Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Americas Society/Council of the Americas releases fact sheet on immigration

September 4th, 2013

Five Reasons Why Immigrants are Critical for Our Agricultural Sector

1. With agricultural employers continuously in search of more employees, immigrant workers fill the jobs that the industry desperately needs to remain competitive.

  • Seventy-one percent of crop workers surveyed between 2007 and 2009 were foreign born.1
  • In North Carolina, only seven U.S.-born workers-less than 3 percent of those hired-completed the growing season in 2011, despite an 11 percent unemployment rate in the state. Mexican workers accounted for 90 percent of workers who completed the season.2

2. A reduced agricultural labor force leads to production losses that impact not just that industry but the U.S. economy overall.

  • Expansion of the H-2A temporary agricultural worker program-as envisioned in the Senate immigration bill passed in July-could result in a 3.4 percent increase in fruit exports and a 5.4 percent increase in vegetable exports.3
  • An expansion of the H-2A program would add $6.6 billion to U.S. GDP and $3.3 billion to personal income by 2017.4
  • Without comprehensive immigration reform, a shrinking agricultural labor force will lead to $5 to $9 billion in production losses every year.5
  • In 2011, after passage of HB 87, a law that restricted immigrant job opportunities in Georgia, the state suffered an estimated $300 million loss in harvested crops and a $1 billion hit to the overall economy.6

3. Immigrant farm laborers create jobs for U.S.-born individuals in areas of the economy beyond agriculture.

  • In 2012, every three to five H-2A farm workers in North Carolina created one job for a U.S.-born worker.7
  • An expansion of the H-2A visa program under the Senate-passed immigration reform bill would add over 51,000 jobs in the United States.8

4. With a growing population, immigrant labor is vital to helping the agriculture industry produce the food required to feed Americans.

  • By 2050, 9.6 billion people will be living on our planet, with over 400 million people living in the United States, making it the fourth most populous country in the world.9 Having a fully-staffed agricultural labor force is vital for the United States to be able to produce the food it will need.
  • Immigrants will be critical to filling future labor gaps in the economy overall and in agriculture, with 76 million baby boomers retiring and only 46 million U.S.-born workers entering the workforce by 2030.10
  • A survey in California-the number one state in cash farm receipts-found that 71 percent of farmers who grow labor-intensive crops (trees, fruits, vegetables, table grapes, raisins, and berries) reported employee shortages in 2011.11 This has forced them to change crops, to start using mechanized farming (which cannot be used with fruits and vegetables that bruise easily), or to lose part of their crop.12

5. Immigrant agricultural workers help boost the population in rural areas that may be experiencing an outflow of local residents, creating a future pipeline of workers for the industry.

  • New AS/COA–Partnership for a New American Economy research finds that for every 1,000 immigrants settling in a county, 250 U.S.-born individuals follow, drawn by increased economic opportunity.13
  • The population in non-metropolitan counties as a whole declined for the first time between April 2010 and July 2012.14
  • From 2007 to 2011, there was an average of 2.1 million foreign-born individuals living in areas where agriculture is the main industry.15

This fact sheet is a product of the AS/COA Immigration and Integration Initiative, which advances the integration of immigrants and promotes positive dialogue around the economic contributions of immigrants and Latinos overall across the United States, and was produced by Leani García and AS/COA Director of Policy Jason Marczak. For more information, visit AS/COA Online at: www.as-coa.org. For media inquiries or to speak with an expert on this topic, please contact Adriana La Rotta in our communications office at alarotta@as-coa.org.

