Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

2004-2005 Events Archive I

August 1st, 2004 - August 1st, 2005

Symposia & Conferences

The Gulf Coast Consortium of Latin American Colonialists Second Annual Conference
Tulane University
Friday, February 18-19, 2005

The Gulf Coast Consortium of Latin American Colonialists invites paper proposals from faculty, graduate students and independent scholars on topics related to the conference’s theme. Proposals should be no more than 200 words in length and are due no later than October 15th, 2004. Papers will be due by January 14, 2005. Attendance by all interested scholars is heartily encouraged. Admission charged. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Susan Schroeder at 504.862.8616 or sschroe@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by the Department of History.

Between Race and Place: Blacks and Blackness in Central America and the Mainland Caribbean
Tulane University
Friday, November 12-13, 2004

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary and international group of scholars to challenge traditional notions of race and identity in Central America, Mexico and Colombia in both the colonial and postcolonial contexsts. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, inquire at raceconf@tulane.edu or see the conference website at http://www.tulane.edu/~jwolfe/rp. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies and is sponsored by Latin American Studies and Mount Holyoke College.

Third Annual Maya Symposium and Workshop: Fifteen Centuries of Maya Literature from the Northern Lowlands
Tulane University
October 29 – October 31, 2004

The Yucatán Peninsula is unique in the Maya world in having a continuous literary tradition dating from the prehispanic to the contemporary period. We invite you to join us for an exploration of hieroglyphic, Colonial, and contemporary texts written by the Yucatec Maya. This year’s program features a series of lectures, discussions, and workshops led by specialists in the fields of epigraphy, linguistics, anthropology, and Colonial history. For more information, contact Brian Knighten or visit http://stonecenter.tulane.edu/MayaSymposium/

Improving the Climate, Increasing Opportunities, Eliminating Corruption
Tulane Latin American Law Institute
Hyatt Regency Hotel, New Orleans
Wednesday, December 1-3, 2004

The Tulane Latin American Law Institute was established in New Orleans, Louisiana, unique jurisdiction in the U.S.A. that combines an important tradition of continental civil law and common law, as a forum to debate business and legal matters, crucial to the relations between U.S.A. and Latin America. The Institute aims to identify common political, social and economical ground and to foster relationships between those who participate in the Institute in order to improve the legal and business climate of the hemisphere. This being the SECOND LATIN AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE, at only two months from the presidential elections in the U.S.A. the pertinent topics include: -Energy Law -Trade & Investment -Regional Security, Terrorism & Risk Management -Environmentally Sustainable Development -Law Reform We highly recommend attendance by: Attorneys, Businessmen, Public Officials and all those that are involved in international activities in the Americas. Admission charged. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail A. Jenkins at 504.865.5900 or ajenkins@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by theTulane Law School.

Seminar & Film Series

Latin American Studies Fim Series “¡Money, Dinero, Dinheiro!”
102 Jones Hall
Most Thursday nights, 7:00 PM, Spring 2005

This semester the LAS Film Series will explore the concept of money. Join us we examine the impact of money on country, peoples and environments. All facets of the spectrum are represented here.

Latin American Environmental Media Festival
Tulane University
April 15-17, 2005

The Stone Center of Latin American Studies at Tulane University announces the inauguration of a project that will establish a new Latin American Environmental Media Festival in New Orleans to open in April 2005. This three-day event will bring to audiences films, videos, and innovative works in digital media whose subjects bring critical attention to major environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. This new festival, which will be held on the Tulane University campus and at venues in the city, will screen a curated, non-competitive series of innovative works and a new productions submitted as part of a juried competition. A distinguished jury will award prizes in four categories at the opening of the festival in April. This new initiative is being developed with assistance from the New Orleans Film Festival.

Filmmaking as Activism: A Panel Discussion on Environmental Filmmaking in Latin America
Friday, April 15, 1-3:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall

The guest jury of the Stone Center’s Latin American Environmental Media Festival will present a panel discussion on filmmaking as social activism, focusing on Latin America and environment. The panelist will discuss: access to media making tools in the U.S and Latin America; the current state of environmental filmmaking; competing worldviews of progress in developing countries; sources of funding for filmmakers; and film as a tool for social change. This event is free and open to the public.

The panelist will include:

  • Greg Berger, Filmmaker from NYC/Mexico, The Machette Rebellion, Gringo-thon
  • Barbara Bramble, Director of International Programs, National Wildlife Federation
  • Adrian Cowell, Filmmaker for WWF and BBC with over 30 years of experience working in the Amazon, Fires of the Amazon, Banking on Disaster, The Development Road
  • DeeDee Halleck, Filmmaker, activist, educator, founding member of the Indy Media Center network and Deepdish TV
  • Roselly A. Torres Rojas, Director of the Latin American Video Archives (LAVA)

Casa Argentina Film Series: Roma
Room 102, Jones Hall
Friday, April 1, 2005, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Writer Joaquín Góñez (José Sacristán) is suffering from writer’s block. He has lost the drive; he now thinks that writing fiction isn’t worthwhile and he is quickly running out of money. He has asked for an advance on his autobiography. The publisher hires Manuel Cueto (Diego Botto), a journalism student who works as copyeditor, to transcribe the work. This meeting with the young journalist awakens forgotten emotions in Joaquín who is transported back to the 50s and 60s and the years of his youth and adolescence: a complacent middle class life in ’53 with a certain future, English school pedigree, car, his own home; but it all ended abruptly with the death of his father. From that moment his mother chooses between destitution or a fight for the survival of her son. Joaquín owes his spirit sense of self to his mother and the ideals they dreamt of togther. These memories inspire in Joaquín a desire to recover what he had thought lost. Directed by Adolfo Aristaráin. In Spanish with English subititles. Open to the public. Refreshments served.

All on a Mardi Gras Day
Norman Mayer Building, Rm 119
Thursday, February 3, 2005, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

This is a wonderful video made by WYES, New Orleans Public Television Network, and funded by the LA Endowment for the Humanities. Employing archival materials and interviews with local artists, musicians, and community members, this video details the diversity of Mardi Gras traditions associated with New Orleans’ Black Communities. The video includes footage detailing the Mardi Gras Indian tradition, the Skull and Bones costuming tradition in the Treme, the Baby Dolls and Dirty Dozen costuming tradition, the history of Zulu, and cultural traditions as expressed through Mardi Gras music. We’ll eat some King Cake and get ourselves in the mood for Mardi Gras fun. Hope to see all of you there. For more information, contact Donna Bonner at x3510.

