Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Summer Field Research Grant Symposium

November 2nd, 2013
8:00am-5:00pm

Location
Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Room 100A Jones Hall (Greenleaf)
Tulane University

Please join us for the annual Graduate Student Summer Field Research Symposium. Every fall semester, Graduate Students who received a previous summer field research grant through the Stone Center present their summer field research experiences in a day long symposium.

Symposium Schedule:

Breakfast: 8:00 – 8:30 am

Panel A 8:30 – 10:00 am

  • “Comprehensive Visual Analysis of Sculptural Representations of Tlaloc, the Aztec Rain God” Shannen Winfield
  • “Political Culture of Protest and Mobilization in Contemporary Mexico City” Diana Soto
  • “An Archaeological Examination of an Ancient Maya Community at Escalera al Cielo, Yucatan, Mexico” Evan Parker
  • “Ideology of Containment in Aztec Culture” Julia O’Keefe

Panel B 10:15 – 11:45 am

  • “Haitian Broadcast Media’s Role in Haiti’s Reconstruction” Shearon Roberts
  • “Contesting Decentralization: Agricultural Production, Peasant Movements and International Development in Haiti” Matthew Olson
  • “Nation and Diaspora: Identity and Community Politics in the Fiction of Earl Lovelace” Cherif Saloum Diatta
  • “Markets in the Time of Cholera” Kyrstin Mallon Andrews

Panel C 12:00 – 1:30 pm

  • “La configuración periodística del bandido en Cuba: batallas impresas (1878-1898)” Xose Pereira Boan
  • “Estimating Physiological Consequences of Roosting Densities in the Austral Migrant Fork-Tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus Savana)” Maggie MacPherson
  • “The Rainbow Connection: The Unlikely Alliance between Chile’s Mapuche and LGBT Movements” Baird Campbell
  • “Reworking Notions of Citizenship and Culture: Post Katrina Migrant Workers and their Return to Honduras” Sarah Fouts

Panel D 1:45 – 3:15 pm

  • “Female Inmates’ Access to Healthcare in Fortaleza, Brazil: A Qualitative Study” Venessa Vosteen
  • “Assessment of the Health Referral System in Bolivia: A Qualitative Approach” Alejandra Leyton
  • “How Does Fruit Abundance Influence Seed Dispersal and Predation by Vertebrates in the Choco Forests of Ecuador?” Luke Browne

Panel E 3:30 – 5:00 pm

  • “Identifying Factors Mediating the Survival of Panamanian Atelopus Populations” Matthew James Robak
  • “Cultural Heritage Revitalization and Development in Panama City’s Historic District, Casco Antiguo” Maille Faughnan
  • “Dengue Symptom Thresholds (Duration and Intensity) in Patient Seeking Behavior in Iquitos, Peru” Keith Esch

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Upcoming Events

Noon-Time Talk on Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898 with Lucia Abramovic

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Join Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's curatorial fellow for Spanish colonial art for a Noontime Talk on the exhibition Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Noontime Talks are brief, informative discussions on exhibitions and installations in NOMA's galleries. Wednesdays are free admission days for Louisiana residents. Please visit the NOMA website for more information.

MARI Brown Bag: Marcello Canuto, "The Tombs of La Corona: La Noblesse Oblige"

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Marcello Canuto, Director of the Middle American Research Institute at Tulane University, will present about his recent investigations at La Corona. The talk will focus on tombs discovered during the 2014 field season and the information these tombs provides about the broader socio-political relationships at La Corona.

M.A.R.I.'s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

Mining, Privilege, and Artistic Production in the Colonial Andes: Short Film and Roundtable Discussion

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This program includes a screening of Harun Farocki's film The Silver and the Cross (20 min), which examines a 1758 painting by Gaspar Miguel de Berrío that depicts the city and the surrounding silver mines of Potosí, Bolivia. A roundtable discussion featuring three local scholars of Colonial Latin America will follow the film. The discussion will employ the film's description of colonial Potosí as an anchor for a broader discussion about colonial Andean economics, history, and art, particularly as it relates to Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

The goal of this event is to better understand the mechanisms that created the level of wealth exhibited in Behind Closed Doors, and to shed light on an often overlooked city that was essential to the economic success of Spanish America for hundreds of years.

The roundtable discussants are Dr. Kris Lane, the France V. Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History, Department of History, Tulane University; Dr. John Charles, Associate Professor of Colonial Spanish American Literature and Director of Graduate Studies, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University; and Dr. Ari Zighelboim, Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University. Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's Curatorial Fellow for Spanish Colonial Art, will moderate the discussion.

About Dr. Kris Lane
Kris Lane holds the France V. Scholes Chair in Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University. His books include Quito 1599: City & Colony in Transition, Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires, and Pillaging the Empire: Piracy in the Americas, 1500-1750. He is currently writing a history of the great Potosí mint scandal of 1649, along with an annotated translation of early writings on Potosí.

About Dr. John Charles
John Charles is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University. He is the author of numerous articles on colonial Andean literature and history, and the book Allies at Odds: The Andean Church and Its Indigenous Agents, 1583-1671 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010).

About Dr. Ari Zighelboim
Ari Zighelboim (Lima, 1960) studied in Peru, Israel and the United States, graduating with a Bachelor's degree in history and East Asian studies, an MA in cultural anthropology and a PhD in Spanish and Latin American literature. His masters paper dealt with scenes of human sacrifice on mountains in Moche iconography, and his PhD thesis with the surviving Inca nobility during the colonial period in Peru and its cultural and social strategies. He has written about Ruben Dario, Juan de Espinosa Medrano, the drama in Quechua Ollantay, Potosí and other topics. He has also published a volume of poetry. He is now senior lecturer in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane university.

Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World

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Assistant Professor Mia Bagneris will lecture on "Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World," on Friday, September 12 at 6pm at the New Orleans Museum of Art. The lecture will be held in conjunction with the exhibit, Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Professor Bagneris teaches African American/Diaspora art history and studies of race in Western Art. Her own work concentrates on the construction of race in British and American art and visual culture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Performance by Afro-Cuban band Sintesis

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The Cuban and Caribbean Institute presents: Sintesis

Afro-Cuban group Sintesis, founded in 1974 by Carlos Alfonso Valdes, is one of Cuba's musical emblems. The contemporary band has elements of ethno-fusion rhythms mixed with a core of jazz and rock and roll. In the 1980's, Sintesis grew in popularity, and by mid-late decade, the band was a staple of world music festivals. In 1989, they released their first album "Ancestros," and since then have released many more. Their album "Habana a Flor de Piel" was nominated for a Latin Grammy Award in the category of Best Contemporary Tropical Album in 2002.

All are welcome to attend.

Guantánamo Post-9/11: Human Rights & Constitutional Law in Modern America

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Guantánamo Post-9/11: Human Rights & Constitutional Law in Modern America

Guest speakers:
Jess Bravin: Wall Street Journal, author of Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantánamo Bay
Denny Leboeuf: ACLU, Tulane JD
Chaplain James Yee: Former U.S. Army Chaplain, author of For God and Country: Faith and Patriotism Under Fire

The Guantánamo Public Memory Project is a traveling exhibit that examines the history of the U.S. naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, from multiple perspectives and raises questions about U.S.-Cuban relations, civil liberties, national security, and public memory in the past, present, and future. The guest speakers will be giving a talk on the titled event. All are welcome to attend.

For more information about the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, visit http://gitmomemory.org.