Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

The 9th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods

February 11th, 2017
9 AM- 3 PM

Green Leaf Conference Room, Jones Hall

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Not for Credit.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture? Tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives in a ministry archive? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: how do you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. Take your research project ideas to the next step, whatever that may be, including raising travel grants. Join this to learn how to:

  • Plan more efficient, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Build your epistemological and grant-wiring vocabulary
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate among research methods (and course offerings on campus)
  • Become a better researcher and fieldwork team-member

This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. We will brainstorm alternatives, compare research approaches, ask tough questions, and share advice. Think differently about your topic, questions, study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. Get inspired with some fresh ideas and strategies. Form student networks to continue learning.

Your workshop organizer is Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Prof Murphy has experience leading engaged workshops and seminars on research methods across disciplines.

The workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students in any year. Graduate students from other programs are welcome, if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with “human subjects” (live people!).

Sign Up!
Space is limited. To register, email Laura Murphy with your name, cellphone, department and degree program, year at Tulane, prior research design and methods experiences. Include a short statement of your research topic and needs (i.e., plan summer field research).

For more information: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.




All Events

Upcoming Events

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

View Full Event Description

Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Office of Multicultural Affairs: International Food and Music Festival

View Full Event Description

The International Food and Music Festival is a tradition for Tulane University and the surrounding New Orleans community. It is not possible without the participation of the international community at Tulane. We need your help to represent your culture, country, or community. Share food, crafts, cultural history, language, performance, and have fun at this beautiful outdoor festival.

This event is FREE for all Tulane faculty, staff and students. You must present your Splash Card. Non-affiliated Tulane attendees can purchase tickets here.

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here for more information and registration.

If you have questions, email or

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pave

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! End your Friday afternoon on the Jones Hall patio with a classic Brazilian layer dessert. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Chantalle Verna to Present Research on U.S. and Haitian Relationships in Post-Occupation Haiti

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Chantalle Verna for a talk on her book Haiti and the Uses of America: Post- U.S. Occupation Promises on April 26, 2018, at 6:00 PM.

In her book, Dr. Verna makes evident that there have been key moments of cooperation that contributed to nation-building in both countries. Dr. Verna emphasizes the importance of examining the post-occupation period: the decades that followed the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and considering how Haiti’s public officials and privileged citizens rationalized nurturing ties with the United States at the very moment when the two nations began negotiating the reinstatement of Haitian sovereignty in 1930. Their efforts, Dr. Verna shows, helped favorable ideas about the United States, once held by a small segment of Haitian society, circulate more widely. In this way, Haitians contributed to and capitalized upon the spread of internationalism in the Americas and the larger world.

Dr. Verna received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently a professor in the History Department in Florida International University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Verna focuses on the culture of foreign relations, specifically concerning Haiti and the United States during the mid-twentieth century.