Cruel Courage
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, December 2, 2004, 5:00 PM

This film, by Stone Center Ph.D. Candidate Gray Miles, examines modern life in Colombia. It begins in NYC on September 11th, 2001. After witnessing the destruction of ground zero, the filmmaker searches for answers. A week later he finds himself in Colombia, a country which has been living with terrorism almost half a century. We’re introduced to our characters: a social worker assisting campesino families displaced by the war, a choreographer teaching barrio children to escape violence through dance and trying to keep his ideals in a climate of compromise, an assassin-for-hire struggling to understand himself and his context, and a maverick photographer intent on documenting Colombia’s terrorism. We learn what our characters can teach the world about living in and through terrorism. The thread of the filmmaker’s journey continues – a personal quest to understand how Colombians live in a world shot through with terrorism. As the film progresses it becomes clear there are two basic responses, two decisions: become part of the terror, or work to end it. Although in Colombia the cycle of violence ultimately continues, this film is a story of hope and resilience because of the choices made by the main characters. But hope itself is cruel. As Gabriel García Márquez has written, the adaptability of Colombians may be the cruellest kind of courage, because it enables Colombians to carry on no matter how terrible the circumstances. For more information, contact Gray Miles at

Casa Argentina Film Series: Un abrazo partido (A Broken Embrace)
Room 102, Jones Hall
Friday, November 5, 2004, 7:30 PM

Directed by Daniel Burman (2004). In Spanish with English subtitles. 100 minutes. Refreshments served. Open to the public. Ariel is a “late-bloomer” in contemporary Argentina, an environment of confusion and decadence, where everything around him is being transformed into something else in a desperate quest for survival. In this transformation, some turn to their origins, not as an affirmation of identity, but rather with a “bureaucratic” purpose, such as acquiring a passport from an ancestor’s homeland that turns a European paradise into a construct of hope and what might be. But one event happens in this young man’s life that helps him to make up his mind: a father becomes a hero by abandoning his family in search of an ideal. This ignites a moral dilemma and becomes a blinding obsession. Until reality transforms itself, too, like everything else that surrounds Ariel: the father returns with new truths, a new history that now is also Ariel’s. “A Broken Embrace” attempts to show the path for forming an identity built upon anecdotes that are comic and tragic, true and make-believe.

Coming Home from the Field: Martha Huggins Thesis Seminar
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, October 22, 2004, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

“Coming Home from the Field” Student presentations on research methods from Summer 2004. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Naomi Weiss-Laxer at 504.400.8741

The Crime of Padre Amaro
Sharp Dorm Lounge
Wednesday, October 20, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Gael Garcia Bernal plays Father Amaro, a new priest assigned to the small rural town of Los Reyes, Mexico. Upon arrival, he discovers that a conspiracy of corruption, sex and lies has overtaken the local Catholic Church. As he tries to separate himself from the other priests’ actions, he finds the temptation too great and is eventually drawn in. The Crime of Father Amaro created much controversy upon its release and many Catholic organizations in Mexico and the United States called for a boycott of the film. It eventually went on to become the highest-grossing Mexican film in its native country. Directed by Carlos Carrera, Mexico, 2002. Spanish with English subtitles, 120 min. For more information, contact Eric Boggs via eboggs@tulane.edu.

Nicotina
Canal Place
Wednesday, October 13, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

This is part of New Orleans Film Festival. Director Hugo Rodríguez’s stylish caper comedy stars Diego Luna (Y Tu Mamá También) and takes place in Mexico City in real time, between 9:17pm and 10:50pm. From the first minute, we are on a wild ride where ordinary people and criminals alike are swept into a sea of circumstances during the pursuit of twenty missing diamonds. When the haze finally clears, computers have been hacked, people have been whacked and lives have gone up in a cloud of smoke. Winner of 6 Ariel Awards (Mexico’s Oscars), including acting honors for co-stars Rosa María Bianchi, Rafael Inclán and Daniel Giménez Cacho. (Fully subtitled)

Casa Argentina Film: Valentín
102 Jones Hall
Friday, October 8, 2004, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Casa Argentina cordially invites to see the Argentine movie Valentín. Valentín, is a 9 years old (Rodrigo Noya) abandoned by his father, an immature playboy, and by his mother who is mysteriously absent. He lives with his grandmother in Buenos Aires. When his father starts dating the beautiful and easy going Leticia, Valentín takes the role of Cupid, with the hope that his father will marry again and he would have the mother he never had before. But his plans fail and make more trouble in everybody’s lives until an unexpected change reveals the mysterious path of love. Director: Alejandro Agreste. Cast: Julieta Cardinali, Carmen Maura, Jean Pierre Noher, Mex Urtizberea, Carlos Roffé, Lorenzo Quinteros, Marina Glezer, Stéfano Di Gregorio, Fabián Vena. The film has subtitles and is rated G. This event is open to the public.

Legacies of Violence
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Saturday, October 2, 2004, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Legacies of Violence: Memory and Political Transition in Central America and the Southern Cone. This day- long workshop brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to examine the myriad legacies of violence in Latin America and their effects on the process of political translation. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Anthony Pereira at 504.862.8312 or apereir@tulane.edu respectively.

Aguirre the Wrath of God
Sharp Dorm Lobby
Wednesday, September 29, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

In Aguirre the Wrath of God, the astonishing Klaus Kinski plays Don Lope de Aguirre, a brutal conquistador who leads his soldiers into the Amazon jungle in an obsessive quest for gold. The story is of the expedition’s relentless degeneration into brutality and despair, but the movie is much more than its plot. Director Werner Herzog strove, whenever possible, to replicate the historical circumstances of the conquistadors, and the sheer human effort of traveling through the dense mountains and valleys of Brazil in armor creates a palpable sense of struggle and derangement. This sense of reality, combined with Kinski’s intensely furious performance, makes Aguirre, the Wrath of God a riveting film. Directed by Werner Herzog, Germany/Peru, 1977. Language: German with English subtitles. Come and watch a movie from the comfort of a couch. BYOJF – bring your own junk food. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, e-mail Eric Boggs at eboggs@tulane.edu. This movie is being presented as part of Latin American Studies Movie Night.