[1] U.S. Department of Agriculture, "Immigration and the Rural Workforce," Economic Research Service, 2013.
[2] Michael A. Clemens, "International Harvest: A Case Study of How Foreign Workers Help American Farms Grow Crops-and the Economy," Partnership for a New American Economy and the Center for Global Development, 2013, pp.9-11.
[3] "Fixing Our Broken Immigration System: The Economic Benefits to Agriculture and Rural Communities," The Executive Office of the President, 2013, p.8.
[4] Frederick R. Treyz, Corey Stottlemyer and Rod Motamedi, "Key Components of Immigration Reform: An Analysis of the Economic Effects of Creating a Pathway to Legal Status, Expanding High-Skilled Visas, & Reforming Lesser-Skilled Visas," Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI), 2013. pp. 16-17.
[5] "AFBF Board Establishes Strategic Action Plan for 2013," American Farm Bureau Federation, 2013.
[6] Tom Baxter, "How Georgia's Anti-Immigration Law Could Hurt the State's (and the Nation's) Economy," Center for American Progress, 2011, p.2.
[7] Michael A. Clemens, "International Harvest: A Case Study of How Foreign Workers Help American Farms Grow Crops-and the Economy," Partnership for a New American Economy and the Center for Global Development, 2013, p.2.
[8] Frederick R. Treyz, Corey Stottlemyer and Rod Motamedi, "Key Components of Immigration Reform: An Analysis of the Economic Effects of Creating a Pathway to Legal Status, Expanding High-Skilled Visas, & Reforming Lesser-Skilled Visas," Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI), 2013. p.16.
[9] Department of Economic and Social Affairs "World Population Prospects the 2011 Revision: Highlights and Advance Tables," United Nations, 2013, pp. xv, 3, 62.
[10] The Partnership for a New American Economy and The Partnership for New York City, "Not Coming to America: Why the U.S. is Falling Behind in the Global Race for Talent," 2012, p.2.
[11] California Department of Food and Agriculture, "California Agricultural Production Statstics," 2012.
[12] California Farm Bureau Federation, "Walking the Tightrope: California Farmers Struggle with employee Shortages. California Farm Bureau Federation Agricultural Employment Survey Results-2012," p.2.
[13] Americas Society/Council of the Americas and Partnership for a New American Economy, "Immigrants Boost U.S. Economic Vitality through the Housing Market," 2013.
[14] United States Department of Agriculture, "Population & Migration," Economic Research Service.
[15] U.S. Department of Agriculture, "Immigration and the Rural Workforce," Economic Research Service, 2013.

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"Citizens" Art Exhibit

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to partner with the satellite program P.3+ of the biennial Prospect New Orleans to present an exhibition by Mexican Artist Tony Makhlouf entitled "Citizens." The exhibit will run from from November 6th to November 30th, 2014 at the Art Gallery of the Consulate- 901 Convention Center Blvd. Suite 118, New Orleans, LA 70130.

An opening reception will be held November 6th, 2014 at 6:00pm.

Tony Makhlouf is a Mexican artist with a long, and ongoing, artistic history, full of achievements and great national and international recognition. Tony also teaches production of printmaking workshops and Fine Arts at various universities in Morelos. He currently lives, teaches and works in Morelos, Mexico. "Citizens" is a compilation of Tony Makhlouf's artwork through several years.

For more information visit the Culture Blog of the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans

The Barking Mouse: A Cuban Folktale on Learning Languages

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The Pebbles Center at the Algiers Regional Public Library, and the Latin American Resource Center- at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies present “The Barking Mouse: Lessons from a Mouse Family in Speaking Other Languages; Hands-on story time with author, Antonio Sacre.” The event is for children ages 6-12, their families, and teachers.

Antonio Sacre will present his story, The Barking Mouse, which encourages bilingual education and tolerance of other peoples and cultures. In addition to the storytelling, puppet making, food, and other activities will also take place!

Antonio Sacre is the author of My Name is Cool, A Mango in the Hand, La Noche Buena: A Christmas Story, and The Barking Mouse. Sacre, born in Boston to a Cuban father and Irish-American mother, is an internationally touring bilingual storyteller, author, and solo performance artist, based in Los Angeles. Called "a charismatic, empathetic presence" by Chicago Tribune, his stories have appeared in numerous magazines, journals, and on National Public Radio. His first picture book, The Barking Mouse, published by Albert Whitman and Company in 2003, was a winner of the 2004 International Reading Association Notable Books for a Global Society. His next two picture books, La Noche Buena, a Christmas Story, and A Mango in the Hand, a Story of Proverbs were published by Abrams Books for Young Readers. Both were chosen for inclusion in the prestigious California Readers Book Collections for School Libraries in 2011 and 2012.

Event will include food, storytelling, puppet making and more!

Free and open to the public.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT DWOLTERI@TULANE.EDU OR CALL 504-862-3143.

"Where the River Bends" Photographic Exhibit

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to partner with the PhotoNOLA Festival 2014 presenting the photographic exhibition by artist Scott Dalton "Where The River Bends" from December 3rd to December 30th, 2014

Opening reception December 3rd, 2014 at 6:00pm

Scott Dalton is an editorial and corporate photographer living in Houston, Texas. He was based for 14 years throughout Latin America, mainly in Bogotá, Colombia, where he photographed the civil conflict and drug war before returning to his home state of Texas. He now photographs both editorial and corporate assignments while spending his free time working on long-term personal projects. Currently he is working along the troubled border region near Ciudad Juárez, Mexico as well as projects throughout the American South. His photography has appeared in the New York Times, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal, National Geographic, Harper’s, Time, Newsweek, the Washington Post Magazine, Condé Nast Portfolio, Business Week, and The New Yorker, among other outlets. His documentary film, LA SIERRA, won numerous awards and has been broadcast by PBS, BBC, HBO Latino, and many other international broadcasters.

