Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Summer K-12 Teacher Institute in Cuba

June 21st, 2014 - July 5th, 2014

Location
Havana, Cuba

Teaching Cuban Culture and Society: A Summer K-12 Teacher Institute in Cuba
Havana, Cuba | June 21 – July 5, 2014

APPLICATIONS FOR THE PROGRAM ARE AVAILABLE NOW!
Click here for instructions.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies is offering a unique summer study abroad program for K-12 teachers in Havana, Cuba in 2014. This two-week program provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans, earn academic credit while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and people that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don't miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

Those interested in applying must be a K-12 educator or librarian. There is no Spanish language requirement for this program. Please note: This program is only open to K-12 educators who are currently teaching, are pre-service teachers or are serving in a school or public library.

All participants will be enrolled in LAST 3130 (3 undergraduate credits): Society and Culture of Cuba taught by Professor Annie Gibson. The course enables all participants to explore Cuba with the guidance of an experienced Tulane faculty member while meeting Cuban artists, scholars, visiting local schools, non-profit organizations and more. At the end of the 15 day trip, participants will have classroom resources and activities to bring into their classrooms.

Program Cost:
The cost of the program is $3,900 which includes 3 Tulane credits, shared room and two meals a day at the ANAP, medical insurance, airfare to/from Havana from Tampa, FL; OFAC-licensed academic visa, and specialized tours and outings. Airfare to/from Tampa, one-night hotel stay in Tampa, incidental costs, and extra meals and expenses are not included in the program cost.

Program Application:
K-12 educators interested in applying must be currently teaching in the classroom. Spanish proficiency is NOT required for this program. Complete applications (application form, statement of purpose, two recommendation letters, copy of front page of passport, and sample lesson plan) and a $150 non-refundable deposit are due by 5:00 PM on March 28, 2014.

You will be notified of your admission to the program by April 7th.

Application can be downloaded here

For more information and an application please visit the institute website.

ITINERARY – 15 DAYS

  • Day 1 – U.S./HAVANA, CUBA
    Depart from Tampa, FL, Upon arrival, enjoy dinner and a welcome reception followed by an informal walk on the Malecón.
  • Day 2 – HAVANA
    Havana Vieja Tour with Afro-Cuban Dance in the evening.
  • Day 3 – HAVANA
    Curriculum development and lecture with Professor Alfredo Prieto on “Cuba Today.”
  • Day 4 – HAVANA
    Walking tour of Calle Obispo in the morning with Professor Rafael Hernández. Visit to after-school arts program in the afternoon.
  • Day 5 – HAVANA
    Presentation by Professor Isabel Rigol on “Current Challenges Facing Havan’s Effort to Preserve its Architecture and Heritage.” Evening walk and visit to the Cañonazo at the Morro.
  • Day 6 – VINALES
    Day excursion to explore geography of Cuba’s tobacco and sugar plantations.
  • Day 7 – ALAMAR
    Day excursion to Organiponico in Alamar to explore sustainable farming in Cuba.
  • Day 8 – HAVANA/JAIMANITAS
    Visit to Cementerio Colón, Plaza de la Revolución. Afternoon visit to workshop of ceramic artist, José Fuster. Curriculum development in the evening.
  • Day 9 – SANTA CLARA, TRINIDAD
    Travel to Trinidad via Santa Clara a town founded by 175 people on July 15, 1689. It is the site of the last battle in the Cuban Revolution in 1958. In Trinidad, we explore Cuba's best-preserved colonial city.
  • Day 10 – TRINIDAD
    We continue to explore this UNESCO World Heritage site (since 1988). It was founded on December 23, 1514 by Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar and became a central piece of Cuba’s economy with the sugar mills.
  • Day 11 – CIENFUEGOS
    We will head to Cienfuegos, a town known for its architectural beauty which reveals its French colonial roots.
  • Day 12 – HAVANA
    We will hear from Professor Olga Marta about the Children’s Youth Literacy Scene in Cuba today. In the afternoon we will visit the Instituto Superior de Artes (ISA), a school founded in 1976 as Cuba’s national school of the arts.
  • Day 13 – PLAYA GIRON (Site of Bay of Pigs)
    Day excursion to the historic site of the Bay of Pigs, one of the landing sites for the 1961 US-backed invasion.
  • Day 14 – HAVANA
    Wrap-up curriculum workshop followed by a free afternoon ending in a celebratory dinner.
  • Day 15 – HAVANA/U.S.
    Morning departure for the U.S.

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Upcoming Events

Mesa Redonda/Round Table Discussion: U.S.-Cuba Relations

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¡Viva Cuba! Now what?

The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute presents a round table discussion on the restoration of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba, and what it may mean for life on the island. Panelists include Tulane students and faculty.

PANELISTS:

  • Dr. Ana M. López, Associate Provost, Director of CCSI, Professor of Communication
  • Dr. Martin Dimitrov, Associate Professor, Political Science
  • Dr. Annie Gibson, Professor of Practice, CGS
  • Jimena Codina, M.A. Candidate, Latin American Studies
  • Boris Martin, Ph.D Candidate, History
  • Dr. Carolina Caballero (moderator), Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese

All are welcome to attend. Q & A session to follow.
Friday, January 30th
4:30pm
100A Jones Hall
Greenleaf Conference Room

MARI Brown Bag: Christopher Rodning "Joara, Cuenca, and Fort San Juan: The Northern Borderlands of La Florida, 1566-1568"

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Dr. Christopher Rodning, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, will present on his research on Spanish contact with Native North Americans in the southeastern United States.

