementia.

Holy Hill
A narrative short story about a nun who works at a school for young boys in the Dominican Republic. Both she and the boys have parallel sexual awakenings.

Camp of the Innocents
A Louisiana-made short documentary about the U.S. interment of Latin American “enemy aliens” during World War II in New Orleans. The entire synopsis, as well as show times and location may be found here.

Dead Horses
A Catalan animated short film about a child fleeing his home during wartime.

Bells in the Mountains
A Spanish short documentary about a group of cows who migrate seasonally from the town of Ullé through the foothills of the Spanish Pyrenees Mountains.

Elegy
A short narrative film about a girl who cannot process her complicated feelings about the death of her two classmates.

Cuban Shorts: Cine Cubano-New Orleans Film Festival

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following screenings for the New Orleans Film Festival, which will run from October 11th-19th. Screenings are held at various locations in New Orleans. The box office is located at the Ace Hotel (600 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, LA 70130).

CUBAN SHORTS: CINE CUBANO

  • Saturday, October 14th 1:00PM | Member $10 General $13
  • Thursday, October 19th 11:30AM | Members $7 General $10

Tulane to host MET Curator Dr. Joanne Pillsbury for talk on Luxury Arts in the Ancient Americas

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Dr. Joanne Pillsbury, the Andrall E. Pearson Curator of the Art of the Ancient Americas at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will give a presentation titled From the Heart of the Andes: On Creating Golden Kingdoms, as part of the 2017 Wladis Seminar on Curatorial Careers at the Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Dr. Pillsbury will give a behind-the-scenes view of the exhibition Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas (Getty Research Institute and Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fall 2017-Spring 2018), and the international research project that inspired it. Drawing upon significant recent archaeological findings and new investigations into the roles of artists, their patrons, and their workshops, the lecture focuses on luxury arts in the lands between the two great imperial capitals of the ancient Americas: Cusco, the seat of the Inca state, and Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital. It probes a fundamental question: How can we discern and interpret indigenous ideas of value?

Dr. Pillsbury is a specialist in the art and archaeology of the Precolumbian Americas. Pillsbury earned her PhD from Columbia University. She was previously associate director of the Getty Research Institute and director of Precolumbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks. She is the author, editor, or co-editor of numerous publications, including the three-volume Guide to Documentary Sources for Andean Studies, 1530–1900 (2008), the Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Award recipient Ancient Maya Art at Dumbarton Oaks (2012), and Past Presented: Archaeological Illustration and the Ancient Americas (2012), which was awarded the Association for Latin American Art Book Award.

The lecture is sponsored by the Newcomb Art Department, supported by a gift from Mark and Diane Wladis.

For more information contact Dr. Elizabeth Boone via email to eboone@tulane.edu.

For more information, view the official flyer here.

Tulane to host Dr. Andrew Paxman for a talk on William Jenkins and the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming historian and biographer Dr. Andrew Paxman, who will present his research and recent book in a talk titled William Jenkins: Profiteer of the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema on October 19th.

In his talk, Dr. Paxman will focus on the life and film industry activities of William Jenkins, an American from humble beginnings who became the richest man in Mexico. Using biographical information and excerpts from his recent book Jenkins of Mexico: How a Southern Farm Boy Became a Mexican Magnate, Dr. Paxman will highlight how the American entrepreneur built up the Mexican film industry.

Currently, Dr. Paxman is a research professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE) in Mexico, where he teaches history and journalism. Earlier in his career, Dr. Paxman was a journalist in Mexico and co-authored El Tigre: Emilio Azcárraga y su imperio Televisa (2000). He earned a Masters in Latin American Studies from University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD in History from the University of Texas, Austin.