Legacies of Violence Series: Movie – Pictures From a Revolution
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Wednesday, September 29, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Award-winning photogournalist Susan Meiselas covered the Sandinista overthrow of Nicaragua’s Somoza dictatorship in 1978 and 1979 for the New York Times. Ten years later she returned to Nicaragua to find the subjects of her photographs and try to understand the aftermath of the Sandinista Revolution and the Contra War. This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the 1979 Sandinista victory, a moment of joy and hope in Nicaragua. In 1990, amid dashed hopes and counterrecolutionary war, the Sandinistas were defeated in free and fair elections. While democracy has survived since then, Nicaraguans have continued to struggle with the legacies of violence and poverty. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Justin Wolfe at 504.865.8630 or jwolfe@tulane.edu respectively.

Diablos Rojos: Los Buses de Panama
Middle American Research Institute (M.A.R.I.), 4th Floor Dinwiddie Hall
Friday, September 24, 2004, 4:00 PM

Diablos Rojos: Los Buses de Panama (Red Devils: The Buses of Panama) is an ehtnographic documentary film. Presented by Nina Mueller-Schwarze. Refreshments at 3:30. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by TASA & GSSA.

Seminar on Historical Change and Social Theory
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Every other Monday night, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM, Fall 2004

Starting September 27th, this series consists of pre-circulated papers, please contact Anthony Pereira at 865.5166. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Justin Wolfe at 504.865.8630 or jwolfe@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by the Department of History and Department of Political Science.

Latin American Film Series “Cities of Latin America”
102 Jones Hall
Most Thursday nights, 7:00 PM, Fall 2004

This series is an exploration of Latin America through an urban lens. The City represents a unique space in Latin America, and filmmakers have long recognized the importance of urban centers as a reflection of Latin American society as a whole. This film series will feature many salient films of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. With a focus on a wide range of social groups, these films are all unified by their setting within urban centers. In many ways the city itself is the star of these films.

  • September 9: Madame Sata (Brazil, 2002)
  • September 16: Por la libre (Mexico, 2000)
  • September 23: Senorita Extraviada (U.S., 2001)
  • September 30: Great Day in Havana (U.S., 2000)
  • October 14: Moebius (Argentina, 1996)
  • October 21: Bus 174 (Brazil, 2004) *Special Event
  • November 4: La Ciudad (U.S., 1999)
  • November 18: City of God (Brazil, 2003)

*Please note, Bus 174 will be screened in Richardson 117 at 6:00 PM. A panel discussion will follow the film.

Student Events

CIS Summer Program Leader Training
Newcomb Hall, Room 114
Wednesday, April 20, 2005, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Organized by the Center for International Studies, the purpose of this meeting is to provide information on safety,insurance, immunization and healthcare for summer program directors and their students while abroad. Jeff Gieseler, Director of the Office of Risk Management, and Deanie Stoulig from the Student Health Center Travel Clinic will offer their expert advice.

Reception for Senior Spanish Majors
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tuesday, April 19, 2005, 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM
By invitation only. For more information, contact Jean Dangler at x5518.

LAST Honors Thesis Roundtable
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, April 14, 2005, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
We have 5 thesis writers this year who will present their research in an informal roundtable discussion over lunch. A po-boy lunch will be provided by the Honors Program. Our honors students are:

  • Anne Ferris (Javier Leon): Tango, Music of the Nation: The Mainstreaming of Tango and the Political Inclusion of the Masses in Argentina from 1880-1955
  • Meg Greeley (w/ENVB – Jeff Chambers): Reforestation and Carbon Sequestration in Southern Brazil
  • Mariana Sarmiento (w/ENST – Eric Dannenmaier): Transgenic Maize in Mexico (winner of the Newcomb Fellowship for next year)
  • Becky Stevenson (Marilyn Miller): Marketing Macondo: The US Literary Market for Post Boom Latin American Literature
  • Eliza Wethey (w/ANTH – Judy Maxwell): Impact of Tourism on Textile Production in Chinchero, Peru

ADST Open House
Stern Gallery
Thursday, April 7, 2005, 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM

The purpose of this event is to let Tulane undergraduate students know about the ADST major and minor and create a stronger identity for ADST on campus. The event will feature a drumming group (Mambephe Percussion featuring Martin Urbach), as well as jerk chicken, fried patties, and other goodies from Boswell’s Jamaican Grill. Information about the major and the minor will be available to students, as well as information regarding upcoming ADST courses and ADST-related programs. ADST-affiliated faculty and current majors and minors will be available to chat with students. For more information, contact Donna Bonner at dbonner@tulane.edu.

LAGO Meeting
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, March 11, 2005, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Latin Americanist Graduate Organization’s monthly meeting. Open to all Tulane Latin American Studies Graduate students. For more information, contact Beth Seymour at (617) 899-2754.

Summer in Mexico and Summer in the Dominican Republic Info Session
Sharp Hall
Wednesday, March 9, 2005, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

The Program Directors will present video footage or slide shows featuring some of the cultural and natural highlights of their program locations and will be there to discuss the general structure, academic content, and student life issues corresponding to the programs themselves. Interested students will have the chance to ask questions about the programs and view stunning images of the program locations and past student groups who have participated. Plus, there’s free food! FREE LATIN AMERICAN FOOD WILL BE SERVED. The application deadline for these two programs and other summer abroad programs operated by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies will be April 1, 2005. So this will be a perfect time to get the full scoop on these opportunities! For more information and applications (including scholarship info) for the Stone Center’s summer programs in Latin America and the Caribbean, please visit our summer programs’ webpage at: http://stonecenter.tulane.edu/html/International.htm#Summer.
Keep in mind that you may also encourage your friends from home to participate in our summer programs since we welcome the participation of non-Tulane students. You may also obtain general information on the programs and this specific event by contacting dramil@tulane.edu or phoning the SCLAS Summer Program Coordination Office in the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute office in Caroline Richardson Hall at 862-8629.

FLAS Technical Assistance Workshop
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, February 21, 2005, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

This workshop is to assist those students intending to apply for a FLAS for the summer study of a less-commonly-taught language in the Latin American and Caribbean region. At these workshops, we will be going over the guidelines and answering any specific technical questions about the application process and the grants themselves.

Graduate Student Summer Research Techanical Assistance Workshop
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, February 7, 2005, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

This workshop is to assist graduate students with applying for their summer field research grants abroad on the study of the Latin American and Caribbean region. At these workshops, we will be going over the guidelines and answering any specific technical questions about the application process and the grants themselves.

