Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions

Working Document: Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions
by Lustig, Nora and Carola Pessino
November 2012

Abstract
Between 2003 and 2009, Argentina’s social spending as a share of GDP increased by 7.6 percentage points. Marginal benefit incidence analysis for 2003, 2006, and 2009 suggests that the contribution of cash transfers to the reduction of disposable income inequality and poverty rose markedly between 2006 and 2009 primarily due to the launching of a noncontributory pension program- the pension moratorium- in 2004. Noncontributory pensions as a share of GDP rose by 2.2 percentage points between 2003 and 2009 and entailed a redistribution of income to the poor, and from the formal sector pensioners with above minimum pensions to the beneficiaries of the pension moratorium. The redistributive impact of the expansion of public spending on education and health was also sizeable and equalizing, but to a lesser degree. An assessment of fiscal funding sources puts the sustainability of the redistributive policies into question, unless nonsocial spending is significantly cut.

Working Document: Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions, Updated November 2012

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Global Café: A Gathering of Internationally- Minded Tulanians

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Hosted by the Office of Study Abroad, the Office of International Students and Scholars, and the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life

Come hang out with international students, returned study abroad students, perspective study abroad students, and internationally minded Tulane faculty and staff members. Every Monday from 3:00-5:00 PM. Coffee and cookies provided!

La Hora del Cuento: Bilingual Story Time at the Pebbles Center Uptown

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Join the Pebbles Center at the Children’s Resource Center branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

Held the second Tuesday of every month at 4:30 PM, we will read a book and have a craft based on the book. Past books include Counting Ovejas, Drum Dream Girl, and Mango, Abuela, and Me.

Story Hour Themes

September 12
Familia Fun (Mixed Age/Family)

October 10
Dia de los Muertos/Day of the Dead (Mixed Age/Family)

November 14
Food/La Comida (Preschoolers/Family)

December 12
Animalitos/Little Critters (Mixed Age/Family)

La Hora del Cuento: Bilingual Story Time at the Pebbles Center Algiers

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Join the Pebbles Center at the Algiers Regional branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

Held the second Tuesday of every month at 10:30 AM, we will read a book and have a craft based on the book. Past books include Counting Ovejas, Drum Dream Girl, and Mango, Abuela, and Me.

Story Hour Themes

October 10
Dia de los Muertos/Day of the Dead (Mixed Age/Family)

November 14
Food/La Comida (Preschoolers/Family)

December 12
Animalitos/Little Critters (Mixed Age/Family)

Identity: Art Exhibition

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Identity: Art Exhibition by Gustavo Duque, Lisa Restrepo and Belinda Shinshillas. Showing from October 4th to December 30th.
Opening Reception: October 4th, 2016 from 7:00 to 9:00 PM

“Identity” is an exhibition thought to examine how three Hispanic-Latino visual artist can create bodies of work so different and diverse when they have the same heritage. How gender, age and personal experiences can shape the way they perceive and express their vision based on internal observation.

The works presented here represent two countries that share rich heritage. Colombia and Mexico have a long history of cultural exchange. Traditionally, artist have created master pieces back and forth in both countries however, in this occasion their encounter is not in Latin America, but in New Orleans.

Luisa Restrepo and Gustavo Duque were born in the city of Medellin in different decades. Restrepo is a graphic artist working with a contemporary visual vocabulary deconstructing and reconstructing symbols and icons, creating stories through cut silhouettes influenced by the deep history of her native Colombia. Duque depicts the richness and strength of the soul exploring the fear and freedom of the human condition. He captures with a sublime force the voice that in the silence of solitude nobody wants to scream. Belinda Shinshillas is a native of the Capital City of Mexico. She works with abstraction as a way to move through space where all elements become a metaphoric voice. Her paintings are an extension of her identity and culture, using color as an idea, an attitude and interpretation between intimacy and distance seeking spiritual transformation.

Ancient Maya Landscapes: K-16 Educator Workshop

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In conjunction with the Middle American Research Institute’s 14th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium “Monumental Landscapes: How the Maya Shaped Their World” and the New Orleans Museum of Art LARC is presenting a K-16 educator workshop on Ancient Maya Landscapes. The workshop will address how the Maya viewed the world around them as well as resources for teaching about the Maya and interactive activities for the classroom.

Participants will receive lunch, teaching materials and CEUs.

An updated schedule is coming soon.

Register through the TMS website.

14th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium Monumental Landscapes: How the Maya Shaped Their World

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The Middle American Research Institute, the Alphawood Foundation, and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are proud to present the Fourteenth Annual Tulane Maya Symposium and Workshop. This year’s symposium, titled “Monumental Landscapes: How the Maya Shaped Their World”, will examine how the ancient Maya built up and transformed their landscapes to create monumental cities and lasting communities. The invited scholars have explored this topic across the Maya area, from the lowlands of Belize and Guatemala to the Guatemalan highlands.

Visit the Tulane Maya Symposium homepage for more information and updated schedules. Registration is now open.