Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

All Regions

Committed to the importance of international experience and reinforcing Tulane University’s mission to provide opportunities which help students gain understanding, acquire knowledge and develop skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies strongly encourages students to avail themselves of a variety of overseas programs, including several which are directly operated by Tulane. These include summer, semester and year-long programs in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America.

Amazon

The Amazon is a region of superlatives. It spans the borders of eight countries and one overseas territory, is the world’s largest river basin and…

Andes

The Andes are the principal mountains of South America and one of the greatest mountain systems of the world. The Andes include some of the…

Argentina

In 1816, the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata declared their independence from Spain. After Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay went their separate ways,…

Bahamas

An archipelago of 700 islands and islets, the Bahamas attracts millions of tourists each year. The visitors come to enjoy its mild climate, fine beaches…

Belize

Belize was the site of several Mayan city states until their decline at the end of the first millennium A.D. The British and Spanish disputed…

Bolivia

Bolivia, named after independence fighter Simón Bolívar, broke away from Spanish rule in 1825; much of its subsequent history has consisted of a series of…

Brazil

Following more than three centuries under Portuguese rule, Brazil peacefully gained its independence in 1822, maintaining a monarchical system of government until the abolition of…

Caribbean

The Caribbean region comprises three main island chains that extend in a roughly crescent shape from the eastern tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico…

Central America

In political terms, Central America consists of seven independent nations: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. With the exception of Costa…

Chile

Prior to the coming of the Spanish in the 16th century, northern Chile was under Inca rule while the indigenous Mapuche inhabited central and southern…

Colombia

Colombia was one of the three countries that emerged from the collapse of Gran Colombia in 1830 (the others are Ecuador and Venezuela). A four-decade…

Costa Rica

Although explored by the Spanish early in the 16th century, initial attempts at colonizing Costa Rica proved unsuccessful due to a combination of factors, including:…

Cuba

The native Amerindian population of Cuba began to decline after European arrival on the island in 1492 and following its development as a Spanish colony…

Dominican Republic

Explored and claimed by Christopher Columbus on his first voyage in 1492, the island of Hispaniola became a springboard for Spanish conquest of the Caribbean…

Ecuador

What is now Ecuador formed part of the northern Inca Empire until the Spanish conquest in 1533. Quito became a seat of Spanish colonial government…

El Salvador

El Salvador has been wracked by civil war and a succession of natural disasters. The tiny country is the most densely-populated state on the mainland…

General Latin America

Latin America, in the broadest sense, the entire American land mass south of the United States. In a more restricted sense Latin America comprises those…

Guatemala

The Mayan civilization flourished in Guatemala and surrounding regions during the first millennium A.D. After almost three centuries as a Spanish colony, Guatemala won its…

Guyana, French Guiana & Suriname

Originally a Dutch colony in the 17th century, by 1815 Guyana had become a British possession. The abolition of slavery led to black settlement of…

Haiti

The native Taino Amerindians – who inhabited the island of Hispaniola when it was discovered by Columbus in 1492 – were virtually annihilated by Spanish…

Honduras

Once part of Spain’s vast empire in the New World, Honduras became an independent nation in 1821. After two and a half decades of mostly…

Iberian Peninsula

Iberian Peninsula, peninsula, southwestern Europe, separated from the rest of the continent by the Pyrenees. It is divided politically into Spain, Portugal, and the British…

Jamaica

The island – discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1494 – was settled by the Spanish early in the 16th century. The native Taino Indians, who…

Mesoamerica

Mesoamerica is the cultural area encompassing present-day Mexico and most of Central America, where a number of civilizations with shared traits and cultural traditions developed…

Mexico

The site of advanced Amerindian civilizations, Mexico came under Spanish rule for three centuries before achieving independence early in the 19th century. A devaluation of…

Nicaragua

The Pacific coast of Nicaragua was settled as a Spanish colony from Panama in the early 16th century. Independence from Spain was declared in 1821…

North America

North America, third largest of the seven continents, including Canada (the 2nd largest country in area in the world), the United States (3rd largest), and…

Panama

Explored and settled by the Spanish in the 16th century, Panama broke with Spain in 1821 and joined a union of Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela…

Paraguay

Paraguay achieved its independence from Spain in 1811. In the disastrous War of the Triple Alliance (1865-70) – between Paraguay and Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay…

Peru

Ancient Peru was the seat of several prominent Andean civilizations, most notably that of the Incas whose empire was captured by the Spanish conquistadors in…

Portugal

Following its heyday as a global maritime power during the 15th and 16th centuries, Portugal lost much of its wealth and status with the destruction…

