Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Stone Center Policies & Procedures

One of our most important challenges as an interdisciplinary Center is to allow scholars from different disciplines at different levels with different academic goals and professional backgrounds to achieve a common purpose. The following policies and procedures have been created to facilitate this cooperation by allowing faculty, staff, and students to more easily navigate through our common professional and academic environment.

General Guidelines for Center Facilities and Equipment

Main Office

The Stone Center is open from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Guidelines for use by staff and student workers are as follows:

  • Student workers arrange their schedules with the Assistant Director of Administration.
  • In the office environment student workers are expected to wear professional attire. We discourage the use of cell phones in the office.
  • Phone messages should include the date, time and signature of message taker.
  • Work areas must be kept neat and projects put away at the end of the day.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • If you are unable to report to work, please call your supervisor immediately.
  • Persons requesting appointments with the Executive Director should be referred to the Assistant Director of Administration, who maintains his calendar.
  • The Administrative Secretary keeps an inventory of office supplies, stationery, etc. Please notify her if you are using the last item or when supplies are low.
  • Center’s stationery is for official Stone Center business only. The standard Center format is to use 12pt. Arial font, and set top margin at 1.25”, bottom margin at 1”, left margin at 2” and right margin at .75.”
  • Students/TAs may receive faxes but may not use Center phones for long distance calls or to send faxes.
  • Reserve class readings are located in the reception area. Students should follow their professor’s guidelines for checking out readings. We do not make copies here.
  • The Center has a plan in effect for safeguarding our property during hurricane season. The president’s office will announce when the University will close – this information can be obtained by calling the Tulane Alert Line 862-8080 or 1-877-662-8000.
  • The last person out of the main office is responsible for securing both locks.

Greenleaf Conference Room (Jones Hall 100A) Guidelines

  • In order to reserve the Greenleaf Conference Room you must first contact the Stone Center Administrative Secretary. After confirming that the room is available on the date requested, you must come into the Stone Center to fill out the appropriate paperwork to officially reserve the date.
  • The conference room is a ‘€œsmart‘€ classroom. It has built-in video, DVD, and computer (Internet, PowerPoint, etc.) and projection capabilities.
  • Other Audiovisual equipment (overhead projector, slide projector) is available but must be reserved at least five days before the event (form available from the Stone Center’s Administrative Secretary).
  • Prior authorization is required for use of all Conference Room equipment.
  • Conference room will be available one half-hour prior to the event.
  • A university faculty or staff member needs to be present during the event at all times.
  • Functions are usually held during regular business hours (8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.) unless otherwise arranged.
  • University Security is needed when alcoholic beverages are served, when attendance is over 20 people, or when events are held after dark. The sponsoring department is responsible for contacting and paying for University Security.
  • Conference room key should be left on the table in the Conference room after end of event. The door locks automatically.
  • The Stone Center staff does not provide event support (this includes setting up equipment.) Facilities Services should be contacted for additional setup.
  • Sponsoring Department is responsible for returning Conference Room to its original condition. Please place all trash in the dumpster located in the back of the building (in front of the UC).
  • Priority use will be given to Stone Center events, committees, core seminars, official student organizations, associated institutes, councils and affiliated faculty. We do not generally make the Conference Room available for classes, which remove the room from service for other special events for the entire semester.

Stone Center Lounge (Jones Hall 101) Guidelines

This space plays an important role for Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Latin American Studies. It is a place of information (bulletin boards and mailboxes), congregation (tables and coffee), and sustenance (food). Informal meetings are frequently held there. This room is open 8:30 to 5:00 work days and by special arrangement.

  • Center staff empties the refrigerator on Friday evenings; we do not save left over food, containers, etc.
  • If you need to post a notice on the bulletin boards, please see the Administrative Secretary. Do not post notices on walls or doors.

Stone Center Teaching Assistant‘€™s Office (Jones Hall 103-D) Guidelines

Each year a group of doctoral candidates in Latin American Studies teach over 180 undergraduates. They share an office in Jones Hall 103-D, where they prepare courses and meet with students. The Stone Center has adopted a number of guidelines about the use of the room because so many individuals with distinct preferences and work habits share it.

