Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Workshop: Applying for Grants and Fellowships

October 9th, 2015
3:30-5:00 PM

Location
Dinwiddie Hall Room 103

This workshop targets SLA graduate students who are new to grant writing and submission. The workshop will provide tips on searching for funding opportunities and writing an award winning proposal. Grant writing is a significant intellectual activity that is in high demand in many academic fields, economic sectors, and firms and organizations. For academics, grant writing not only raises one’s research visibility but can increase opportunities for writing and national and international presentations. For non-academics, grant writing can open doors to consulting, collaborative research, and entrepreneurial opportunities in the private sector and nonprofit world.

Kevin Gotham will discuss the basic elements and strategies of submitting proposals to the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Social Science Research Council (SSRC), and other federal agencies. He will describe the process and criteria by which federal funders like the NSF and the NEH review proposals, proposal development strategies for individual investigators, the qualities and merits of an award-winning proposal, and federal funding opportunities for researchers. Kevin is a former NSF program director, occasional NSF panelist and reviewer, and a current NSF awardee.

Chris Rodning will discuss why applying for grants is important for graduate students and how grant writing can enhance student career prospects. He will describe the strategies students can use to develop proposals, the importance of working with faculty mentors in preparing proposals, and various skills students can develop to score funding for their research. He will also provide recommendations for how students can seek out and apply for diverse sources of funding, including internal and external sources. Chris has experience reviewing grant proposals for National Geographic Society (NGS), National Science Foundation (NSF), and the American Philosophical Society. He has also been a co-P.I. on NSF and NGS grants; and a P.I. for a Board of Regents Grant.

The workshop will also include short presentations from Katherine Johnston and Patrick Rafail, assistant professors in sociology. Katie and Patrick are past winners of NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant (DDIG) awards. Patrick is a current NSF awardee. They both have much experience as grant writers and will speak about the grant review and evaluation process for graduate student proposals and offer advice and suggestions for developing an award-winning proposal.

The workshop is targeted toward all graduate students in SLA interested in pursuing external funding to complete their dissertations and enhance their professional skills. The format will be interactive, allowing for audience questions and participation. Please RSVP to Kevin Gotham kgotham@tulane.edu. Please also submit a few sentences describing your research interests or an abstract of your dissertation.

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