Puerto Rico

Populated for centuries by aboriginal peoples, the island was claimed by the Spanish Crown in 1493 following Columbus’ second voyage to the Americas. In 1898,…

South America

South America is the fourth largest of Earth’s seven continents (after Asia, Africa, and North America), occupying 17,820,900 sq km (6,880,700 sq mi), or 12…

Southern Cone

The Southern Cone is a geographic region composed of the southernmost areas of South America, south of the Tropic of Capricorn. Although geographically this includes…

Spain

Spain’s powerful world empire of the 16th and 17th centuries ultimately yielded command of the seas to England. Subsequent failure to embrace the mercantile and…

Trinidad & Tobago

First colonized by the Spanish, the islands came under British control in the early 19th century. The islands’ sugar industry was hurt by the emancipation…

United States

Residents of the United States who trace their ancestry to countries in the western hemisphere where the Spanish language is spoken have lived in what…

Uruguay

Montevideo, founded by the Spanish in 1726 as a military stronghold, soon took advantage of its natural harbor to become an important commercial center. Claimed…

Venezuela

Venezuela was one of three countries that emerged from the collapse of Gran Colombia in 1830 (the others being Ecuador and New Granada, which became…

West Indies

The West Indies is an archipelago that extends in an arc from near southern Florida to the coast of Venezuela. The West Indies archipelago, which…

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Upcoming Events

Carnaval Latino and Parade of the Americas

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Join us for the 19th annual Carnaval Latino festival in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month on October 13 through October 15, 2018.

The Hispanic culture has thrived in New Orleans for almost 300 years, and Spanish influence can be seen all over the city. To celebrate the best of Latin culture, Carnaval Latino returns to the downtown area.

The Hispanic American Musicians and Artists Cultural Association hosts the festival to celebrate the music, food, art and culture of Latin America. Numerous musicians, both locally and from overseas, perform to honor the rich Spanish heritage in New Orleans.

In addition to live music and fantastic food, the Krewe of Quetzal will kick off the celebration with a New Orleans style parade, Desfile de Las Americas, or Parade of the Americas, on Saturday, October 13. See the Hispanic community ride in elaborate costumes, throwing souvenirs to the crowds. After the parade, festival goers will then enjoy Latin music, art, food and drink, during Carnaval Latino’s festival at Generations Hall in the Warehouse District.

For more information on the festival and parade, visit Carnaval Latino’s official website.

Equity Thursdays Series to host talk on racism and immigration in the U.S.

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On Thursday, October 18, join the Community Engagement Advocates, the Tulane University Center for Public Service and the Office of Multicultural Affairs for a talk titled Racism & Immigration in The US as part of the Equity Thursday series.

The conversation around immigration in the United States is arguably as pertinent right now as any time in U.S. history. And yet, immigration has been a constant theme and thread throughout U.S. history, from colonization of indigenous lands, to Westward expansion and “Manifest Destiny”, to the notion of a “Melting Pot.” And while we may learn about certain events in school and popular culture, how much do we really know about the history of racism and immigration? How do these histories connect with and influence our experiences today? How did immigration policies shape how we got here?

We invite participants to join us as we walk together through an Incomplete Timeline of Racism and Immigration, followed by a dialogue.
Lunch will be provided!

For more information and to register, visit OrgSync.

Equity Thursdays offer weekly presentations by members of the Tulane University community and invited guests from Greater New Orleans. Faculty, Students, Staff, Alumni and Friends share information regarding topics of academic access. The sessions discuss cutting edge research, distinctive academic opportunities and offer a forum for reflection on the intersection of identity and the academic experience. Students, faculty, and staff are welcome to participate in Equity Thursdays and join the Center for Academic Equity community.

Medical anthropologist Dr. Torres-Velez to present research on responses to environmental and public health changes in Puerto Rico

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Join the Office of Research at Tulane University in welcoming Dr. Víctor M. Torres-Velez, who will be presenting in his research in a talk titled, Racializing Space: the Enviro-embodied Poetics of Bare Life in the Age of Neoliberalism on Thursday, October 18.