M.A.R.I.'s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

A Presentation and Discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado

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The Payson Center for International Development and the center for Inter-American Policy and Research invite you to:
“The Political Economy of Legal Knowledge”

A presentation and discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado: Faculty of Law, University of the Andes, Bogota.

Dr. Bonilla is a constitutional law scholar and the author and editor of several books, including most recently Constitutionalism of the Global South. Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Lunch will be served. RSVP for lunch to: CIPR@tulane.edu

LAL Greenleaf Fellow Work in Progress Talk by Eugenia López Velázquez

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk by Eugenia López Velázquez, LAL Greenleaf Fellow 2014-2015.
The talk will be in Spanish. Refreshments will follow.

Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos, en una época de transición (1765-1830)/Indian, Ladino and Mulatto Towns/Communities in an Age of Transition. Se trata de un estudio dentro del territorio salvadoreño y del contexto centroamericano. Es una investigación que tiene por objeto estudiar las transformaciones ocurridas en los pueblos de indios, de mulato y de ladinos, dentro del período de transición, que va de los años de la aplicación de las reformas borbónicas de Carlos III, de la crisis monárquica e independencia, a los primeros años de vida independiente, en el período de la República Federal de Centro América. Se trata de una investigación en la que la vertiente central serán las prácticas de poder en el plano local, provincial y central para penetrar en dos realidades: en la política-administrativa y en lo socioeconómico. Dentro de esto se busca delinear las transformaciones de la vida de los pueblos, particularmente los cambios y continuidades en torno a la autonomía, los recursos, las corporaciones comunes y a la posesión de las tierras comunales y ejidales. This project focuses on the territory of El Salvador, within a Central American context. The purpose is to study transformations in Indian, Ladino and Mulatto communities during the period of transition stretching from the Bourbon Reforms of Charles III through the crisis of the monarchy and political independence, to the initial years of independent life during the period of the Federal Republic of Central America. The project centers on the practices of power in local, provincial, and central spheres with a focus on political, administrative and socio-economic factors. The goal is to trace transformations in the life of these communities, especially changes and continuities surrounding autonomy, resources, communal corporations and the possession of communal lands and ejidos. María Eugenia López Velásquez teaches history at Universidad de El Salvador in San Salvador. She holds a Licenciatura in History at Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico, and an M.A. in Modern and contemporary history from Instituto Mora in Mexico City. Her thesis on on the role of Salvadoran elites during the period of annexation to Mexico (1821-1823) was published as a monograph in 2000 by CONCULTURA. María Eugenia López has also received archival training, and from 1998 to 2005 she was Director of the National Archives of El Salvador. She is the author of numerous articles on Salvadoran history, particularly the colonial and early Independence periods; she has written as well on oral histories and archives in her country. She is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Sciences at Colegio de Michoacán in Mexico working on a dissertation on Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos en una época de transición (1765-1830).

Mobilizing at the Margins: Citizenship, Identity, and Democracy

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Tulane University's Latin American Graduate Organization invites your attendance at the 2015 Graduate Conference where you can meet graduate scholars, faculty, and community leaders interested in Latin America, explore the city, and experience the unique Mardi Gras season in New Orleans!

This year's conference encourages participants to engage with historical and emerging confrontations and reconfigurations of national identification, expressions of individual or communal identity, performances of citizenship, and re-imaginings of democracy within the context of Latin America. Latin America and the Caribbean encompass vast cultural, linguistic, and geographic diversity, making the region a subject of prolific scholarly study across disciplines. Within this complexity, conceptualizations of citizenship, identity, and democracy are constantly being negotiated, contested, and reframed in a multitude of contexts. These various encounters highlight the ways in which individuals interact with their communities, how communities define themselves within and/or beyond the framework of national borders, and how power and politics play out in an increasingly interconnected and decentralized global community.

Our keynote speaker this year will be Dr. Lara Putnam. Lara Putnam is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research has explored labor migration; state racism; and the ways kinship, gender, and sexuality both shape and are shaped by large-scale political and economic shifts. Publications include Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age (UNC Press, 2013), The Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 (UNC Press, 2002), and recent articles in Modernism/Modernities, International Labor and Working-Class History, the Journal of British Studies, and Small Axe. Work in progress uses examples from the history of Venezuela, Trinidad, and Grenada to explore methodological and theoretical dilemmas within history's transnational and digital "turns."

Photographic Exhibit: "Mexico, World Heritage Cities"

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to present the photographic exhibit “Mexico, World Heritage Cities” from January 22 to February 15, 2015. An opening reception will be held on January 22nd at 6 PM.

To date 721 sites worldwide have been listed as World Heritage sites including 167 cities. Of these cities, 10 of them are located in Mexico. The cities were chosen due to their historic, architectural, and urban importance. They include Campeche, Guanajuato, Morelia, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, San Miguel, Zacatecas, and Mexico City.