Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

"Developing Understanding Through Studying Abroad" by Porter Reim

By Annie Gibson

I am handing over my blog on the CIAPA Experience to the students participating in the program. This way you all can have a better idea of what life is like for a student at CIAPA. This blog entry is written by Porter Reim. He is a freshman student who has begun his first semester of Tulane at CIAPA in Costa Rica 2012. Pura Vida, Professor Gibson

By Porter Reim

One of the primary reasons students choose to study abroad is to experience and learn about a different culture. While this is of course a wonderful reason, something Iâ’‘¬’“¢ve learned that is equally important is studying abroad teaches you how to experience a different culture. Even though the other students and I have only been in Costa Rica for six weeks, we have learned a great deal about Costa Rica, but more importantly, have learned a great deal about how to learn. Since our arrival, we have been working in two local schools with Fundación Acción Joven, an organization that encourages performance in school and emphasizes the importance of education. We first approached the students with some apprehension and unfamiliarity, but have since connected and learned how similar our two groups are. As we teach them English, they teach us all you need to connect is a positive attitude and something to talk about. Little is off limits in the connected world we live in, and many of the students have the same interests as us. Although we may fall out of contact with some of these students, we will continue to use the skills we learned, just as they will use the English they learned.

Recently, we traveled to Rara Avis, a lodge and research center stationed deep in the jungle for a weekend of experiencing nature. A group of German biology students who were conducting research came the same weekend, and we shared all of our meals with them. Although we could have stayed within ourselves, we used our opportunities to become friends with the Germans and learn more about them. Because we kept open minds and developed relationships with them, they shared with us the interesting animals and insects they found. On two different nights, they allowed us to examine up close rare bats that had been caught. Because we were open-minded, we received an opportunity few people will have. However, those werenâ’‘¬’“¢t the only new opportunities that I had. While swimming in a pool at the base of a waterfall, I decided to leap off a very high rock. Initially I did not want to and was very scared, but finally jumped anyways. I knew it was safe and I knew that people had done it before me, and would do it after me. All it took was that willingness on my part. I enjoyed the experience immensely, and climbed back up and jumped off two more times. I will never forget how much I didnâ’‘¬’“¢t want to jump, but I will also never forget how glad I am I did. It is often making that first metaphorical, or literal, jump that is the hardest, and studying abroad takes students out of their comfort zones to find how enjoyable the unfamiliar can be. Finally, besides teaching how to act when experiencing a culture, studying abroad also teaches how to act when others are experiencing your culture. Being a minority in a foreign country, I became aware of how foreigners must feel in my country. My idea of what is a custom or tradition widen greatly, and it became clear how much of day to day life is affected by one custom or another. Although I have only been in Costa Rica for six out of fourteen weeks, I have already learned innumerable lessons for engaging other cultures, and helping others engage my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • Annie Gibson

    Administrative Assistant Professor - Department of Global Education

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Upcoming Events

Bate Papo! Primavera 2020--NOW ONLINE!

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Bate Papo will now be held virtually! Join the conversation!

A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome! Meetings take place on Fridays at different hours and locations. See the full schedule below:

January 17th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de maracuja

January 24th, 3 PM, Boot
Treat: Suco de caju

January 31st, 4PM, Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St.)
Treat: Suco de caja

February 7th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Agua de coco

February 14th, 11 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Guarana

February 21st, 12PM, PJs Willow
Treat: Cha de maracuja

February 28th, 2PM, Sharp Residence Hall
Treat: Cafe brasiliero

March 6th, 9:30 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Cha matte

March 13th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de goiaba

March 20th, 3 PM, Greenbaum House
Treat: Limonada a brasiliera

March 27th, 12 PM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Batido de abacate

April 3rd, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de acai

April 17th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Caldo de cana

April 24th, 2 PM, Boot
Treat: Groselha

Teaching Aztec History through Art: Online K-12 Webinar

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Join us for the final webinar in the series on Ancient Civilizations. This workshop has moved online and will consist of a 60 minute online webinar that includes an introduction to teaching Aztec history, a discussion of different art objects that the Aztecs created which reveal insights into their history, and a discussion of new online resources to incorporate into your teaching.

The webinar is free an open to educators of all grade levels. In order to access the session, please register here.

Please email dwolteri@tulane.edu for more information.

Co-sponsored by S.S.NOLA.

Pebbles Center Launches Virtual La hora del cuento/Story Time

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Join us every Thursday at 3 PM CST for a live reading of books in Spanish from the Pebbles collection. Books from this collection share stories of Latin America, the Caribbean and the Latinx community in the U.S. The Pebbles collection is a collaborative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library. Author and educator, Andrea Olatunji shares the latest top Spanish language picture books. Originally scheduled to share her work at the Tulane Book Festival (cancelled due to COVID-19), she is now jumping online to help young readers explore Latin America in Spanish from home. Check out her work www.cuentacuento.com to learn more.

Make sure to ‘like’ The Pebbles Center on Facebook to receive updates. This program takes place live on this Facebook page.

Ancient Civilizations K-16 Series for Social Studies Educators

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Ancient Civilizations
K-16 Educator Workshop Series
Spring 2020

For educators of grade levels: K-12

Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute (MARI), Stone Center for Latin American Studies (SCLAS), S.S. NOLA, and AfterCLASS will host a professional development workshop series open to all K-16 school professionals. These workshops will challenge educators to learn about the unexpected impact and connections of Ancient civilizations from Central America to the Gulf South. In particular, the workshops will foster a deeper comprehension of how to incorporate art, language and food across the disciplines. Participants will learn unique ways to incorporate the Tunica, Maya and Aztec cultures into the classroom in a variety of subjects. Registration for each workshop is $5 and includes light snacks, teaching resources, and a certificate of completion.

The workshop series will prepare teachers:

  • To utilize digital humanities resources in the classroom;
  • To design culturally appropriate primary and secondary research projects;
  • To teach about Pre-Columbian and ancient civilizations, language, geography and foods;
  • To encourage student self-determination through meaningful and relevant cultural projects.

Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Tunica of the Lower Mississippi River Valley
Middle American Research Institute – Seminar Room
6823 St. Charles Avenue
This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Participants will explore the physical, cultural and linguistic characteristics of the region. Representatives of the Tunica community will introduce their language and culture and the work they do to preserve their language.

Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Understanding Maya Fare: Beyond Tamales and Cacao
AfterCLASS – Taylor Education Center
612 Andrew Higgins Blvd. #4003
In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from chocolate specialists and our Kaqchikel language scholar will discuss the importance of corn. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, APRIL 29, 2020
Aztec Mexican Art and Culture
Participants in this workshop will explore the art and culture of the Aztec community.