  • The TA‘€™s office should never be left open.
  • If you have a problem with the computer, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ can assist in solving most software related problems. If the ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.
  • The Administrative Secretary keeps an inventory of office supplies, stationery, etc.
  • TA‘€™s may receive faxes but may not use Center phones for long distance calls or to send faxes.
  • Work areas must be kept neat and projects put away at the end of the day.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • Do not use walls and doors to post notices; a bulletin board is provided.
  • The TA office is for the exclusive use of Teaching Assistants for Latin American Studies courses.

George H. Norton Latin American Studies Graduate Student Lounge (Jones Hall 107) Guidelines

In 1999, graduate students requested that the Stone Center try to provide space for them to congregate in or near Jones Hall. We were able to secure permission to renovate one unassigned space, Jones Hall 107. The George H. Norton Graduate Student Lounge (named for the donor whose son received a Masters in Latin American Studies from Tulane in 1991) is accessible 24 hours a day – 7 days a week to all graduate students in the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. The lounge is equipped with workspace, a computer with Internet connection, telephone (865-5174), chalkboard, bulletin boards, sofas, and chairs for relaxation and meetings.

  • You may pick up your key from the Administrative Secretary and will be responsible for returning key to her at the end of school year. Keys are non-transferable and cannot be duplicated. Lost keys may be replaced for a $5.00 fee.
  • To ensure student safety, doors should never be left unlocked. The building is usually open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. If you find that you can‘€™t get in the building, please contact the Department of Public Safety at x5381.
  • In case of emergency (after hours), please contact the Department of Public Safety at x5200.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • The telephone can only be used for local calls, unless you are making a collect or credit card call.
  • The George N. Norton Graduate Student Lounge should only be used by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies students. Consult the Assistant Director of Administration in case of special situations.
  • If you have a problem with the computer, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ can assist in solving most software related problems. If the ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.
  • The Center will supply two black ink printer cartridges and four reams (4 packs of 500 pages each) of paper per month for the computer and printer. Please see the administrative secretary for supplies. Given these fixed monthly limits please be judicious in your use of these supplies and considerate of the usage needs of your fellow graduate students.

Equipment

Stone Center Copier, Computers, Fax Machine, Typewriter, Phone System, the copier, computers, printers, fax and typewriter are for the use of the Stone Center staff. Consult the Assistant Director of Administration in case of emergencies that require their use by non-Center staff.

TA Copy/Scanner Privileges Guidelines

The Center recognizes that TAs represent the most important “teaching” constituency of its undergraduate academic program. The Center also recognizes that it is necessary to make copies of exams and quizzes and that, at times, having handouts for classes is central to successful teaching. There are various ways to do this, including copying and, when possible, posting them ahead of time on-line as electronic files. The easiest and most environmentally friendly method is the latter: post documents on Blackboard and have the students print them themselves. This allows you to upload handouts and documents from wherever you‘€™re working and spares you a trip to the Center. For non-original documents (articles) we now have a high-speed scanner that allows you to convert Xeroxed articles into electronic files and upload them to Blackboard. You can also submit articles to the library to post on Electronic Reserves. Considering these options, your last resort should be Xeroxing. Post assignments whenever possible.

Scanner

The scanner is located in Jones 103, the TAs office. Because it only accepts single sheets of paper (not books or magazines) you need to Xerox materials first. You can then e-mail them to yourself from the computer or upload them directly to blackboard. We will have a quick (it‘€™s very easy) training session at TA orientation each semester.

Copies

The Center‘€™s photocopier machine is available for TAs to use in order to facilitate quality classroom instruction. However, TA usage of the Center’s photocopier must be coordinated with that of the Center’s other administrative and curricular business. To help better coordinate this usage, the following guidelines have been established to make efficient use of the photocopier to support the Center’s teaching and administrative goals.

