Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Tulane Maya Symposium Teacher Workshop: On the Maya Trail: Ancient Travelers, Epic Voyages

March 20th, 2014 - March 21st, 2014

Location
Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, New Orleans, LA

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Middle American Research Institute, and the Audubon Aquarium are joining together to sponsor a K-12 teacher workshop in conjunction with the 11th annual Tulane Maya Symposium. This year the workshop will be held at the Audubon Aquarium in New Orleans, in celebration of the opening of a new exhibit on reefs in the Maya area. The workshop will focus on the symposium theme: traveling and voyages among the Maya. The workshop will integrate information about the geography and environment of the Maya area and the ancient and modern Maya utilization of environmental resources. The resources discussed will provide a great way for teachers working with the Common Core requirements to integrate information about the Maya into discussions of a variety of topics!

This year the teacher workshop will begin on Thursday evening, March 20th, with a special reception and talk at the Aquarium specifically for teachers. The main component of the workshop will take place on Friday, March 21st. For more information and to register, please visit the symposium website.

Event Schedule: (For a downloadable schedule click here)

Thursday (Audubon Aquarium)
6:00 – 8:00 PM
Opening reception

6:00 – 6:30 PM
Introduction and Opening Remarks

6:30 – 7:00 PM
What do we really know about the Ancient Maya?Marcello Canuto, Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University

Friday (Audubon Aquarium)
9:00 – 9:50 AM
Introduction to the Geography/Environment of the Maya – Kristine Grzenda, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas

10:00- 10:50 AM
Historical Perspectives on the Maya – Valerie Feathers, Louisiana State University

11:00- 11:50 AM
Introduction to Maya Sea TradersHeather McKillop, Louisiana State University

12:00 – 1:00 PM
Lunch

1:00 – 1:50 PM
Integrating the Standards to Create Engaging Curricula on the MayaDenise Woltering Vargas and Tricia LeBlanc

2:00 PM
Conclusion and Evaluation

6:00 – 7:15 PM (NOMA)
KeynoteKarl Taube, University of California Riverside

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Upcoming Events

LAL Greenleaf Fellow Work in Progress Talk by Eugenia López Velázquez

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk by Eugenia López Velázquez, LAL Greenleaf Fellow 2014-2015.
The talk will be in Spanish. Refreshments will follow.

Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos, en una época de transición (1765-1830)/Indian, Ladino and Mulatto Towns/Communities in an Age of Transition.

Talk abstract:
Se trata de un estudio dentro del territorio salvadoreño y del contexto centroamericano. Es una investigación que tiene por objeto estudiar las transformaciones ocurridas en los pueblos de indios, de mulato y de ladinos, dentro del período de transición, que va de los años de la aplicación de las reformas borbónicas de Carlos III, de la crisis monárquica e independencia, a los primeros años de vida independiente, en el período de la República Federal de Centro América. Se trata de una investigación en la que la vertiente central serán las prácticas de poder en el plano local, provincial y central para penetrar en dos realidades: en la política-administrativa y en lo socioeconómico. Dentro de esto se busca delinear las transformaciones de la vida de los pueblos, particularmente los cambios y continuidades en torno a la autonomía, los recursos, las corporaciones comunes y a la posesión de las tierras comunales y ejidales.

This project focuses on the territory of El Salvador, within a Central American context. The purpose is to study transformations in Indian, Ladino and Mulatto communities during the period of transition stretching from the Bourbon Reforms of Charles III through the crisis of the monarchy and political independence, to the initial years of independent life during the period of the Federal Republic of Central America. The project centers on the practices of power in local, provincial, and central spheres with a focus on political, administrative and socio-economic factors. The goal is to trace transformations in the life of these communities, especially changes and continuities surrounding autonomy, resources, communal corporations and the possession of communal lands and ejidos.

María Eugenia López Velásquez teaches history at Universidad de El Salvador in San Salvador. She holds a Licenciatura in History at Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico, and an M.A. in Modern and contemporary history from Instituto Mora in Mexico City. Her thesis on on the role of Salvadoran elites during the period of annexation to Mexico (1821-1823) was published as a monograph in 2000 by CONCULTURA. María Eugenia López has also received archival training, and from 1998 to 2005 she was Director of the National Archives of El Salvador. She is the author of numerous articles on Salvadoran history, particularly the colonial and early Independence periods; she has written as well on oral histories and archives in her country. She is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Sciences at Colegio de Michoacán in Mexico working on a dissertation on Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos en una época de transición (1765-1830).

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Workers in the United States

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Dr. Seth M. Holmes, Martin Sisters Assistant Professor, Health and Social Behavior at the University of California, Berkeley, will present a paper at the University of New Orleans entitled “Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Workers in the United States.” Based on five years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), this talk explores how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care.

Dr. Seth M. Holmes is a cultural anthropologist and physician whose work focuses broadly on social hierarchies, health inequalities, and the ways in which such inequalities are naturalized and normalized in society and in health care. His book under the same title won the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology, the Society for the Anthropology of Work Book Award, the Association for Humanist Sociology Book Award and the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology. Holmes is Martin Sisters Endowed Chair Assistant Professor in the UC Berkeley School of Public Health and the Graduate Program in Medical Anthropology. He is Co-Director of the MD/PhD Track in Medical Anthropology coordinated between UCSF and UC Berkeley and Founding Director of the Berkeley Center for Social Medicine. He also sees patients at the public hospital in Oakland, California.

