Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions

Working Document: Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions
by Lustig, Nora and Carola Pessino
November 2012

Abstract
Between 2003 and 2009, Argentina’s social spending as a share of GDP increased by 7.6 percentage points. Marginal benefit incidence analysis for 2003, 2006, and 2009 suggests that the contribution of cash transfers to the reduction of disposable income inequality and poverty rose markedly between 2006 and 2009 primarily due to the launching of a noncontributory pension program- the pension moratorium- in 2004. Noncontributory pensions as a share of GDP rose by 2.2 percentage points between 2003 and 2009 and entailed a redistribution of income to the poor, and from the formal sector pensioners with above minimum pensions to the beneficiaries of the pension moratorium. The redistributive impact of the expansion of public spending on education and health was also sizeable and equalizing, but to a lesser degree. An assessment of fiscal funding sources puts the sustainability of the redistributive policies into question, unless nonsocial spending is significantly cut.

Working Document: Social Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina During the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions, Updated November 2012

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Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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Havana, Cuba | June 18 – July 2, 2016

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This two-week program provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and country that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don’t miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

Tulane’s summer program is locally sponsored and supported by the National Union of Writers and Artists. Participants will stay within walking distance of the Malecón, the university, and several cultural venues. In addition to field trips in Havana, there will also be group excursions to the historic cities of Trinidad and Cienfuegos, the Che Guevara monument in Santa Clara, Playa Girón, and Viñales.

For more information and for the institute application, please visit the Institute webpage.