  • As with the scanner, the Center’s copier is available from 8:30am to 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. For after-hours copying, TAs can request a Copy Card from the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Affairs to be used in the Library or may use the on-campus FEDEX KINKOS located in the University Center with pre-approval from the Assistant Director of Administration on a reimbursement basis.
  • TAs should only copy from loose-leaf originals. Copying materials directly from bound textbooks, monographs, or journals should be undertaken at the library.
  • TAs will have a maximum photocopy limit of 10 pages per enrolled student for each semester. Final enrollments as of the last day to add into the class will be the benchmark for student enrollment numbers.
  • Each TA will be assigned a unique user code.
  • From 12-1pm, TAs will have preferential use of the photocopy machine. However, TAs should recognize that Center staff may also need to use the copier during these hours and thus TAs should be willing to work with Center staff in sharing copier usage during these times. Center staff will show TAs the same courtesy during the other hours of the day.
  • As a common courtesy, TAs should always inquire as to the machine’s availability before using it. Common courtesy also dictates that TAs should not simply expect that the photocopy machine is available upon demand.
  • TAs should attempt to spend no more than 10 minutes occupying the photocopy machine per session.
  • TAs should copy only materials that are relevant to the classes that they are teaching for the Center. Personal use of the Center‘€™s copier is prohibited.
  • TAs are expected to comply with all copyright laws.
  • TAs should respect the fact that Center staff will be working nearby as they are using the machine and should thus work as efficiently and as quietly as possible in making their photocopies.
  • Abuse of photocopying privileges by one TA will affect the privileges for all TAs.

TV/VCR

There is a TV/VCR for TAs use. Please reserve with Administrative Secretary.

Maps, Slide Projectors, Overhead Projectors, Extension Cords

All maps, slide projectors, overhead projectors and extension cords must be reserved and then checked back in to the Administrative Secretary at the front desk. Do not leave slide projectors or overhead projectors in Room 103-D unless it is after 5:00 p.m. If you are using the equipment after hours, call and leave a message at x5164 to let us know that the equipment is in Room 103-D.

Computers

When a computer problem arises, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The “Help Desk” can assist in solving most software related problems. If the “Help Desk” determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.

Report all other equipment breakdowns to the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.

Equipment should be reserved a week in advance. We do not reserve equipment for a whole semester.

Policies and Procedures Specific to Faculty and Staff

The official version of the Staff Handbook is available online.

The official version of the Faculty Handbook is the latest dated version in the University Archives. Each time a change is made, the Office of Academic Affairs will place a new version in the University Archives. The latest dated version in the University Archives controls if there is any difference between it and this web version, or between it and any printed version noted below.

The Faculty Handbook will also be distributed in hard copy to all deans, department chairs, and program chairs each summer. When changes occur, a hard copy of the revised section will also be forwarded, on a timely basis, to these same individuals. A limited number of additional copies will be printed and made available to any faculty member on request, on a first-come, first-serve basis. However, these faculty members will not receive any notices of changes. Of course, one may download the Faculty Handbook from the following website, http://www.tulane.edu/~fachand/.

Financial Support for Affiliated Faculty, Staff, and Students

For all Grant and Funding information (travel, guest lecturer/performer, business meal, special projects etc.), please visit our Grants & Funding page.

Service Learning

Course Development: Integrating Service Learning
There are several ways that faculty incorporate service learning into their courses:

Within a 3 credit course
Students are required to do the service component of the course. All students are required to do at least 20 hours of service in addition to any orientations and rap sessions. Students should have a reflective piece integrated into class lecture, rap sessions and paper requirements (journals or other written assignments).

As an option within a 3 credit course
Students are given an option to do service learning or a research paper. Students electing to do service learning will be required to do at least 20 hours of service in addition to any orientations and rap sessions. Students should have a reflective piece integrated in class discussions, rap sessions and paper assignments (journals or other written assignments).

A fourth credit option
Faculty may use this as a requirement or as an option. The fourth-credit requirements are clearly defined in a document approved by the LAS faculty (December 1997). Students must complete at least 40 hours of service (could be inclusive of rap sessions and orientations), have a reflective piece (rap sessions, journals, class lecture integration, class discussion), and complete a product that can be evaluated at the end of the semester (paper, project completed at the agency). The department must list the 189 or 389 course designation as a one-credit course in which students can enroll.

