Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Carmelo Mesa Lago discusses Pension Reform in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile

April 9th, 2013

On March 19, 2013, Tulane University's Center for Inter-American Policy welcomed back former Greenleaf professor Carmelo Mesa-Lago for a lecture entitled "Re-reforms of Privatized Pensions in Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, and Chile." Mesa opened by explaining how eleven Latin American countries conducted structural reforms of their public pension systems during the 1980s and 1990s through either complete or partial privatizations. In the countries examined in his lecture, these reforms produced some positive changes but also several unsatisfactory outcomes that prompted Argentina, Bolivia, and Chile to implement substantial "re-reforms" in 2008 (Chile and Argentina) and in 2010 (Bolivia). Some of the negative outcomes of the initial reforms included the failure to successfully extend coverage for workers: coverage remained stagnant in Chile and Bolivia, while in Argentina it actually decreased by 45 percent. Other problems were the lack of gender equity and the failure of competition between private firms to effectively reduce administrative costs. The financial sustainability of the overall shift to privatized systems proved to be precarious. Transition periods were lengthy and costly, inducing large government debts. Capital returns in all three countries fell, the most drastic drop occurring in Chile, from 21 to 10 percent.

To remedy some of these negative outcomes Argentina, Bolivia, and Chile conducted "re-reforms", strengthening the role of the state in the pension system through diverse approaches. Chile maintained the privatized system but improved it; Argentina integrated the private system into the public system; and Bolivia nationalized its system. In terms of coverage, all three countries improved upon the previous system by extending coverage for the labor force and expanding coverage of non-contributory pensions. All three countries improved gender equity by compensating mothers for time spent raising children. In terms of financial sustainability, Mesa-Lago stressed that Chile had the greatest success in ensuring the long-term viability of its re-reforms, while the sustainability of the Argentine and Bolivian systems remain questionable. Capital returns have been increasing in Chile, while in Bolivia they have been falling, and in Argentina, they are negative. The deficit of Argentina's public fund is expected to increase five-fold over the next forty years, while in Bolivia, no long-term financial projections for the future of the state pensions fund have been established.

Mesa-Lago concluded by underscoring that the re-reforms have remedied many of the flaws of the initial privatization of pensions. He further emphasized that a one-size-fits-all approach with respect to pension reform is untenable because it fails to account for local specificities and internal dynamics of a given country. For example, while all three countries have expanded the role of the state in pensions, not all have pursued the outright closing of the private system. The Chilean case demonstrates how a privatized system can be maintained and substantially improved with state involvement. The case of Argentina demonstrates a successful example of integration of the private system into the public system, with the important caveat that other measures might have to be taken to ensure its long-term financial viability. Mesa-Lago added, as a final note, that it remains to be seen how these re-reforms will influence the complete or partially privatized pensions systems still in place in other Latin America countries.

-Hannagan Johnson

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Noon-Time Talk on Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898 with Lucia Abramovic

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Join Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's curatorial fellow for Spanish colonial art for a Noontime Talk on the exhibition Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Noontime Talks are brief, informative discussions on exhibitions and installations in NOMA's galleries. Wednesdays are free admission days for Louisiana residents. Please visit the NOMA website for more information.

Mining, Privilege, and Artistic Production in the Colonial Andes: Short Film and Roundtable Discussion

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This program includes a screening of Harun Farocki's film The Silver and the Cross (20 min), which examines a 1758 painting by Gaspar Miguel de Berrío that depicts the city and the surrounding silver mines of Potosí, Bolivia. A roundtable discussion featuring three local scholars of Colonial Latin America will follow the film. The discussion will employ the film's description of colonial Potosí as an anchor for a broader discussion about colonial Andean economics, history, and art, particularly as it relates to Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

The goal of this event is to better understand the mechanisms that created the level of wealth exhibited in Behind Closed Doors, and to shed light on an often overlooked city that was essential to the economic success of Spanish America for hundreds of years.

The roundtable discussants are Dr. Kris Lane, the France V. Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History, Department of History, Tulane University; Dr. John Charles, Associate Professor of Colonial Spanish American Literature and Director of Graduate Studies, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University; and Dr. Ari Zighelboim, Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University. Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's Curatorial Fellow for Spanish Colonial Art, will moderate the discussion.

About Dr. Kris Lane
Kris Lane holds the France V. Scholes Chair in Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University. His books include Quito 1599: City & Colony in Transition, Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires, and Pillaging the Empire: Piracy in the Americas, 1500-1750. He is currently writing a history of the great Potosí mint scandal of 1649, along with an annotated translation of early writings on Potosí.