Access to Care: Health Care Barriers for Latinos in the New Orleans Community and the Underserved in Latin America
First United Methodist Church, 3401 Canal Street (at Jefferson Davis Parkway)
Saturday, January 29, 2005, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

This day-long workshop, designed by and for Tulane students in Latin American studies seeks to comparatively explore problems of health and poverty that cut across geographic and “first-world”/“third world” boundaries. Examining the Latino community in New Orleans can be instructive because of this community’s experience with immigration. The first objective of this workshop is to see how practical work within the New Orleans’ Latino community can foster new questions within academia. The second objective is to promote networking between and among the Latino service organizations and the Tulane community to facilitate collaboration and to inspire ideas for practical partnerships involving Tulane and local service agencies and the Latino community, such as internships, volunteer opportunities, and research. We invite local practitioners and community members, as well as local university professors, researchers, and students to get to know each other and to spark future collaboration on local health and development. Workshop questions:

  • How does the important issue of access-to-care impact other issues such as HIV/AIDS, infectious disease and nutrition?
  • How are health care outcomes and services similar (or at variance with) those outcomes and services in Latin America and New Orleans?
  • What are the explanations for these similarities, despite the developed/developing distinction?
  • What type of trend-sharing and brainstorming can happen between those who study/work on Latin America and those who study/work on Latinos in New Orleans?

Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. Parking is behind the chruch, entrance on N. Clark Street. For more information, e-mail Nomi Weiss-Laxer at nweissla@tulane.edu. The event is being sponsored by LAGO, with support from the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, the Graduate School Student Association and the Graduate and Professional Students Association.

Roundtable on Careers in the CIA
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, January 27, 2005, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

A former MA in Latin American Studies from Tulane who is a diversity recruitment coordinator with the CIA will be available to discuss with our Grad and Undergrad Students potential careers in the CIA.

Seminar in Historical Change and Social Theory
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, January 24, 2005, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

This is a biweekly seminar occurring every other Monday, starting in January. In this, faculty and students present work in progress and receive comments and criticism from seminar participants. Event is not open to the public. For information, contact Anthony Periera x8312.

LAGO Professionalization Series: Publishing for Grad Students
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, November 4, 2004, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Donna Lee Van Cott will be conducting a workshop for graduate students on how to prepare publications. Admission is free of charge.

LAGO Professionalization Series: CV and Statement of Purpose Writing Workshop Follow-up
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tuesday, October 26, 2004, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Dr. Jimmy Huck, Assistant Director and Graduate Advisor for the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, will be conducting a follow-up for the CV/Statement of Purpose workshop. This meeting is to share the CVs and Statements of Purpose that were written fromthe first session. Admission is free of charge. Refreshments will be served before the workshop begins.

LAGO Professionalization Series: CV and Statement of Purpose Writing Workshop
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tuesday, October 5, 2004, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Dr. Jimmy Huck, Assistant Director and Graduate Advisor for the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, will be conducting a workshop on how to write CVs (curriculum vitae) and Statements of Purpose for applications to Ph.D. programs. Admission is free of charge. Refreshments will be served before the workshop begins.

Grant Writing Workshop
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, September 3, 2004, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Dr. Justin Wolfe will give an informal talk to graduate students about applying for grants. Admission is free of charge. This event is open only to members of the Tulane Community. For more information, call or e-mail Kate Schuenke at 504.256.0537 or kateschuenke@yahoo.com respectively. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies and is sponsored by LAGO.

New Graduate Student Orientation
August 23-24, 2004
Please see schedule for more information or contact the Stone Center.

Lectures

Transgenic Maize in Mexico
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Wednesday, May 4, 2005, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
This lecture is an Honor’s Thesis Presentation by Mariana Sarmiento .

Fostering Democracy in Trouble Spots and America’s Role
Loyola University, Miller Hall Room 208
Thursday, April 28, 2005, 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
This lecture will be given by Gene Bigler, the Office Director for Strategic and External Affairs (DRL/SEA) Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. Pizza will be provided.

Latino Culture and Politics into the 21st Century: Latino Mental Health
Earl K Long Library
Tuesday, April 19, 2005, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Presented by Enrique Varela, Professor of Psychology, Tulane University and Lauren Dito, Doctoral student in Psychology, Tulane University.

A mathematical model of the screwworm eradication program barrier zone in Panama
Alcee Fortier, Rm 301
Friday, April 15, 2005, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Part of the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Seminar Series. This lecture will be given by Dr. Robert Matlock, Tulane University. Refreshments will be served prior to the talks. For more information, contact Shea Heath x 5191.

Modernizing Haitian Dance: Jean Léon Destiné, Lavinia Williams and the Golden Age of Haitian Tourism
Norman Mayer, Room 101
Friday, April 1, 2005, 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
ADST Spring 2005 Lecture Series presents Millery Polyné (City University of New York). Followed by a reading from Polyné‘s book, “Release: Race Love Jazz”

Destrucción y Cultura en el Chile Post-golpe
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, April 1, 2005, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Dr. Federico Galende is a professor of art and sociology in the University of Chile and ARCIS University. He is the author of “La oreja de los nombres:
lugares de la melancolía en el pensamiento contemporáneo” and dozens of articles on critical theory and Latin American literature. Dr. Galende is the director of the cultural magazine Extremoccidente and a member of the advisory boards for Revista de Crítica Cultural (Chile) and Confines (Argentina). He was also a frequent contributor to legendary Argentine literary magazines such as Babel and is now a visiting professor at Duke University. Note: the conference will be held in Spanish.

Don’t Be A Fool in the Field: Focus on Fieldwork
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, April 1, 2005, 12:30 PM – 3:00 PM
A panel discussion on fieldwork methods in ethnographies and interviews. Sponsored by LAGO. For more information, contact Alexzia Plummer at 261-1998.

Drum Talk and Oricha Worship: Toward a Theology of Sound
Dixon Annex Recital Hall
Thursday, March 17, 2005, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

This talk is the second Gilbert Chase Memorial Lecture on Latin American Music. Presented by Katherine Hagedorn, Pomona College, Los Angeles. The talk will discuss the way in which Afro-Cuban rhythmic patterns used by batá drummers during santería ceremonies can be understood as sonic portraits of the different orichas (saints/deities). The talk will also feature video and audio examples as well as live demonstrations of batá drumming by Michael Skinkus and members of the local santería group Moyuba. Reception to follow.