Dr. Torres-Velez received his bachelors from the University of Puerto Rico (1996) and his Masters (2003) and Ph.D. (2007) from Michigan State University. He is currently affiliated with the Department of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at City University of New York. He is a critical medical anthropologist by training, who specializes in gender, justice and environmental change. Dr. Torres-Vélez’ interdisciplinary theoretical expertise and interests are diverse. Some of these include: political ecology, development theories, theories of social change, transnationalism, science and technology studies, visual anthropology and contemporary and classical theory. Dr. Torres-Vélez’ regional focus is Latin America and the Caribbean, with an emphasis in Puerto Rico. Dr. Torres-Vélez’ research explores people’s responses to drastic environmental and public health changes. Particularly, how people make sense of health problems in contexts environmental pollution and widespread chronic diseases. His emphasis on embodied meaning-making practices is used to decipher the triggers behind the emergence of environmental social movements. His more recent work focuses on the racialized spaces of capital as related to some of the cause(s) and consequential impacts of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico. While Dr. Torres-Vélez’ research in Vieques, Puerto Rico, contributes to Puerto Rican and Latin American studies in particular, his research insights provider a broader illustration of similar processes that affect people and places globally.

CIPR post-doctoral fellow Christopher Chambers-Ju to present on labor politics and teacher mobilization in Latin America

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Tulane University’s department of Political Science in association with the Murphy Institute and the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research is proud to begin the 2018-19 Political Science Seminar series with a presentation by Christopher Chambers-Ju titled, Varieties of Labor Politics: Teacher Mobilization in Latin America on Friday, October 19.

Dr. Christopher Chambers-Ju received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2017. His research examines the politics of education through a focus on teachers’ unions. Studying the cases of Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico, he examines why some teachers take to the streets while others form an organized voting bloc, with distinct relationships to political parties. By focusing on teachers, Christopher seeks to shed light on broader dynamics of education policy-making and political change in contemporary Latin America. Dr. Chambers-Ju is currently a post-doctoral fellow with the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research.

9th Annual South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica

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The 9th annual South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica will be hosted by the University of Texas San Antonio and the San Antonio Museum of Art on October 19 through October 21, 2018. The South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica is a regional conference that provides a venue to bring together scholars in the fields of archaeology, ethnography, art history, and others, as well as the general public, to share information and interpretations on current research focused on the cultures of the Mesoamerican region.

The keynote address will be given by Dr. Vera Tiesler, who has been a research professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico for nearly 20 years. Her academic interest lies in illuminating the human conditions of the Maya and of past society, by correlating data gleaned from human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts with information from other material and documentation. In her keynote address Ancient Maya Life, Death, and Identities: A View from Yaxuná, Yucatan, Mexico, Dr. Tiesler will discuss perceptions of life and death of the Yucatecan Maya prior to and during the rise of the ancient city of Chichén Itzá. This northern cultural arena is poorly understood compared to other regions of the Maya kingdoms. Tiesler anchors her explorations of ancient Northern Maya Lowlanders through examinations of the burial population at Yaxuná, another ancient urban center located in the heart of the Yucatan Peninsula and connected to Chichén Itzá by a causeway. The human remains unearthed during excavations provide valuable insight into everyday life, evolving social roles, collective identities, and manners of death experienced by Yucatec Maya. To reveal these mysteries, Tiesler combines several approaches, including bioarchaeology, mortuary archaeology, and artifact-based iconography. Her discussion will address the fate of individuals and neighborhoods, the regional trajectory that resulted in Yaxuná‘s rise, and then, ultimately, the city’s abandonment. She will conclude with thoughts on the advent of Chichén Itzá‘s political networks and what was perceived as a new cosmic era for the Maya.

During her career, Dr. Tiesler has conducted work on some 250 Maya burials. Her publications discuss living conditions and lifestyle among Maya social classes, social aspects of age and gender, physical appearance and body enhancement, violence, sacrifice, and ancestor veneration. Dr. Tiesler recently published her findings from Yaxuná in the book Before Kukulkán: Bioarchaeology of Maya Life, Death, and Identity at Classic Period Yaxuná (University of Arizona Press).

All conference events will be held at the San Antonio Museum of Art. The conference is free and open to the public.

To receive updates about the conference meeting, please sign up for the mailing list.

Registration for the 9th Annual South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica is now open. To register please fill out the registration form.

Schedule of Events

Friday, October 19
Keynote Address
Ancient Maya Life, Death, and Identities: A View from Yaxuná, Yucatan, Mexico
Dr. Vera Tiesler

Saturday, October 21
Screening of Out of the Maya Tombs
Panel Discussion lead by David Lebrun, Michelle Rich, and Jason Yaeger

Saturday October 20 – Sunday, October 21
Paper Presentations

Forging a New World: Books & Writing in Early Spanish America, 1492-1821

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On Wednesday, November 14, the Latin American Library at Tulane University will host Dr. Hortensia Calvo, Doris Stone Director of the Latin American Library, for a talk titled, Forging a New World: Books & Writing in Early Spanish America, 1492-1821.

This presentation is part of the Tulane University Women’s Association’s Jane and Herbert Longenecker Lecture Series. The event is dedicated to María García Daly.