Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

An Evening With Two Francophone-Creolophone Authors

November 3rd, 2014
4:15 pm to 6:00 pm

Location
Tulane University, Stone Auditorium, 210 Woldenberg Art Center

From 1492 when Christopher Columbus landed on Quisqueya Island, to the period 1791-1804,which marked the emergence and manifestation of self-consciousness by African bondsmen who revolted against their subjugation by the colonial empires, the Caribbean region has not only been the theater of a power struggle among European countries but also an arena where African and European languages and cultures intersect, entice, and repel each other, producing heteroglossic speech communities that have become more or less diglossic speech communities.

Modern-day Caribbean islanders, particularly those who use Creole as their native tongue and French as their lingua franca, still deal with the language issue in different spheres of social practice as well as in literature. Such linguistic heritage is a direct manifestation of colonialism.

The manner in which francophone/creolophone Caribbean writers take up the issue of language in their writings remains a topic that endures as we think about languages in that region.

It is in this context that Mr. Anderson Dovilas and Ms. Fabienne Kanor, two francophone Caribbean authors, respectively from Haiti and Martinique/France, will help us further address this question as they discuss their works produced in Haitian Creole and in French.

Born in Orléans, France, of Martinican parents, Fabienne Kanor is an award-winning writer and the author of four novels, including Les Chiens ne font pas des chats (2008) and Anticorps (2010), as well as the children’s novel Le Jour où la mer a disparu (2008). She received the Fetkann Award for her novel D’Eaux Douces (2004), and and the RFO Literary Award for Humus (2006).

Anderson Dovilas was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, July 02, 1985. This young author has published in France, in the US, and in Canada. He has attended the State University of Haiti where he studied Linguistic and a minor in Ethnology. He is a Poet-activist, a cultural Journalist, a playwright, and an actor. Dovilas, has participated, collaborated, and organized several cultural events; and often organized street performances to rein-act the history of his battered country, to create social activities, to educate and entertain.

REFRESHMENTS WILL FOLLOW

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:
Marky Jean-Pierre
Béatrice Germaine

Sponsored by
Department of French & Italian at Tulane University
Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University
Consulate General of France in New Orleans

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