Requirements for Service Learning in Academic Courses
Service learning may be incorporated into a 3-credit academic course, with the approval of the faculty member‘€™s department and LAS curriculum Committee. If course credit is to be offered specifically for a service learning experience, the following procedure, approved by the LAS faculty on December 3, 1997, should be followed:

In conjunction with the didactic three-credit course (beyond the 100 level), students may be offered the opportunity to sign up for a one-credit course in service learning. The faculty member offering the course will decide whether a service learning experience is available. Similarly, the student should have the option to decline to participate in service learning.

In order to set up a service-learning course, the Department contacts Kim Echols, at the Registrar’s office (x5231), who will list a one-credit course in Service Learning. Each course offered with a service learning add-on must receive a separate listing, using the Department prefix plus the numbers “189 or 389” and a section number. A student taking the additional course credit in service learning will:

Spend at least 40 hours in a community setting during the semester

Complete a “reflection” component, such as a journal or a diary or weekly meetings of a group of peer volunteers that will allow the student to describe and evaluate his/her experiences with the activity.

Complete a product that can be evaluated at the end of the semester – this might involve producing some work that will be of benefit to the community organization (e.g., a brochure, a data management system, a plan for staff organization) or it might be a review paper concerning theories and knowledge in the area of the student’s activity, etc. Meet regularly with his/her instructor to discuss the service learning experience, so that it can be monitored and, if necessary, reoriented, and will be based on demonstrated learning – not merely on hours of service completed.

Students who are placed at an agency as part of Tulane’s work-study cannot carry out service learning hours at the same site. Students will not be remunerated in any monetary form from the enrollment in and completion of a service-learning course.

Research and Project Associate Proposals
For proposal guidelines and materials, please visit our Stone Center Forms resource.

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Upcoming Events

LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship

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The Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) is pleased to announce its Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship. This full-day event will include a series of presentations featuring graduate students, faculty, and local leaders working at the intersection of academia and community. All are welcome to attend one or more of three talks. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.


SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

9 – 9:30 AM | Breakfast

9:30 – 11 AM | “The Role of the Arts in Community Engagement and Activism”
Moderator: Megan Flattley (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Jeffery U. Darensbourg (Tribal Councilperson and enrolled member of the Atakapa-Ishak Nation of Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas), Gabrielle Garcia Steib (Media Artist and Writer), Dr. Edith Wolfe (Stone Center Assistant Director for Undergraduate Programs)

11 – 11:30 AM | Break/Networking

11:30 – 1 PM | “Co-Creating Digital Testimonios with Latinx Youth: A Community-Engaged Approach to Scholarship and Action”
Presenters: Jennifer Miller Scarnato (City, Culture & Community PhD Candidate) and Rebeca Sauly Santa María Granados (Youth Member of Puentes)
Discussion Moderator: Dr. James D. Huck, Jr. (Stone Center Assistant Director for Graduate Programs and Puentes Board Member)

1 – 2 PM | Lunch

2 – 3:30 PM | “Guiding Principles and Strategies: The Social Sciences and Community Engagement”
Moderator: Carolina Timoteo de Oliveira (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Claudia Chávez-Arguelles (Tulane Anthropology Faculty), Ruth Idakula (Critical Race Theory & Anti-Racist Praxis educator and facilitator), and Linett Luna Tovar (Stone Center Masters Program Alumna)

3:30 – 4:30 | Networking/Wrap-up

The LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship is co-sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Tulane Mellon Graduate Program in Community-Engaged Scholarship.