Congreso internacional de literatura y cultura centroamericanas (CILCA XXIII)

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Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, y Purdue University Calumet tienen el gusto de invitar al CONGRESO DE LITERATURA y CULTURA CENTROAMERICANAS (CILCA XXIII) que se llevará a cabo en la ciudad de New Orleans, Louisiana, del 11 al 13 de marzo del 2015 en el campus de Tulane University y Loyola University New Orleans.

Desde el primer congreso realizado en Nicaragua 1993, CILCA se ha caracterizado por ser un espacio de intercambio intelectual y de amistad para académicas/os, escritoras/es y lectoras/es. El congreso se ha efectuado en todos los países centroamericanos y por primera vez en su historia, CILCA se realizará en los Estados Unidos. La ciudad escogida es Nueva Orleáns, puerta de entrada hacia el Caribe y los países de América Central. El intercambio cultural entre Nueva Orleáns y América Central ha sido intenso por muchísimos años, y la ciudad alberga una de las comunidades de origen hondureño más grandes de los Estados Unidos. Tulane University tiene estrechos lazos con la región a través del Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, y the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola University New Orleans se ha distinguido por el trabajo con las comunidades hispanas que realizan varias de sus unidades académicas, incluyendo the Law School y el Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

La organización de CILCA XXIII la realizan la Dra. Maureen Shea y el Dr. Uriel Quesada, expertos en literatura y cultura centroamericanas, con el apoyo del Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creador y promotor de CILCA.

Ud. puede ver La convocatoria aquí

Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, and Purdue University Calumet invite you to the Congress on Literature and Culture of Central America (CILCA XXIII) which will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana March 11-13 2015 on the campuses of Tulane and Loyola New Orleans.

From the first conference, held in Nicaragua in 1993, CILCA has been a space for intellectual exchange and friendship for academics and writers. The conference has been held in all of the Central American countries and for the first time in its history will be held in the United States. New Orleans, the gateway to the Caribbean and Central America, has been chosen as the location. New Orleans and Central America have a longstanding cultural exchange and New Orleans has one of the largest Honduran communities in the United States. Tulane has long connections with the region through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, and the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola New Orleans works closely with hispanic communities particularly through the Law school and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

CILCA XXIII is organized by Drs. Maureen Shea and Uriel Quesada, experts on the literature and culture of Central America, with the support of Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creator of CILCA.

The Call for Papers is available here

Registration prices are listed below:

Early Registration (BEFORE January 15, 2015):

  • $150.00 U.S. academics
  • $125.00 U.S. Latin American academics traveling from Latin America; graduate students in the U.S.
  • $100.00 Latin American graduate students traveling from Latin America

Late registration (AFTER January 15, 2015):

  • $165.00 U.S. academics
  • $140.00 Latin American academics traveling from Latin America; graduate students in the U.S.
  • $115.00 Latin American graduate students traveling from Latin America

2015 Maya Symposium Teacher Workshop

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, in collaboration with the Middle American Research Institute will present a teacher workshop in conjunction with the 12th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, “Royal Chambers Unsealed: Tombs of the Classic Maya.”

The workshop, for K-12 educators, will include basic information on the ancient Maya, discussions of how to integrate information about the Maya into the classroom, and information on ancient Maya funerary practices, the theme of the workshop.

More details on the workshop schedule will follow shortly.

To register for the workshop, please visit the symposium page

12th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium: Royal Chambers Unsealed: Tombs of the Classic Maya

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The Middle American Research Institute and Far Horizons are proud to present the Twelfth Annual Tulane Maya Symposium and Workshop. This year's symposium, titled "Royal Chambers Unsealed: Tombs of the Classic Maya", will explore the significance the ancient Classic Maya placed on the death of their divine rulers, as well as the meaning they invested in their funerary architecture, building decoration, grave goods, burial texts, and mortuary rituals.

This year’s Keynote, hosted at the New Orleans Museum of Art, will be given by Dr. William Fash of Harvard University who will guide us through the rich and impenetrable funerary world of the Classic Maya. The talks, to be held on Saturday March 21st, will discuss tombs and funerary texts from across the Maya area, including examples from Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and Mexico. The speakers are an equally diverse group, with speakers from Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, Mexico, Spain, and the United States.

To learn more about the program, visit the symposim website.

To register please visit the registration page.

For more information, contact MARI