Carnival: Reading by Robert Antoni
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, March 14, 2005, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Acclaimed author, Robert Antoni, will be reading from his latest novel, Carnival, which explores themes of race and sexuality in a parodic re-casting of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises transported to the West Indies. Antoni’s previous novels, Divina Trace and Blessed the Fruit, in addition to his collection My Grandmother’s Erotic Folktales, have established him as one of the most innovative and vital voices to emerge from the Caribbean and the Americas. The author was an Associate Professor of creative writing and Caribbean literature at the University of Miami, where he taught for nine years. Most recently he taught fiction writing at Columbia University in fall 2004. The author will read from his new novel, Carnival (2005), released by Grove/Atlantic this past February. This book will be available for sale at the event. He will also read an excerpt from his first novel, Divina Trace (1991) for which he received the prestigious Commonwealth Writers Prize. Reception will follow. This event is free and open to the public. Sponsored also by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute. For further info, please contact 862-8629 or dramil@tulane.edu

Community Expressive Culture in the Global Soundscape: Folklore as Artistic Communication in Intimate and Mass-Mediated Settings
Newcomb Hall, Room 207
Friday, March 11, 2005, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

A presentation by Nick Spitzer, Professor of Folklore and Cultural Conservation, University of New Orleans; he is also Host and Producer, American Routes Public Radio International.Local content and performance-centered analysis in folklore studies—while useful in community ethnography and documentary work—has tended to avoid addressing the historical and cultural impacts of national and global society as carried to such communities by electronic and print media, education, and economic transformation. While one can argue that sustainable small-scale, landscape-based communities require continuity of cultural resources such as traditional language and beliefs, music and dance, ritual and festival, food and architecture, and other forms, such communities can also be seen in their expressive potential to influence mainstream vernacular cultures in national, global, and cyber settings. In turn various communities show great ability to transform received culture from larger market and communicative contexts for local use. Community examples will be drawn in part from Dr. Spitzer’s long-term fieldwork and project collaborations with Louisiana Afro-Creoles. Prospects for applying linguistic concepts of creolization to understand how broader cultural vernaculars are shaped by and affect local cultures will also be examined. The role of artistic communication—understood as “authentic” by various audiences—in both intimate and large scale settings will be considered. The prospects for new works directed at the scope and theory for vernacular culture will be addressed.

Latino Culture and Politics into the 21st Century: Roundtable on Latino Literature
Earl K Long Library
Tuesday, March 8, 2005, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Presented by Gabriel Gomez, Professor of Literature, University of New Orleans and Marilyn Miller, Professor of Literature, Tulane University.

Disorganized Progress: Automobiles and the Making of Modern Brazil
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tuesday, March 8, 2005, 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM

This lecture will be presented by Dr. Joel Wolfe, who is an Associate Professor of History and Master of the Will Rice College at Rice University. He is a specialist in Brazilian history with a focus on labor and technology. Professor Wolfe is the author of the book “Working Women, Working Men: São Paulo and the Rise of Brazil’s Industrial WorkingClass, 1900-1955” (Duke University Press) and editor of “Getúlio Vargas and His Legacy,” a special issue of the Luso-Brazilian Review. He is currently completing a book about automobiles and modernity in Brazilian history. For more information, contact Chris Dunn at x5519. Co-sponsored by the Brazilian Studies Council, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Landscape change and long-term variation in bird abundance in Amazonian rainforest fragments
Alcee Fortier, Rm 301
Friday, March 4, 2005, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Part of the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Seminar Series. This lecture will be given by Dr. Philip Stouffer, Louisiana State University. Refreshments will be served prior to the talks. For more information, contact Shea Heath x 5191.

TV news and political change in Brazil: The impact of democratization on TV Globo’s journalism
Newcomb, Rm 207
Monday, February 28, 2005, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
This lecture will be given by Communications Candidate Mauro Pereira Porto, Visiting Professor, Tulane University; Professor, Universidade de Brasilia.

Life in the Treetops – Adventures of a Woman in Field Biology
Freeman Auditorium, Woldenburg Art Center
Thursday, February 24, 2005, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tenth Marcia Monroe Conery Lecture. Our speaker will be Dr. Margaret D. Lowman, New College of Florida, Sarasota. A reception will follow in the Woodward Way. If you would like more information about the speaker and her topic, please contact Dr. Steven Darwin at 504-862-8286. Other questions can be directed to the office at 865-5191.

The Power of Chivalric Charm: Mexican Memory, American Guilt, and the Late Nineteenth Century Border Romance
Women’s Center Lounge, 2nd floor
Monday, February 21, 2005, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
This lecture will be presented by English job candidate Carrie Bramen, Professor, University at Buffalo (SUNY).

En el otro lado: U.S. retirees migrating to Mexico
Newcomb, Rm 207
Monday, February 21, 2005, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
This lecture will be given by Communication Candidate Vivian Rojas, Assistant Professor, UT-San Antonio.

Art and Politics in Contemporary Cuba
University of New Orleans, Earl K Long Library, Rm 407
Wednesday, February 16, 2005, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Tomás Montoya, Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, will discuss the complexity of Cuban culture and describe how contemporary artists define new spaces and trends in today s Cuba. Tomás Montoya is a Scholar, Educator, Arts Organizer and Poet, and a native and current resident of Santiago de Cuba. He is currently finishing his doctoral degree at Universidad de Oriente in Santiago de Cuba, within the multi-disciplinary program Society, Culture and Community. His research examines the conga street processions particular to Santiago de Cuba, looking at the role of popular celebrations and the use of public space. His analysis draws upon many other phenomenon within Cuban popular culture (like hip hop, timba, and son) and also compares the congas to other Circum-Caribbean street processions like second lines in New Orleans. In July 2002 Mr. Montoya helped organize the ReBirth Brass Band s performances with La Conga de los Hoyos during Carnival in Santiago de Cuba. He has also organized several trips for the CubaNola Collective to examine performance and culture in Cuba.

State building and military mobilization in the 19th century U.S. and Brazil
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, February 14, 2005, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

A presentation by Vitor Izecksohn, a political scientist from the Federal University of Rio De Janiero. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Anthony Pereira at x8312 or apereir@tulane.edu respectively. Sponsored by Brazilian Studies Council and Political Science Department.

Waiting for Rain: The Politics and Poetry of Drought in Northeast Brazil
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, February 3, 2005, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Nick Arons will discuss his new book, “Waiting for Rain: The Politics and Poetry of Drought in Northeast Brazil” (University of Arizona Press). Arons has worked as a writer for international policy think tanks, at the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, at public defender legal offices, for civil liberties organizations, and as a nonviolence educator. Arons carried out the research for his book on a Fulbright Fellowship and is currently a Robert McKay Scholar, a Hays Fellow and an Institute for International Law and Justice Fellow at New York University School of Law. For more information contact Edith Wolfe at ewolfe@tulane.edu.