About Dr. John Charles
John Charles is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University. He is the author of numerous articles on colonial Andean literature and history, and the book Allies at Odds: The Andean Church and Its Indigenous Agents, 1583-1671 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010).

About Dr. Ari Zighelboim
Ari Zighelboim (Lima, 1960) studied in Peru, Israel and the United States, graduating with a Bachelor's degree in history and East Asian studies, an MA in cultural anthropology and a PhD in Spanish and Latin American literature. His masters paper dealt with scenes of human sacrifice on mountains in Moche iconography, and his PhD thesis with the surviving Inca nobility during the colonial period in Peru and its cultural and social strategies. He has written about Ruben Dario, Juan de Espinosa Medrano, the drama in Quechua Ollantay, Potosí and other topics. He has also published a volume of poetry. He is now senior lecturer in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane university.

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Assistant Professor Mia Bagneris will lecture on "Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World," on Friday, September 12 at 6pm at the New Orleans Museum of Art. The lecture will be held in conjunction with the exhibit, Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Professor Bagneris teaches African American/Diaspora art history and studies of race in Western Art. Her own work concentrates on the construction of race in British and American art and visual culture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to invite you to the Art Exhibition of Mexican Masters entitled “Footprints in Time. 5 Generations of Mexican Artists at the Parota.” The exhibit will feature works by Mexican artists Jose Luis Cuevas, Leonora Carrington, Alberto Castro Leñero, Manuel Felguerez, Gilberto Aceves Navarro, Francisco Toledo, and Roger Von Gunten among other.

The exhibit will run from August 29th to September 26th at the Art Gallery of the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans. An opening reception will be held on August 29th at 6 pm.

Information on La Parota:

The Fine Art Center “La Parota” was created in 1996, by the combined efforts of the Government of the State of Colima's Ministry of Culture and the National Council for Culture and the Arts. “The Parota” celebrates a long continuing artistic history, full of achievements and great national and international recognition. The participation of the most important Mexican Masters teaching production of printmaking workshops and Fine Arts have been carried out at this Centre with great success since its beginning.

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Congreso internacional de literatura y cultura centroamericanas (CILCA XXIII)

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Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, y Purdue University Calumet tienen el gusto de invitar al CONGRESO DE LITERATURA y CULTURA CENTROAMERICANAS (CILCA XXIII) que se llevará a cabo en la ciudad de New Orleans, Louisiana, del 11 al 13 de marzo del 2015 en el campus de Tulane University y Loyola University New Orleans.

Desde el primer congreso realizado en Nicaragua 1993, CILCA se ha caracterizado por ser un espacio de intercambio intelectual y de amistad para académicas/os, escritoras/es y lectoras/es. El congreso se ha efectuado en todos los países centroamericanos y por primera vez en su historia, CILCA se realizará en los Estados Unidos. La ciudad escogida es Nueva Orleáns, puerta de entrada hacia el Caribe y los países de América Central. El intercambio cultural entre Nueva Orleáns y América Central ha sido intenso por muchísimos años, y la ciudad alberga una de las comunidades de origen hondureño más grandes de los Estados Unidos. Tulane University tiene estrechos lazos con la región a través del Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, y the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola University New Orleans se ha distinguido por el trabajo con las comunidades hispanas que realizan varias de sus unidades académicas, incluyendo the Law School y el Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

La organización de CILCA XXIII la realizan la Dra. Maureen Shea y el Dr. Uriel Quesada, expertos en literatura y cultura centroamericanas, con el apoyo del Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creador y promotor de CILCA.

La convocatoria será publicada en agosto 2014.

Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, and Purdue University Calumet invite you to the Congress on Literature and Culture of Central America (CILCA XXIII) which will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana March 11-13 2015 on the campuses of Tulane and Loyola New Orleans.

From the first conference, held in Nicaragua in 1993, CILCA has been a space for intellectual exchange and friendship for academics and writers. The conference has been held in all of the Central American countries and for the first time in its history will be held in the United States. New Orleans, the gateway to the Caribbean and Central America, has been chosen as the location. New Orleans and Central America have a longstanding cultural exchange and New Orleans has one of the largest Honduran communities in the United States. Tulane has long connections with the region through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, and the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola New Orleans works closely with hispanic communities particularly through the Law school and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

CILCA XXIII is organized by Drs. Maureen Shea and Uriel Quesada, experts on the literature and culture of Central America, with the support of Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creator of CILCA.

Call for papers coming in August 2014.