Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

XIII Annual Tulane Undergraduate Conference on Latin America

November 21st, 2015
9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Jones Hall 102 and 108

The Stone Center’s annual TUCLA conference is an interdisciplinary undergraduate symposium in which seniors from the Latin American Studies core seminar present their individual research projects. TUCLA was formally launched in Fall of 2003 as a means to provide Latin American Studies undergraduates with an opportunity to present papers in the style and atmosphere of an academic conference. The conference is designed to enlist all of Tulane’s Latin American Studies seniors in a shared discussion of the region, its society and its cultures.

Please join us for the thirteenth annual conference. This event is free and open to the public.
TUCLA is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Session I 9:00-10:45
Patriarchy and Power: Sex, Vulnerability and Social Control
Sean Cashman, Separate but Equal: How the Cuban Medical Journal Sexología y Sociedad Reinforces Gender Polarity
Lucy Lloyd, Taís Araújo’s Black Protagonists and the Contradictions of Race in Contemporary Brazil
Alana Neuman, As Novas Meninas no Bairro: Brazil’s Grafiteiras and Gender-Based Social Movements
Kade Kistner, The Human Trafficking Epidemic in Costa Rica
Discussant: Beth Manley, Department of History, Xavier University

Peripheral Vision: Representation, Visibility and the Cultures of Citizenship
Ariel Bernstein, Dancing with el Diablo: The Commercialization of Afro-Peruvian Cultural Expression
Henry Green, “Gozando en La Habana:” Reggaetòn as Cuban Patrimony
Caleb Gardner, Funk Carioca and Paulista: Commodification of Peripheral Identity and Culture
Jonah Mantell, Interpretations of Pixação: The Street Art Everyone Sees and No One Understands
Discussant: Chris Dunn, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Session II 11:00-12:15
Por la razón o la fuerza: Conflict and Contradiction in Contemporary Chile
Carlin O’Brien, Praise Pinochet: Chile’s Enduring Devotion to its Dictator
Jacob McGuire, An “Education Earthquake”? The Evolution and Effectiveness of Mass StudentProtests in Chile
Nikki Stouman, Indigenous Policy and the Contradictory Language of Human Rights in Chile
Discussant: Melanie Huska, Department of History

Bold Type: Identity Politics and the Power of the Press
Lucy Leonard,,Dios, patria… y libertad? Debating Democracy and the Press under Ecuador’s CorreaAdministration
Currin Wallis, Re-Typing Tradition: New Black Press and the Afro-Argentine Struggle for CulturalCitizenship
Molly McConnell, Redressing ‘Pelé in a Skirt’: Futebol Feminino in Brazilian Social Media
Discussant: Mauro Porto, Department of Communication

Lunch 12:15-1:00

Session III 1:15 – 3:00
Unmapped Territory: Land and Indigeneity in the Age of Globalization
Michael Hammer, San Blas Albatross: Questioning Sustainability in the Tourism Practices of Panama’s Kuna Yala
Jackie Siegmund, To Find Fun in an Urban Place: Manaus’ Tourist Infrastructure and its Implications for Urban Tourism
Julie Gamze, “This land for us is sacred”: Guarani Indigeneity and Land Demarcation on São Paulo’s Urban Periphery
Brian Lipson, Indigenous Autonomy in the Commodification of Bolivian Quinoa
Discussant: Amalia Leguizamón, Department of Sociology

Public Health and the Public Sphere: Medicine, Politics and Communication
Erin Brock, “God Willing, Guatemala Will Improve”: Cultural Competency and Chronic Malnutrition in Rural Guatemala
Lydia Norby-Adams, Makelawen Medicine? The Pharmaceutical Commercialization of Traditional Mapuche Practice
Diane Kowalski, Political Diagnosis: Brazil’s Cuban Doctors Controversy and the Failure of the State
Discussant: Hannah Kaufman, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Click here to view the TUCLA flyer.




All Events

Upcoming Events

Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture

View Full Event Description

Join Dr. Emily Greenwood as she will be speaking about Greek language/literature, slavery, and the “politics of the human” when she delivers the Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture.

Emily Greenwood is Professor and Chair of the Classics Department at Yale University where she also holds a joint appointment in African American Studies. She is one of the pre-eminent thinkers on Greek historiography of her generation as well as the leading figure in re-evaluating the legacy of Graeco-Roman culture in colonial and post-colonial contexts. In addition to her book Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford 2010) [Joint winner of the Runciman Prize], she has published over a dozen articles and book chapters that investigate the rich and nuanced reception of ancient Greek literature in the African Diaspora, especially in Caribbean literature.

Africana Studies Brown Bag Lecture with Prof. Dan Sharp

View Full Event Description

“Naná Vasconcelos: Afro-Brazilian Percussion in Paris and New York City”

Dan Sharp is currently research for a book that revolves around the 1980 album Saudades by Afro-Brazilian Naná Vasconcelos. The book will situate Naná‘s reimagining of percussion and voice in the context of his itinerant life in New York, Europe and Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. Snacks provided!

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

View Full Event Description

What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at