Careers in the State Department
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Monday, January 31, 2005, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Ambassador Sullivan will be speaking informally about careers in the State Department to Latin American Studies Grad Students and Undergrad Students. The event, though, is open to the entire public.

Plant community composition affects soil processes
Alcee Fortier, Rm 301
Wednesday, January 25, 2005, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Dr. Ann Russell, Iowa State University, is an EEB candidate in Plant Ecology.

Sources and Methods of the New Philology
Latin American Library, Howard-Tilton Library 4th Floor
Friday, January 21, 2005, 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Dr. James Lockhart is Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, email Jon Truit at jtruit@tulane.edu. This event is sponsored by The Graduate Student Association and the Latin American Library.

From global village to urban legend: the role of the city in the formation of Spanish American dialects
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, December 3, 2004, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
A talk by John Lipski. For more information, call or e-mail Harry Howard at 504.862.3417 or howard@tulane.edu respectively.

Derrida’s Intellectual Legacy: A round table discussion
Newcomb Hall, Room 115
Friday, November 19, 2004, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
“Mr. Derrida was known as the father of deconstruction, the method of inquiry that asserted that all writing was full of confusion and contradition…” The New York Times, 10/11/04. In the wake of bad press in the U.S., join us for a round table discussion of Derrida’s intellectual legacy with former Derrida students and colleages including Jean-Godefroy Bidima (on the founding of the College International de Philosophie, Paris); Erec Koch (on the Derrida-De Man dialogue); Idelber Avelar (on Derrida and the concept of justice); and John Protevi (on Derrida’s contribution to philosophy: from deconstruction to aporia). Free and Open to the public. Sponsored by the Department of French and Italian. For more information, e-mail: mccarren@tulane.edu or call 865-5115.

Steven Volk Lecture
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, November 19, 2004, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Lecture by Steven Volk, Oberlin College and past President of NACLA. For more information, call or e-mail Justin Wolfe at 504.862.8630 or jwolfe@tulane.edu respectively.

“Me están matando pero estoy gozando”: Conga Parades and Rap in Cuba -Today’s Challenges With More or Less the Same Old Backbeat.
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Wednesday, November 17, 2004, 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM
This lecture, by Tomàs Montoya, will be a focus on Cuban “Congas“and Rap Reception to follow. For more information, call or e-mail Debbie Ramil at 504.862.8629 or dramil@tulane.edu respectively. This event is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

Tropical Ecology and Economy: The Ancient Maya and the Living Balinese
Middle American Research Institute (M.A.R.I.), 4th Floor Dinwiddie Hall
Friday, November 12, 2004, 4:00 PM – 5:00

Lecture by Dr.Vernon Scarborough, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Cincinnati, OH. The ancient Maya developed the earliest semitropical primary state, an environment in which resource concentrations were naturally limited. In addition to four months of extended drought, biological resources were dispersed and usually limited in species’ richness, though not in diversity. Accelerated organic decomposition significantly shortened the life of stored surplus as well as affected bacterial contaminates in principal water sources derived from reservoirs. Under these biophysical conditions, how was it possible for a civilization to arise? By examining the ecological and economic trajectory (pathways) of the ancient Maya and then comparing it to the highly textured ethnographic record in present-day tropical Bali, Indonesia, we are able to reassess and evaluate patterns in our ancient Central American data sets that were once less noticed or apparent. Refreshments begin at 3:30 and will continue after the talk so people can hang around to discuss the lecture. This event was in part sponsored by GSSA. For more information, email Stacy Dunn at sdunn@tulane.edu.

Recent Scholarship on the History of Colonial Yucàtan
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, November 11, 2004, 3:30 PM – 6:30 PM

Professor Matthew Restall, Director of Latin American Studies at Pennsylvania State University will discuss recent scholarship on the history and ethnohistory of the Yucátan in the colonial period. He will also discuss his own work and on-going research. Admission is free of charge. Attendance is by invitation only. For more information, call or e-mail Susan Schroeder at 504.862.8616 or sschroe@tulane.edu respectively. The event is sponsored by the Department of History.

Medicinal and Spiritual Connections Between the Foodways of New Orleans and Brasil
Newcomb Women’s Center, Anna E. Many Lounge
Wednesday, November 10, 2004, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Lecture by Dolores Izabel Martins de Barros, M.D., Ph.D.; Visiting Scholar, NCCROW.

La plebe ilustrada: Músicos y danzantes de origen africano en el Perú del siglo XVIII.
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Tuesday, November 9, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Lecture by Juan Carlos Estenssoro Fuchs. Dr. Estenssoro’s second presentation will discuss Afro-Peruvian music and dance in the eighteenth century and its historical significance as a site of interethnic conflict between African and indigenous subjects of the Spanish Crown in the age of Enlightenment reform.

The making of a social history of popular music in Chile (1890-1950): Problems, methods and results
Latin American Library, 4th Floor Howard-Tilton
Monday, November 8, 2004, 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Lecture by Prof. Juan Pablo González. Dr. González (Ph.D. UCLA, 1991) is a full time professor of the Instituto de Música, Universidad Católica de Chile, and president of the Latin American branch of IASPM. He has published more than thirty articles in musicological journals, and presented forty papers in conferences in Latin America, the USA and Europe. He has participated as a guitarist and composer in New Song groups in Santiago, Chile, and Los Angeles, California. His book on the social history of local and international popular music in Chile, co-authored by with the Chilean historian Claudio Rolle, won the IX Prize of Casa de las Americas, Cuba, and will be published in December 2004. For more information, contact Javier León.

How Not to Count the Poor
Room 106, Norman Mayer
Friday, November 5, 2004, 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Lecture by Dr. Sanjay Reddy, Department of Economics Barnard College, Columbia University. In an important 2002 paper, economist Sanjay Reddy and philosopher Thomas Pogge argued that the World Bank’s estimates of the extent, distribution, and trend of global income poverty in the 1990 and 2000/01 World Development Reports are neither meaningful nor reliable. The paper set off a firestorm of criticism and controversy. Dr. Reddy’s off-the-record presentation will cover the inside story of this debate and the politics of poverty measurement within the World Bank and the larger development community. For a copy of the Reddy/Pogge paper or for more information on this event, contact A.W. Pereira at apereir@tulane.edu or (504) 862-8312.

Rethinking the Inquisition
Room 201, Hebert Hall
Friday, November 5, 2004, 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Lecture by Reverend Stalford Poole. In this presentation Father Poole will discuss the complex role of the Inquisition in the Americas and related historiographical trends. For more information, contact Erika Hosselkos.