For more information please contact Steve Striffler (504-280-3305).

Contesting Trade in Central America: Market Reform and Resistance

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Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Rose J. Spalding, Professor of Political Science, DePaul University. Dr. Spalding will present her recent book Contesting Trade in Central America: Market Reform and Resistance (University of Texas, 2014). Contesting Trade analyzes the debate over the 2004 adoption of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) by the United States, five Central American countries, and the Dominican Republic. The book focuses on the region's decision and the resistance it generated from social movements, and draws on nearly two hundred interviews with representatives from government, business, civil society, and social movements to analyze the relationship between the advance of free market reform in Central America and the parallel rise of resistance movements.

Rose J. Spalding received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has been at DePaul University since 1980, where she is Professor of Political Science, a department she chaired from 2000-2003. Her previous books include Capitalism and Revolution in Nicaragua and The Political Economy of Revolutionary Nicaragua, in addition to numerous book chapters and scholarly articles. Her current research focuses on mining conflicts in Central America.

RSVP is required. Please RSVP by email to <cipr@tulane.edu>. This event is sponsored by the Center for Inter-American Policy. For more information please call 504.862.3141.

MARI Brown Bag: "Victims of the Teotihuacan Entrada in Early Classic Peten" - A Talk by Jordan Andrea Krummel

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Jordan Andrea Krummel, Project El Mirador, will present on her recent research in a talk titled:
“Victims of the Teotihuacan Entrada in Early Classic Peten: Preliminary Investigations of the Tigre Massacre.”

Friday, February 27 at 12:00 PM
Room 305, Dinwiddie Hall

See you on Friday and remember to bring your lunch!

20th Annual Environmental Summit on Law and Policy

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This event is sponsored by the Tulane Law School..

“New Orleans, LA February 27-28, 2015. The Tulane University Law School extends a welcome to its 20th Annual Summit on Environmental Law & Policy. This event will feature three keynote speakers and 16 panels of experts from around the country and the world who will be discussing a wide-range of environmental and energy topics. All events are free and open to the public, although there will be a fee for those attorneys seeking CLE credit.”

“This year's themes are: Energy, Water, Wildlife, and Beyond. KEYNOTERS include: Lt. General Russel Honoré, hailed as the "Category 5 General" for his leadership of the Hurricane Katrina Task Force and leader of the Green Army Movement; Pat Mulroy, former Las Vegas "Water Czar," now Senior Fellow at Nevada – Las Vegas and an expert on western drought; and Antonio A. Oposa Jr., President of the Philippine Law of Nature Foundation, who has pioneered groundbreaking cases in Philippine and international law.”

“The Summit will feature 16 panels, each CLE-accredited but designed to be accessible to the general public as well. Students, faculty, businesses, law firms, public interest organizations and all others are welcome to join us in discussions on issues such as climate change litigation, wind and solar power initiatives, environmental justice, and endangered species protection. Breakfast and lunch will be provided as well as evening receptions.

For more information please contact:
Emily Prince
404.663.3036
eprince@tulane.edu

For a detailed schedule of the Summit's events and online registration, please click here
or visit: www.tulaneenvironmentallawsummit.com.

A Lecture by Dr. Carmen Diana Deere: "Gender, Asset Accumulation and Wealth in Ecuador."

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A lecture by Dr. Carmen Diana Deere, Distinguished Professor of Latin American Studies and Food & Resource Economics at the University of Florida,
Gender, Asset Accumulation and Wealth in Ecuador: Implications for Women’s Bargaining Power

The Department of Economics, the Center for Inter-American Policy (CIPR), and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies invite you to a talk by Dr. Carmen Diana Deere.

Based on her path-breaking research in Ecuador, Professor Deere will discuss her findings on the association between women's share of wealth and lower incidence of domestic violence and greater egalitarian household decision-making.

Dr. Diana Deere Bio:
Dr. Carmen Diana Deereis Distinguished Professor of Latin American Studies and Food & Resource Economics at the University of Florida. She holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a M.A. in Development Studies from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Deere was Director of the UF Center for Latin American Studies from 2004 to 2009, and previously was Director of the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she was Professor of Economics. She is a Past President of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) and of the New England Council of Latin American Studies (NECLAS). Deere is the co-author of Empowering Women: Land and Property Rights in Latin America (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001), winner of LASA's Bryce Wood Book Award, as well as several other books. Among her co-edited volumes are two special issues of Feminist Economics, on Women and the Distribution of Wealth (2006) and on Gender and International Migration (2012). During 2009-2010 she was a Visiting Scholar at FLACSO-Ecuador, directing the UF-FLACSO study on Gender, Poverty and Assets, which included a 3,000 household survey on asset ownership in rural and urban areas. This project is part of a broader comparative study on the gender asset and wealth gaps which includes Ghana and India, a study initially funded by the Dutch Foreign Ministry's MDG3 Fund and currently by UNWomen. Deere's current research is on how gender inequality in asset ownership affects household outcomes such as decision-making and intimate partner violence. She is also conducting research on the factors that shape women's ability to accumulate assets, including property regimes and the role of remittances, savings and access to credit.

The talk is free and open to the public.

For more information see the flyer below or contact Samantha Greenspun, sgreens@tulane.edu