Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Marcello Canuto

Director - Middle American Research Institute, Associate Professor - Anthropology

Contact Info
mcanuto@tulane.edu

Degrees

  • A.B., Harvard University, Anthropology, 1991
  • Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, Anthropology, 2002

Academic Experience

  • Associate Professor, Tulane University, 2009-
  • Assistant Professor, Yale University, 2002-2009
  • Lecturer, Yale University, 2001-2002
  • Lecturer, University of Massachusetts, 2000-2001
  • Field Instructor, Harvard Archaeological Field School, Honduras, 1997-2000

Research & Teaching Specializations: Archaeological theory, Mesoamerican prehistory, Development of Socio-political complexity, Remote sensing analysis

Related Experience

  • Director, Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University, 2009-
  • Consultant, United Nations Development Programme, Guatemala, 2008-
  • Editorial Board, Arqueología Guatemalteca, 2008-
  • Director, La Corona Regional Archaeological Project, La Corona, Petén, Guatemala, 2007-
  • Advisory Board, Instituto Hondureño de Antropología e Historia, 2006-2009
  • Assistant Curator, Pre-Columbian Collections, Peabody Museum, 2003-2009
  • Director, Yale Archaeological Project at the Henry Whitfield House Museum, 2003-2007

Distinctions

  • National Geographic Society Grant, 2005, 2009, 2014
  • Selz Foundation Grant, 2012-2013
  • The Seaver Institute Grant, 2008-2010
  • Reed Foundation Research Grant, 2007
  • National Science Foundation Grant, 2004
  • Heinz Foundation Grant, 2004

Languages: Spanish; Italian; French; Portuguese

Selected Publications

  • 2012. "Community." With Jason Yaeger. In Oxford Handbook on Mesoamerican Archaeology. D.L. Nichols and C.A. Pool, eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • 2011. “Before the Classic in the Southeastern Area: Issues of Organizational and Ethnic Diversity in the Copan Region, western Honduras.” With R. J. Sharer and E. E. Bell. In The Southern Maya in the Late Preclassic. N Kaplan and M Love, eds. Boulder: University Press of Colorado.
  • 2009. “Proyecto Regional Arqueológico La Corona: Objetivos generales y resultados preliminares de las investigaciones en el "Sitio Q". “ With Tomas Barrientos Q. In XXII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala. Juan P. Laporte, et al., eds. Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes, Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Asociación Tikal, Fundación Arqueológica del Nuevo Mundo, Guatemala.
  • 2009. “Middle Preclassic Maya Society: Quixotic Tilting at Windmills or Giants of Civilization?” In Early Maya States. Robert J. Sharer and Loa P. Traxler, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • 2008. “The Ties that Bind: Administrative Strategies in the El Paraíso Valley, Department of Copan, Honduras.” With Ellen E. Bell. Mexicon. 30 (1): 10-20.
  • 2004. Understanding Early Classic Copan. Editor, with Ellen E. Bell and Robert J. Sharer. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

Number of Dissertations or Theses Supervised in the Past 5 Years: 19

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Upcoming Events

Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom with Américas Award Books

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Américas Award K-12 Workshop

In celebration of the 2014 Américas Award, CLASP and Teaching for Change are hosting a K-12 teacher workshop “Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom with Américas Award Books.”

This hands-on workshop will explore issues of immigration and identity using children's literature. The workshop will feature the work of this year's Honorable Mention book, Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote by Duncan Tonatiuh and Commended Title Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick your Ass by Meg Medina. Both authors will be in attendance to work with teachers on activities and strategies to best engage young readers with the complexity of immigration as it relates to family, education, and identity. Teaching for Change will highlight additional resources to incorporate teaching Social Justice and Human Rights.

All participants will receive breakfast, teaching resources, and a book (a choice of one of the two featured titles, please indicate whether you’d prefer the picture book Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote or the Young Adult title, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass). Participants are also invited to attend the Américas Award Ceremony to be held at the Library of Congress from 3:00 – 5:00 PM. Also, a month-long exhibit of the original artwork from Parrots Over Puerto Rico will be on display at the Young Readers Center in The Library of Congress.

For a workshop schedule and to access resources from the workshop, please visit the workshop website or download the agenda here

The Américas Award is sponsored by CLASP and coordinated by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University. Additional funding is provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, The Ohio State University, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and Vanderbilt University.

For more information contact Denise Woltering (dwolteri@tulane.edu) (504.865.5164)

Download the printable Flyer.

Geometry, gigantism, and lacquerware, or, the origins of social hierarchy

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The Tulane Anthropology Student Association (TASA) presents a talk by Dr. William Balée, Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University. The talk is entitled: “Geometry, gigantism, and lacquerware, or, the origins of social hierarchy.”

A reception will follow.

For more information contact TASA (tulaneasa@gmail.com)

MARI Brown Bag: Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown "Maya Boomtown Archaeology? Recent and Future Investigations at Alabama, Belize"

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Dr. Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown, a visiting scholar at MARI, will present new information about her research at the site of Alabama in southern Belize in a talk entitled “Maya Boomtown Archaeology? Recent and Future Investigations at Alabama, Belize”

M.A.R.I.‘s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

Geography is not Destiny and History need not Repeat: Don Leondard

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The first talk of the Tulane University Political Science Seminar takes place on Friday, October 3rd in Norman Mayer 125A. The speaker will be Don Leonard (CIPR Post-Doctoral Fellow) who will present a paper entitled "Geography is not Destiny and History need not Repeat: Trade Politics and State Development in Latin America."

Why are some societies more prosperous than others? Geographic endowments have been found to shape the development trajectories of nations directly, as well as indirectly through their effect on the quality of the political institutions that emerge during colonization. In these latter accounts, stability in the underlying distribution of income within a society accounts for the persistence of 'good' or 'bad' institutions by determining who has the power to shape the economic purpose of the state. In contrast, comparative historical analysis of state development on the island of Hispaniola identifies conditions under which exogenous changes in exposure to international trade can alter the development trajectories of societies by reshaping the distribution of income and power within them, as well as the preferences of the powerful over institutional purpose. These findings challenge existing theories of state development that emphasize the path-dependent effects of geography and colonial legacy.

For a draft of Dr. Leonard’s paper, please click here.

Day of the Dead and the Arts: A Workshop for K-12 Art Educators

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art are sponsoring a K-12 teacher workshop to celebrate Day of the Dead!

The workshop will focus on how to provide students with information about Day of the Dead, Day of the Dead traditions, and celebrating Day of the Dead in the classroom. The workshop will involve hands-on activities, including activities which will translate into the classroom!

All participants will receive light refreshments and teaching materials. One teacher will have the opportunity to use a Day of the Dead altar kit, provided by the Latin American Resource Center. The kit has everything you need to celebrate Day of the Dead in your classroom!

For a complete schedule and more information on the presentations visit the workshop website or download a PDF version. The website also contains a link to the pre-workshop survey which should be filled out prior to arriving at the workshop.

Chep Morrison: Reconnecting New Orleans and Latin America

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In Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month the 2nd Thursday Lecture Series at the Louisiana State Museum will present a talk entitled “Chep Morrison: Reconnecting New Orleans and Latin America” by Robert Gray Freeland

Four times mayor of New Orleans, Morrison was probably the best-known US citizen in Latin America in his day. As a Mayor interested in expanding international trade, he created a distinct Latin flavor in his efforts. As Ambassador of the Organization of American States (OAS), Morrison played an important part in the Kennedy Administration implementation of a Good Neighbor policy and the Alliance for Progress.