Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Teatro cubano: Discursos emergentes (A talk on contemporary Cuban theater by Yohayna Hernández González)

November 22nd, 2013

Newcomb Hall 407

Yohayna Hernández González (1983, Havana, Cuba) is assistant professor of History of Cuban Theater at the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana, Cuba. She is chief editor of Tablas, a journal on the performing arts in Cuba, and editor at the publisher Tablas-Alarcos. Yohayna is also coordinator of the Tubo de ensayo project, a creative space for young theater practitioners on the island, as well as “Laboratorio Ibsen: las herramientas de la sociedad,” a community project sponsored by the Department of Culture in Norway. In her spare time, she also advises for Cubavisión International, ICRT, Cuba.

Beyond her numerous presentations, Yohayna regularly contributes to Tablas and other island publications such as La Jiribilla, Dédalo, and Juventud Rebelde. She has also edited various anthologies, and national and international bulletins on Cuban theater and the performing arts.

All are welcome to attend. Yohayna’s talk is given in Spanish. Sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute.





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Upcoming Events

Vodú Chic: Cuba's Haitian Heritage, the Folkloric Imaginary, and the State

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The Department of Anthropology and Tulane Anthropology Student Association present a lecture by Dr. Grete Viddal, Zemurray-Stone Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, “Vodú Chic: Cuba’s Haitian Heritage, the Folkloric Imaginary, and the State” at 4:00 pm on Friday October 21st.

Talk Abstract
Hundreds of thousands of Haitian agricultural laborers arrived in Cuba to cut cane as the Cuban sugar industry was expanding between the 1910s and the 1930s. Historically, Haitian laborers occupied the lowest strata in Cuban society. Until recently, the maintenance of Haitian traditions in Cuba was associated with rural isolation and poverty. Today however, Cuba’s Haitian communities are increasingly linked with cultural institutes, heritage festivals, music promoters, and the tourism industry. Music, dance, and rituals of Vodú are reimagined for the public stage. Viddal’s book in progress, Vodú Chic, explores how haitiano-cubanos utilize emerging “economies of folklore” in the socialist state —particularly heritage conservation projects and the tourist industry—to assert their voices and transform once-denigrated traditions into the exotic and desired.

A brief reception will follow the talk.

MARI Brown Bag: Patricia Alexander Lagarde "Contagious Chavin: How Restricted Access and a Hidden Image Inspired the Rise of the Chavin Horizon"

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Patricia Alexander Lagarde, a Ph.D. student in the joint Latin American Studies and Art History program at Tulane University, will present a talk “Contagious Chavin: How Restricted Access and a Hidden Image Inspired the Rise of the Chavin Horizon” on her research about the Chavin art style in Peru.

For more information and a full list of Brown Bag talks, visit the Brown Bag Website.

Honduran Environmental Rights Activist Speaks on Behalf of Her Mother Berta Cáceres

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Environmental Studies program, Tulane’s Office of Multicultural Affairs the Newcomb College Institute and the local organization, Amigos de Nuestra América are pleased to present a lecture by Olivia Marcela Zúñiga Cáceres, the daughter of Berta Cáceres the Honduran environmental activist assassinated in 2014. Zúñiga Cáceres will discuss her mother’s legacy and plans to continue work on environmental issues in Honduras particularly among indigenous people.

In a country with growing socioeconomic inequality and human rights violations, Cáceres rallied the indigenous Lenca people of Honduras and waged a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam. Cáceres grew up during the violence that swept through Central America in the 1980s. In 1993 she confounded the National Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) to address the growing threats posed to Lenca communities by illegal logging, fight for their territorial rights and improve their livelihoods. Death threats to Cáceres continued until March 3, 2016 when she was killed by gunmen in her home. Her death sparked international outrage. Dutch development bank FMO and FinnFund have since suspended their involvement in the Agua Zarca project.

Free and open to the public. Presentation will be in Spanish with interpretation in English provided. For more information, please visit or call 504.865.5164.

Tulane Art History Works-in-Progress Colloquium

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Presenting an art history works-in-progress colloquium where two of the department’s Ph.D. students will be giving dry runs of upcoming conference talks.

  • Julia O’Keefe, Ph.D candidate in Art History and Latin American Studies will be outlining her talk- Manifesting the Sacred: Aztec Stone Boxes as Landscapes of Exchange
  • Jennifer Saracino, Ph.D candidate in Art History and Latin American studies will be outlining her talk- The Glyphic Landscape: Place Glyphs as Indicators of Changing Environmental Perceptions in the Mapu Uppsala.

Bate Papo! Speak Portuguese

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Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats. It’s Happy Hour em português! Start off your weekend conversando! This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. For more information, please contact Jessica Glass at

Stone Center Undergraduate Showcase/Open House

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As a part of Tulane Homecoming and family weekend 2016. Explore the programs and activities offered through Tulane’s renowned Stone Center for Latin American Studies, including international and local service-learning, summer and semester abroad programs at Tulane’s Costa Rica campus and beyond and students’ post-Tulane careers. This event is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.
For more information, please contact Edie Wolfe, or call 504.865.5164.