Latin American Writers Series: Damián Cabrera

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Join us for an interview with Damián Cabrera about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Damián Cabrera was born in Asunción Paraguay and grew up in Alto Paraná along the Brazilian border. His publications, which explore the realities of the Triple Frontier, include one collection of short stories, sh… horas de contar… (2006) and the novels Xiru (2012)—winner of the Roque Gaona Prize—and Xe (2019). Cabrera has served as editor of the journals El Tereré (2006-2012) and Ku’Ótro (2008) and is an active member of artistic organizations such as Semenario Espacio/Crítico and Ediciones de la Ura. He also teaches film at the Universidad Columbia de Paraguay and art and design at the Universidad Nacional de Paraguay.

The 2020 Dr. H. Barry and Lucy V. Holt Lecture in Ethnohistory: "City of Blood, City of Flowers: Why the Aztecs Enchant Us"

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Tulane Department of History, and the Middle American Research Institute invite you to the 2020 Dr. H. Barry and Lucy V. Holt Lecture in Ethnohistory: “City of Blood, City of Flowers: Why the Aztecs Enchant Us” presented by Dr. Davíd Carrasco.

Davíd Carrasco is the Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America at Harvard University. A historian of religions with a particular interest in Mesoamerican cities and the Mexican-American borderlands, Carrasco’s wide-ranging work has explored the challenges of postcolonial ethnography and theory as well as the practices and symbolic nature of ritual violence in comparative perspective. In conjunction with Mexican archaeologists, he has carried out research in excavations and archives associated with the sites of Teotihuacan and Mexico-Tenochtitlan resulting in books such as Religions of Mesoamerica, City of Sacrifice, To Change Place, and Quetzalcoatl and the Irony of Empire. Carrasco’s work has also traced the religious dimensions of the Latino experience, exploring themes such as mestizaje, the myth of Aztlan, transculturation, and La Virgen de Guadalupe. Most recently, Carrasco oversaw production of a documentary about his longtime friend and Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison. He edited and contributed to the companion volume Goodness & the Literary Imagination. Carrasco is a recipient of the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor the Mexican government gives to a foreign national.

The lecture is being held in conjunction with the Tulane Maya Symposium and will be followed by light refreshments before the keynote address by Dorie Reents-Budet. Both the Holt Lecture and keynote address are free and open to the public.

Teaching the Maya through Food: K-12 Teacher Workshop

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Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

REGISTER HERE FOR $5 ONLY

In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from Maya Master Teacher, Ellen Cohen, Anthropologist and researcher of chocolate, Professor Kathryn Sampeck and Kaqchikel language scholar from Guatemala, Ixnal Cuma Chávez who will discuss the importance of the tortilla and tamal in contemporary Maya traditions.

REGISTER HERE.

Workshop Objectives:

  • Provide a general introduction to the geography of the Maya
  • Introduce new perspectives to teaching the Maya through culinary traditions
  • Share hands-on lessons and activities that inspire learners to better understand ancient and contemporary Maya

Sponsored by Tulane University’s AfterCLASS, the Middle American Research Institute, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and S.S. NOLA.

For more information, please call 504.862.3143 or email crcrts@tulane.edu.

Latin American Writers Series: Andrea Palet

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Join us for an interview with Andrea Palet about her life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Andrea Palet is an editor, columnist, and educator from Chile. With almost three decades of experience in the publishing field, she has edited magazines and books in both Europe and South America. In 2014, she became the founding editorial director of Editorial Laurel in Santiago, Chile. Under her leadership, the house has released the works of more than 20 novelists, essayists, and chroniclers. Palet also oversees the Master of Editing program at the Universidad de Diego Portales. A collection of her columns, Leo y olvido, was released in 2018 by Ediciones Bastante.

Latin American Writers Series: Rodrigo Fuentes

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Join us for an interview with Rodrigo Fuentes about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Rodrigo Fuentes is a Guatemalan-born writer of short stories. He received the II Premio Centroamericano Carátula in 2014, and his collection Trucha Panza arriba was a finalist for the 2018 Premio Gabriel García Márquez . His works have been published in Guatemala, Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, El Salvador, as well as in translation in France and Scotland. Fuentes is also the co-founder and editor of the magazine Suelta and of the digital publishing house and literary journal Traviesa. He currently teaches in the Department of Spanish at College of the Holy Cross.