El simio de Dios: La construcción de la idolatría colonial en el Perú (siglos XVI-XVII).
Latin American Library Conference Room, Howard-Tilton Library 4th Floor
Thursday, November 4, 2004, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Lecture by Juan Carlos Estenssoro Fuchs. In this lecture, Dr. Estenssoro will examine missionary representations of colonial Andean idolatry in official pastoral literature of the period and how these depictions relate to the ecclesiastical campaigns to extirpate traditional native beliefs and ritual practices.

Slavery and its Economic Consequences in Brazil, Jamaica, and the U.S. South
Room 106, Norman Mayer
Friday, October 29, 2004, 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Lecture by Stephen De Castro, Visiting Senior Research Fellow, Tulane University Department of Economics, Universidade de Brasilia, DF Brazil. A reception in the ADST Office (119 Norman Mayer Building) will follow the lecture.

Investigating phonological convergence: Contexts and consequences
Room 308, Newcomb Hall
Thursday, October 28, 2004, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Barbara E. Bullock, Penn State University. In this talk, Bullock reports on the various contexts in which we are examining the effect of one language’s phonology upon that of another and the consequences of a careful empirical investigation of this phenomenon. The convergence contexts to be discussed include Spanish-English code-switching in the US, first language attrition among French-English bilinguals in Frenchville (PA), and finally, a special case of convergence without bilingualism-the effect of Haitian Kreyol on Dominican Spanish.

Linguistic displays of identity among Dominicans in national and diasporic settings
Room 123, Newcomb Hall
Wednesday, October 27, 2004, 4:15 PM – 5:15 PM

Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, Penn State University. This presentation probes and theorizes several case studies of linguistic practices and identity formation among Dominicans in national and diasporic settings. The exploration converges in identifying the unifying and separatist functions achieved by language choice in the construction and display of multiple social identities and additionally foregrounds the scripts of position and potential that may be operationalized through the control of linguistic repertoires in specific social configurations. The approach adopted is sociolinguistic in nature, but is enriched by current social theorizing about language, discourse, and social relationships.

Orlando Rojas Lecture
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Wednesday, October 27, 2004, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Lecture by Cuban film director (Las Noches de Constantinopla, Papeles Secundarios) and presentations of clips of his work. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Debbie Ramil at 504.862.8629 or dramil@tulane.edu respectively. This event is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.

Nest Predation, Climate Change, and Bird Extinctions On A Neotropical Island
301 Alcee Fortier
Wednesday, October 25, 2004, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

This talk will be given by Dr. Douglas Robinson, Department of Fisheries and Wild Life, Oregon State University. Dr. Robinson has conducted field work for about ten years on Barro Colorado Island (former Canal Zone), Panama, and surrounding lowland monsoon forest areas. His studies include bird populations and the factors that make them susceptible to the effects of forest fragmentation and other environmental problems created by humans. Barro Colorado Island is a relatively well studied “natural experiment” on a major effect of fragmentation when it was isolated from the surrounding forest by the rising water of Gatun Lake, formed as part of the Panama Canal. Dr. Robinson has studied birds’ susceptibility to local population extinction, as well as their survival, dispersal, and reproduction. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Thomas Sherry at 504.865.5191 or tsherry@tulane.edu respectively. This event is sponsored by Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

People Over Profit: NISGUA’s Fall Tour (Spanish Only)
Anna Many Lounge, Caroline Richardson Hall, Center for Research on Women
Monday, October 25, 2004, 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

NISGUA’s Fall Tour, 2004 (Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala) features: Arnaldo Yat, Maya Q’eqchi’ organizer and trainer, will talk about the struggle to reclaim the human, economic and cultural rights of Indigenous peoples in Guatemala. Among the topics he will discuss are Land Rights and Eviction, Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) and Plan Puebla-Panama, US Business, Mining and Indigenous Rights, and Effect of Militarization on Society.

People Over Profit: NISGUA’s Fall Tour (With English Translation)
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Sunday, October 24, 2004, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

With English Translation. NISGUA’s Fall Tour, 2004 (Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala) features: Arnaldo Yat, Maya Q’eqchi’ organizer and trainer, will talk about the struggle to reclaim the human, economic and cultural rights of Indigenous peoples in Guatemala. Among the topics he will discuss are Land Rights and Eviction, Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) and Plan Puebla-Panama, US Business, Mining and Indigenous Rights, and Effect of Militarization on Society.

Merengue: Dominican Music and Dominican Identity Lecture and Performance
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Thursday, October 21, 2004, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Merengue: Dominican Music and Dominican Identity Lecture and Performance by Ethnomusicologist Musician Professor Paul Austerlitz. Reception to follow. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Marilyn Miller at 504.862.3423 or mgmiller@tulane.edu respectively.

Latin America Outside the Tenure Track: Non-University Paths to Work in/on Latin America
Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
Friday, September 17, 2004, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Steven Volk, Oberlin College and past President of NACLA will share insights and advice on non-academic career paths for Latinamericanist students. Reception to follow. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call or e-mail Justin Wolfe at 504.862.8630 or jwolfe@tulane.edu respectively. This event is being hosted by Latin American Studies.

The Right African Mix: Peoples of the African Diaspora in Belize
Middle American Research Institute (M.A.R.I.), 4th Floor Dinwiddie Hall
Friday, September 10, 2004, 4:00 PM
Dr. Donna Bonner of the African Diaspora Department presents a lecture on the diversity in Belize. Refreshments at 3:30. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. The event is being hosted by Latin American Studies, and is sponsored by TASA & GSSA.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

MEDIA

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

Talk with Noah Bullock: What is a Human Rights Approach?

View Full Event Description

Noah Bullock, the Executive Director at Cristosal, will be giving a talk entitled: What is a Human Rights Approach? This talk is part of Tulane University’s celebration of International Education Week which highlights the benefits of international exchange on campus. IEW at Tulane runs from October 16th- October 20th. More information about the Tulane IEW and the events on campus can be found here.

Olancho Screening-New Orleans Film Festival

View Full Event Description

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following screenings for the New Orleans Film Festival, which will run from October 11th-19th. Screenings are held at various locations in New Orleans. The box office is located at the Ace Hotel (600 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, LA 70130).

OLANCHO

28th Annual New Orleans Film Festival to Feature Latinx Programming

View Full Event Description

The 28th Annual New Orleans Film Festival will be held from October 11th to October 19th at participating theaters in the New Orleans area. Born in a city known for its eclectic and artistic vibrancy, the New Orleans Film Festival (NOFF) has sought out bold and passionate storytellers since 1989. It is the longest-running festival of its kind in the state of Louisiana and one of the largest film festivals in the South. Now in its 28th year, the New Orleans Film Festival has grown into an internationally respected annual event that attracts 20-25k people, 400+ filmmakers, and 240 films.

This year’s film festival will feature a number of films relating to the Latin American community, either in subject matter and/or made by Latin American filmmakers. The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute will be sponsoring several films, including Olancho and Cuban Short Stories.

A full list of film selections and synopses may be found here.

For more information on tickets, passes, and film packages, visit the NOFF website.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following films:

Olancho
Manuel, a farmer from Olancho, Honduras, seeks fame by making music for the region’s drug cartels. When some of his song lyrics get him in trouble, he must make the most difficult decision of his life: continue the quest for fame, or flee. For information on times and locations, visit the Olancho event page.

Cuban Shorts: Cine Cubano
These Cuban short stories are a series of short films highlight cultural and social subject manner relating to the Cuban community. For more information on show times and locations, visit the event page.

Fighting Cuba’s Boxing Ban
A short documentary about female boxing in Cuba, where the Cuban government forbade women from competing in the 2016 summer olympics.

Manuel
A short documentary about an 87-year-old Cuban man who brews and sells potions said to be aphrodisiacs.

Parade
Jazz students from New Orleans travel to Cuba on a cultural exchange and collaborate on a parade, celebrating open borders.

Connection (Conectifai)
A portrait of a park in Havana where, thanks to public Wi-Fi, a new kind of meeting place has arisen.

Charlie
Four decades after hijacking a plane to Cuba to avoid charges of killing a state trooper, a former black power militant reflects on his past in a letter to his nine-year-old Cuban son.

Forever, Comandante (Hasta Siempre, Comandante)
Living in the shadow of the revolutionary generation’s unrelenting Cuban ideals, Ernesto, a 14-year-old barber, wants to get a tattoo despite his father’s adamant objection.

Prince of Smoke
Cuban tobacco farmer and artisanal cigar maker Hirochi Robaina follows in his legendary grandfather’s footsteps as he fights to preserve a 171-year-old family legacy.

Additional titles relating to the Latin American community include:

The Thunder Feast (Truenos de San Juan)
A documentary about the ancient festival of San Juanito in Guanajuato where homemade explosives are part of the revelry, but not everyone in the community is sure this tradition should continue.

Sambá
A documentary about Cisco, a Dominican-born man who returns to the Dominican Republic after doing time in a United State prison. Cisco soon finds that the only way he can make money is getting involved in loosely organized street fighting.

Days of Wholesome Joy
A Cuban narrative short about a woman taking care of her grandmother who has dementia.

Holy Hill
A narrative short story about a nun who works at a school for young boys in the Dominican Republic. Both she and the boys have parallel sexual awakenings.

Camp of the Innocents
A Louisiana-made short documentary about the U.S. interment of Latin American “enemy aliens” during World War II in New Orleans. The entire synopsis, as well as show times and location may be found here.

Dead Horses
A Catalan animated short film about a child fleeing his home during wartime.

Bells in the Mountains
A Spanish short documentary about a group of cows who migrate seasonally from the town of Ullé through the foothills of the Spanish Pyrenees Mountains.

Elegy
A short narrative film about a girl who cannot process her complicated feelings about the death of her two classmates.

Cuban Shorts: Cine Cubano-New Orleans Film Festival

View Full Event Description

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University are sponsoring the following screenings for the New Orleans Film Festival, which will run from October 11th-19th. Screenings are held at various locations in New Orleans. The box office is located at the Ace Hotel (600 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, LA 70130).

CUBAN SHORTS: CINE CUBANO

  • Saturday, October 14th 1:00PM | Member $10 General $13
  • Thursday, October 19th 11:30AM | Members $7 General $10

Tulane to host MET Curator Dr. Joanne Pillsbury for talk on Luxury Arts in the Ancient Americas

View Full Event Description

Dr. Joanne Pillsbury, the Andrall E. Pearson Curator of the Art of the Ancient Americas at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will give a presentation titled From the Heart of the Andes: On Creating Golden Kingdoms, as part of the 2017 Wladis Seminar on Curatorial Careers at the Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Dr. Pillsbury will give a behind-the-scenes view of the exhibition Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas (Getty Research Institute and Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fall 2017-Spring 2018), and the international research project that inspired it. Drawing upon significant recent archaeological findings and new investigations into the roles of artists, their patrons, and their workshops, the lecture focuses on luxury arts in the lands between the two great imperial capitals of the ancient Americas: Cusco, the seat of the Inca state, and Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital. It probes a fundamental question: How can we discern and interpret indigenous ideas of value?

Dr. Pillsbury is a specialist in the art and archaeology of the Precolumbian Americas. Pillsbury earned her PhD from Columbia University. She was previously associate director of the Getty Research Institute and director of Precolumbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks. She is the author, editor, or co-editor of numerous publications, including the three-volume Guide to Documentary Sources for Andean Studies, 1530–1900 (2008), the Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Award recipient Ancient Maya Art at Dumbarton Oaks (2012), and Past Presented: Archaeological Illustration and the Ancient Americas (2012), which was awarded the Association for Latin American Art Book Award.

The lecture is sponsored by the Newcomb Art Department, supported by a gift from Mark and Diane Wladis.

For more information contact Dr. Elizabeth Boone via email to eboone@tulane.edu.

For more information, view the official flyer here.

Tulane to host Dr. Andrew Paxman for a talk on William Jenkins and the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming historian and biographer Dr. Andrew Paxman, who will present his research and recent book in a talk titled William Jenkins: Profiteer of the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema on October 19th.

In his talk, Dr. Paxman will focus on the life and film industry activities of William Jenkins, an American from humble beginnings who became the richest man in Mexico. Using biographical information and excerpts from his recent book Jenkins of Mexico: How a Southern Farm Boy Became a Mexican Magnate, Dr. Paxman will highlight how the American entrepreneur built up the Mexican film industry.

Currently, Dr. Paxman is a research professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE) in Mexico, where he teaches history and journalism. Earlier in his career, Dr. Paxman was a journalist in Mexico and co-authored El Tigre: Emilio Azcárraga y su imperio Televisa (2000). He earned a Masters in Latin American Studies from University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD in History from the University of Texas, Austin.